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Developing digital literacy in your school

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A presentation at the ASLA conference in 2011 by Nadia Merchant, Jessica Jorna and Trent McAllan

A presentation at the ASLA conference in 2011 by Nadia Merchant, Jessica Jorna and Trent McAllan

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  • Introduction from ASLA person/grab video?\n\n0-5 minutes\n\nRationale/Introduction - Why we’ve created a Digital Literacy Framework, what our roles at the school are, why it is important to do this. \n\n5-10 minutes\n
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  • Found Lamb's comparison very helpful when considering the range of frameworks out there. \n
  • What does the framework look like?\n- Broken down into six stages using NSW DET ISP plus other frameworks that I looked at while developing my section\n- Questions for students to consider\n- Integrated with the other two strands \n
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  • Nadia Critical literacy skills were broken down via Blooms taxonomy.\n\n10 - 15 minutes\n\nThere were many different theorist and ideas to consider when deciding which direction we were going to take in regards to critical thinking skills to be included in this matrix. First I had to consider what I thought critical thinking was and where our modern perspectives have grown from.\n\nThe beginnings of critical thought can be traced back to Greek Socratic tradition that dates back over 2,500 years in which probing questions were used to determine whether claims to knowledge based on authority could be rationally justified with clarity and logical consistency.\n
  • I had to consider, what is critical thinking and how does this work within the values inherent in within Ignatian Pedagogy?* a willingness to imagine or remain open to considering alternative perspectives.* willingness to integrate new or revised perspectives into our ways of thinking and acting.* Taking any new information or perspectives that may have become apparent and seeking change or further information.\n
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  • Today, mainstream education has been influenced significantly by the research and writings of such notable constructivists as Ausubel (1968), Brookfield (1987), Bruner (1966), Dewey (1933), Knowles (1980), Mezirow(1981), Piaget (1969), and Vygotsky (1978), as well as classic educators like Bloom (1956) and Chickering (1981). Their work in the areas of self-directed learning, transformational learning, experiential learning, and reflective thought are central to today’s educational practice.An important element commonly associated with all of these areas is critical thinking. The concept of critical thinking can be traced back to Dewey’s (1933) reflective thinking model. In reviewing the literature, one can find as many definitions of critical thinking as authors writing on the subject. \n
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  • TrentICT Literacy-Hard Skills, apps - how this will be an ongoing area of development-Soft Skills, ACARA, BOS - these will change over time as students come to us with different skill sets already and we introduce these skills at earlier levels and mastery occurs earlier.\n\n20 - 25 minutes\n
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  • Trent to Introduce:Play time in groups of 2-3 to work on a matrix for their context, each participant has a blank DLF proforma. The three of us will walk around and give assistance and guidance.\n\n25 - 40 minutes\n
  • Trent to Introduce:Play time in groups of 2-3 to work on a matrix for their context, each participant has a blank DLF proforma. The three of us will walk around and give assistance and guidance.\n\n25 - 40 minutes\n
  • Trent to Introduce:Play time in groups of 2-3 to work on a DLF for their context, each participant has a blank DLF proforma. The three of us will walk around and give assistance and guidance.\n\n25 - 40 minutes\n

Developing digital literacy in your school Developing digital literacy in your school Presentation Transcript

  • Developing digital literacy in yourschool Jessica Jorna, Trent McAllan & Nadia Merchant Digital Learning Facilitators - Saint Ignatius’ College, Riverview
  • Our SessionOverview of our digital literacy matrixInformation Literacy - Jessica @craftylibrarianCritical Literacy - Nadia @nadiavoodooICT Literacy - Trent @trentmcPlay time - a digital literacy matrix for your contextQuestions
  • Information LiteracyWhat is information literacy?"To be information literate, a person must be able to recognizewhen information is needed and [have] the ability to locate,evaluate, and use effectively the needed information".- American Library Association
  • Information Literacy
  • Annette Lambs comparison
  • Information LiteracyWhat does the framework look like?- It’s broken into six stages using NSW DET Information Search Process stages.- There are questions to consider for students across all year levels across the six stages.- Integrated into the Digital Literacy Matrix.
  • Information LiteracyOverreaching questions- What is my purpose?- Why do I need to find this out?- What are the key words and ideas of the task?- What do I need to do?
  • Critical Literacy What is critical thinking? Where have our modern perspectives grown from? The Greek Socratic tradition dates back over 2,500 years. The term critical means crucial or related to core criteria and derives from the ancient Greek kriterion, which means standards; it also derives from kriticos, which means discerning judgment.
  • Critical thinking and your school context I had to consider, what is critical thinking and how does this work within the values inherent within Ignatian Pedagogy? * a willingness to imagine or remain open to considering alternative perspectives. * willingness to integrate new or revised perspectives into our ways of thinking and acting. * Taking any new information or perspectives that may have become apparent and seeking change either internally or externally.
  • John DeweyOctober 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952Dewey’s work led him to define reflective thought as:“active, persistent, and careful consideration ofany belief or supposed form of knowledge in the light of the grounds that support it,and the further conditions to which it tends” (p. 6).In this sense, knowledge gained throughreflective thought is individually constructedand revolves around ones personal beliefs.Beliefs that may or may not be substantiatedfrom a scientific perspective,but none the less are derivedfrom some personal experience (Dewey, 1910).
  • Constructivist educational theoristsToday, mainstream education has been influenced significantly by the research and writings of such notableconstructivists as:Ausubel MezirowBrookfield PiagetBruner VygotskyDewey as well as:Knowles Bloom and Chickering
  • ACARAIn the Australian Curriculum students develop critical andcreative thinking as they learn to generate and evaluateknowledge, ideas and possibilities, and use them whenseeking new pathways or solutions.In learning to think broadly and deeply students learn to usereason and imagination to direct their thinking for differentpurposes. In the context of schooling, critical and creativethinking are integral to activities that require reason, logic,imagination and innovation.
  • Creative thinking? ACARA discusses the use of creative thinking as well as critical thinking. De Bono’s 6 hats. Why not?
  • Blooms Taxonomy
  • Blooms
  • ICT Literacy What is it? “...ICT Literacy is the ability to appropriately access, manage, integrate and evaluate information, develop new understandings and communicate with others in order to participate effectively in society.” - ACARA
  • ICT Literacy- Soft Skills - ACARA General Capabilities - ICT Competency - Personal and Social Competency - BOS
  • Questions?
  • Play timeThis time can be used to work on a matrix for your context.
  • References1. American Library Association (1989). Presidential Committee on Information Literacy: Final Report2. Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2011). Information and Communication Technology (ICT) competence. Available: http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/GeneralCapabilities/ ICT/ConceptualStatement3. Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2011). Personal and Social Competence. Available: http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/GeneralCapabilities/Personal-and-social- competence/ConceptualStatement4. Department of Education and Training New South Wales. (2007). Information skills in the school. Available: http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/teachingideas/isp/index.htm5. Lamb, A. (2007). Approaches to Information and Communication Literacy. Available: http://eduscapes.com/tap/ topic72.htm. Last accessed 2nd Oct 2011.6. Lankshear, C. (1987). Literacy, Schooling and Revolution. London: Falmer Press.7. Wood Team (2008). Information Literacy and Essential Skills At-A-Glance. Available: http://www.escuela.ca/8. Zurkowski, P. (1974). The Information Service Environment: Relationships and Priorities. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, Nov 1974.