"Open Access at the Coal Face: attitudes and practical responses" Yvonne Budden, DARTS4
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

"Open Access at the Coal Face: attitudes and practical responses" Yvonne Budden, DARTS4

on

  • 526 views

Open Access is, arguably, one of the most disruptive changes to the scholarly communications environment since the invention of the internet. Staff in academic and research libraries have been ...

Open Access is, arguably, one of the most disruptive changes to the scholarly communications environment since the invention of the internet. Staff in academic and research libraries have been facilitating this change and educating researchers about it since the first institutional repository was launched in 2000. But the pace of change has accelerated exponentially with the strengthening of the RCUK and Wellcome Trust mandates and the introduction of the HEFCE mandate among other funder moves in this area.

This talk will focus on the practical responses taken by the University of Warwick to cope with this change in all areas across the institution and the demands that this has placed on Library staff. It will focus on the Library perspective but also cover work done by the Research Office as well as the Graduate School and Student, Careers and Skills as part of a cross-institutional response. It will examine the practical challenges that we have faced in dealing with the new policies and some of the developments we have made to our institutional repository, WRAP (http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk) to support researchers wanting the advantages of open access. Additionally it will cover new areas of activity that have been undertaken by Library staff and offer a few of our ‘lessons learnt’ as well as a few future plans.

Finally the talk will discuss some of the early results from an institution wide survey of our researchers on their understanding of open access and attitudes to the process. This survey is an expansion of a survey that we ran in 2011 and the results will show whether or not the rapid changes and stronger funder mandates are really helping to win the hearts and minds of our researchers.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
526
Views on SlideShare
501
Embed Views
25

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0

1 Embed 25

https://twitter.com 25

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Clear that we haven’t got it completely right yet! But information like this from academics and in the follow up focus group discussions will allow us to continue to improve. <br /> Issues seems to be in the main that the processes aren’t easy for researchers – despite the Library assistance (mentioned later) – some of the financial procedures for both institutions and publishers continues to be difficult. If we could ensure that something like the Jisc APC pilot is continued to be worked on.
  • CDT/DTC – 6 EPSRC, 1 ESRC,
  • Formed a Scholarly Comms and Open Access working group – gives a high level steer on priorities for the spending of the <br /> Training with all bodies – departments, general sessions, research groups, interested individuals <br /> Accept as many offers as possible! <br /> Rule of three a media studies/television idea <br />
  • Developments to support HEFCE policy <br /> New deposit screenflow demonstrates that deposit takes under 3 minutes!
  • Following the strong visual identity – doesn’t have to cost the earth but is a great way to grab people’s attention and get them engaging with the system. <br /> Constant reminder on their desk! <br /> ‘Highlight your research’ – nice simple message that appeals to researchers vanity and can get better results.
  • Spent over £50,000 in the last two months!
  • ES <br /> To successfully complete the course students must: <br /> Introduce themselves in the course forum <br /> Complete all three core modules (in order) <br /> Complete at least two option modules <br /> Tutor support was provided everyday through the core modules and first 4 weeks of the options <br /> Tutor support ranged from responses to the forum posts <br />
  • Way of looking at things a different way – “When depressed or confused, try lying on your back with your legs in the air; sometimes the world just looks better upside-down” – The Cat’s Little Instruction Book by Leigh Rutledge.
  • Library to author and to publisher <br /> make sure you’re paying for what you’re getting and getting what you’re paying for! <br /> Open Access is not a drug but the use of some of the rhetoric is inevitable! <br /> Just keep getting the message out there! <br /> Try as many different approaches as your imagination (and budget) allows <br /> Aim for an institutional mandate <br /> Make the most of champions <br /> Personal contact can have more impact than a mass mailing <br /> Allow researchers to engage with training when it suits them

"Open Access at the Coal Face: attitudes and practical responses" Yvonne Budden, DARTS4 "Open Access at the Coal Face: attitudes and practical responses" Yvonne Budden, DARTS4 Presentation Transcript

