Digital literacies

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ASLA XXIII Biennial Conference - Judith Way - To be effective participants in today's global society, we need a positive digital presence and to be digitally literate. Tips on how you can lead members of your school community to become effective and discerning global citizens, including having positive digital footprints and the benefits of working collaboratively online.

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Digital literacies

  1. 1. Digital literacies: why they are vital for everyone and how teacher librarians can lead schools in developing digital literacies for the entire school community. Digital literacies: why they are vital for everyone and how teacher librarians can lead schools in developing digital literacies for the entire school community. Judith Way Kew High School - @judithway cc licenced Flickr photo shared by Jenn Vargus
  2. 2. What is digital literacy? List your ideas: padlet.com/wall/asla13 cc licenced Flickr photo shared by Tim O’Brien
  3. 3. What is digital literacy?What is digital literacy? • “Digital literacy is the ability to use information and communication technologies to find, understand, evaluate, create, and communicate digital information, an ability that requires both cognitive and technical skills.” American Library Association Office for Information Technology Policy January 2013 cc licenced Flickr photo shared by Kenneth
  4. 4. What is digital literacy?What is digital literacy? “A digitally literate person: • possesses the variety of skills—cognitive and technical—required to find, understand, evaluate, create, and communicate digital information in a wide variety of formats;” American Library Association Office for Information Technology Policy January 2013 cc licenced Flickr photo shared by Hisako TANAKA
  5. 5. What is digital literacy?What is digital literacy? “A digitally literate person: • is able to use diverse technologies appropriately and effectively to search for and retrieve information, interpret search results, and judge the quality of the information retrieved;” American Library Association Office for Information Technology Policy January 2013 cc licenced Flickr photo shared by Rodrigo Vera
  6. 6. What is digital literacy?What is digital literacy? “A digitally literate person: • understands the relationships among technology, lifelong learning, personal privacy, and appropriate stewardship of information;” American Library Association Office for Information Technology Policy January 2013 cc licenced Flickr photo shared by JayJay P
  7. 7. What is digital literacy? What is digital literacy? “A digitally literate person: • uses these skills and the appropriate technologies to communicate and collaborate with peers, colleagues, family, and on occasion the general public;” American Library Association Office for Information Technology Policy January 2013 cc licenced Flickr photo shared by C.K. Koay
  8. 8. What is digital literacy?What is digital literacy? “A digitally literate person: • uses these skills to participate actively in civic society and contribute to a vibrant, informed, and engaged community.” American Library Association Office for Information Technology Policy January 2013 cc licenced Flickr photo shared by Chris Jagers
  9. 9. Australian curriculum
  10. 10. Australian curriculum http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/GeneralCapabilities/Information-and- Communication-Technology-capability/Continuum#page=2
  11. 11. What is digital literacy?
  12. 12. Why is digital literacy vital? cc licenced Flickr photo shared by Will Lion
  13. 13. Why is digital literacy vital?
  14. 14. Why is digital literacy vital?
  15. 15. Why is digital literacy vital?
  16. 16. Find
  17. 17. Find
  18. 18. Find
  19. 19. Find
  20. 20. Find
  21. 21. Find
  22. 22. Understand
  23. 23. Evaluate
  24. 24. Evaluate
  25. 25. Evaluate
  26. 26. How can we lead? Learn Reproduced by permission of the publisher, © 2012 by tpack.org
  27. 27. How can we lead? Learn
  28. 28. How can we lead? Learn
  29. 29. How can we lead? Learn
  30. 30. How can we lead? Learn
  31. 31. How can we lead? Learn
  32. 32. How can we lead? Connect
  33. 33. How can we lead? Learn, create and communicate
  34. 34. How can we lead? Learn, create and communicate
  35. 35. How can we lead? Learn, create and communicate
  36. 36. How can we lead? Create and communicate
  37. 37. How can we lead? Create and communicate
  38. 38. How can we lead? Learn, create and communicate
  39. 39. How can we lead? Learn, collaborate and share
  40. 40. How can we lead? Create and communicate
  41. 41. How can we lead? Search, understand, evaluate, create and communicate
  42. 42. How can we lead? Search, understand, evaluate, create and communicate
  43. 43. How can we lead? Collaborate
  44. 44. How can we lead? Learn, share and collaborate
  45. 45. How can we lead? Collaborate
  46. 46. How can we lead? Collaborate
  47. 47. How can we lead? Collaborate
  48. 48. How can we lead? Collaborate
  49. 49. How can we lead? Learn, collaborate and share
  50. 50. How can we lead? Learn, collaborate and share
  51. 51. Traps
  52. 52. Traps
  53. 53. Traps
  54. 54. Traps
  55. 55. Digital citizenship Respect others. Someone might annoy you, but that's no reason to publicly criticise them. cc licenced Flickr photo shared by Alexandre Dulaunoy
  56. 56. Digital citizenshipDigital citizenship Treat others as you'd like to be treated. How would you feel if someone called you an offensive name, or spread exaggerations or lies about you? cc licenced Flickr photo shared by tq2cute
  57. 57. Digital citizenshipDigital citizenship If your grandmother would find it offensive or inappropriate, then don't publish it. This is a great general guide to life as well. If Grandma would be disappointed in what you publish, then the odds are that other people will be too. cc licenced Flickr photo shared by Jhawk
  58. 58. Digital citizenship Ask permission before publishing photos of friends. They might not want to be plastered all over your Facebook page or Instagram account. Respect their views. cc licenced Flickr photo shared by Special Collections at Wofford College
  59. 59. Digital citizenship If you are unhappy posing for a photo, say so. You never know where it might end up. It's much easier to ask for your photo not to be taken than to have to try to have it deleted from cameras, phone and the internet. • cc licenced Flickr photo shared by Wishymom
  60. 60. Digital citizenship There are real-life consequences to what you do, say and share online. This includes reposting on tumblr and retweeting on Twitter. Friendships can break up; parents, schools and police can get involved. In the case of hate pages, there could be charges and/or court action. cc licenced Flickr photo shared by kxlly
  61. 61. Digital citizenship Digital citizenship Be aware of your own privacy and that of others. If a friend is going overseas, or going through a breakup, don't announce it to the world on your Facebook timeline. They may not want to share the details with anyone apart from you. This also goes for you – are you sure you really want to share the intimate details of your latest disease with the world? cc licenced Flickr photo shared by Antonio Martinez
  62. 62. The end…

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