  • Open Access at the Coal Face – Attitudes and Practical Responses Yvonne Budden University of Warwick and UKCoRR DARTS4 Conference, Dartington Hall, Totnes. 6th June 2014
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Overview • Setting the scene • Open Access at the University of Warwick • United Kingdom Council of Research Repositories • Top tips! • Where next and future plans
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Current Developments in the UK
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Future Developments • SHARE / CHORUS – Which approach will be taken by the US? • Horizon 2020 – European Commission mandate • REF2020 Open Access Mandate – What will implementation look like? • Reporting on RCUK Mandate – Can we prove 45% compliance? – What will reporting look like? • Open Access monographs – How will they change the landscape?
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Discussion • How have these developments affected your services? • What are the attitudes of your researchers to open access? • What are the issues/concerns for your institution generally?
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Attitudes to Open Access • 79.4% of responders in favour of OA principles • 70.8% have made work open access – Of those 67.1% used WRAP • 70.4% believe copyright of articles should remain with the author • 93.5% keep a copy of the AAM • 48.6% are happy with CC-BY licenses for their work
  • connecting you with information, support and your community However… • Real concerns about: – ‘Gold’ open access and effect on research funds – Intellectual property rights and copyright – Quality of ‘pure’ open access journals – Time needed and difficulty of navigating policies and processes – Concerns projects jointly funded by RCUK and commercial companies
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Some comments… “I think I just need someone to sit me down and make me hunt through the computer for the files needed to put into wrap... It's a task I know I ought to do but never get round to” “I would just prefer to upload my accepted version on the arXiv web pages and on my own/group web pages. I think this whole business of paying journals is a gross waste of money.” “The problem is not whether to choose open access or not. The problem is that the current model where UK universities pay extra for open access and still pay the library subscription means we pay twice - and thus less money for actually doing the research. Also, I think at some point we need to move to a model where we actually pay the reviewers and editors.” “WRAP is excellent. It would be a good idea to send regular reminders to academics to update their deposited material. I am guilty of not doing this regularly.”
  • connecting you with information, support and your community The Warwick Context • Founded 1965 • Currently boasts: – 988 academics, 617 of which are research active – ~ 2,000 Postgraduate research students – DTCs, Institute of Advanced Study • In the 2011/12 year – Research grants and contracts = £85 million – HEFCE grant for research = £33 million
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Practical responses to OA • Institutional buy-in • Motto – ‘Advocacy, Advocacy, Advocacy’ • The ‘Rule of Three’ / Trebling – Need to tell people something – 3 different times – In 3 different ways – Before they remember
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Open Access @ Warwick • WRAP launched in 2008 • Publications service launched in 2011 • RCUK block grant awarded: – 2013/14 = £352,781 – 2014/15 = £415,036 • University of Warwick Open Access policy launched 1 April 2013 OA Buttons by h_pampel (made available under the Creative Commons Attibution Share-Alike 2.0 license.)
  • connecting you with information, support and your community WRAP growth 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 No. Added Total Number
  • connecting you with information, support and your community WRAPping it up! • Services for researchers – Copyright checking and assurance – WRAP@mydesk and weekly drop-in sessions – Monitoring alerts and soliciting deposits – Auto-generated publication lists - http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk/view/author_id/757 7.html • Training events and tools • Metadata changes • New ‘Data Registry’
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Deposit incentives… Image © Yvonne Budden, 2012
  • connecting you with information, support and your community RCUK Grant Management • Dedicated member of staff • Coordinates, developed and delivers targeted advocacy for ‘gold’ OA particularly • Oversees the allocations from the RCUK and Wellcome Trust Grants – Follows the process from allocation to journal publication • Works closely with financial colleagues to ensure invoice payments • Liaises closely with Publisher colleagues as well
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Other activities… • Hosted publisher events • ‘Exchanges – The Warwick Research Journal’ – http://exchanges.warwick.ac.uk – Partnership between the Library and Institute of Advanced Study – Journal hosted on OJS – Training and publishing for ECRs – Innovative formats of articles – Features ‘conversations’ or ‘exchanges’ – Gold OA without a fee
  • connecting you with information, support and your community • New Moodle course looking at key tools aimed at PGRs and ECRs • 3 core modules • 7 option modules available flexibly • Tutor support via forums
  • connecting you with information, support and your community OA Collaboration • Student Careers and Skills – Publication strategy training – ‘Hot Topics’ sessions • Graduate School – PGR training around deposit of theses • Research Support Services – Training for staff supporting researchers in grant preparation – WRAP linkup with Research Information System
  • connecting you with information, support and your community The ‘Cat’s Eye View’ • Promote the use of OA materials • Make sure OA resources are listed in your catalogue • Link OA promotion to other work: – REF preparations – Research Data Management – PhD Supervisors Training
  • connecting you with information, support and your community UKCoRR – Support for repository staff • Dedicated community • Use of closed email discussion list to create a ‘safe’ space – Discussions cover practicalities, theory and latest developments • Yearly member’s events – Presentations and videos of the sessions openly available on our website: – http://ukcorr.org
  • connecting you with information, support and your community UKCoRR – advocacy and engagement • Representative body for repository staff undertakes advocacy in this area – 2 x Government consultation responses – 2 x HEFCE Consultation responses – Continued work with HEFCE on their policy FAQs • Work in Jisc coordinated groups covering their areas of activity in this area and more generally
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Discussion • If you could give the group one ‘top tip’ from your experience, what would it be? • What approaches have worked for your institution? • What other things would you like to try?
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Open Access – Top Tips (DARTS Edition) • …
  • connecting you with information, support and your community OA Top Tips • You are the expert – believe in this! • Use the ‘rule of three’ – keep getting the message out there • Personal contacts can be more successful than mass mailings • Prove it! – Case studies, statistics, citation score information • Track the process – can be more time consuming than you’d think
  • connecting you with information, support and your community OA Top Tips • Try as many different approaches as your imagination (and budget) allows • This is a sensitive topic and people are reacting to it differently • Get on the lists! – There’s no such things as a stupid question! • Judge when to be cautious • Get involved: – UKCoRR, SPARC, CILIP
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Where next for us? • Survey has given us much food for thought! • Continue to work on processes • My may have won over the ‘hearts’ but the ‘minds’ may be some time coming • New Research Information System • And as always…
  • connecting you with information, support and your community
  • connecting you with information, support and your community Thanks for listening! Yvonne Budden Academic Support Manager (Research) Chair, UK Council for Research Repositories y.c.budden@warwick.ac.uk +44 2476 151275