Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e
Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e
Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e
Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e
Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e
Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e
Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e
Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e
Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e
Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e
Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e
Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e
Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Nutrition che slide handout 6 per page e

201

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
201
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Looking Beyond the Basics of  Infant Nutrition Learning Objectives By the end of this session, physicians will  be able to: – Identify the importance of counselling on  infant nutrition – Recognize that optimizing infant nutrition  requires considerations beyond the basics Such that they will: – Consistently, proactively and confidently  counsel on optimal infant nutrition Why do we need to counsel on infant nutrition? Why wouldn’t we counsel on infant nutrition? Why We Should Counsel on Infant Nutrition Growth and development are rapid in  early life1,2 Certain nutritional components are  associated with development and  health3‐6 Early nutrition counseling may: – Help optimize development – Provide the foundation for lifelong nutrition 1. Jung E, et al. Am J Clin Nutr 1985;42(2):182‐9. 2. Bowden VR, et al. Children and their families: the continuum of care. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010. 3. Morale SE, et al. Early Hum Dev 2005;81:197‐203. 4. Birch EE, et al. Am J Clin Nutr 2010;91(4):848‐59. 5. Ward LM, et al. CMAJ 2007;177(2):161‐6. 6. American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition. Pediatrics 1999; 104(1):119‐23. The Basics Macronutrients in breast milk Macronutrients in Breast Milk, The Gold Standard of Infant Nutrition Adapted from Kleinman RE, ed. Pediatric Nutrition Handbook. 6th ed. Elk Grove Village, IL: AAP; 2009.
  • 2. Macronutrient Composition of  Breast Milk Nutrient % of  calories1 Important Characteristics Protein  6% Protein composition: Intact Whey:casein ratio: 60:402* Carbohydrate 43% Primary source: Lactose1 >200 oligo‐ and polysaccharides3 Lipids  51% Polyunsaturated fatty acids: DHA [omega‐3]  = 0.32% of total fatty acids4† ARA [omega‐6] = 0.47% of total fatty acids4† *Whey:casein ratio of typical mature breast milk (15 days to 6 months after birth); † Average level of DHA and ARA in  breast milk (mean ± standard deviation of total fatty acids) based on an analysis of 65 studies of 2,474 women. Adapted from: 1.Kleinman RE, ed. Pediatric Nutrition Handbook. 6th ed. Elk Grove Village, IL: AAP; 2009. 2.Kunz C, et al: Acta Paediatr 1992; 81:107‐12. 3.Niñonuevo MR, et al: J Agric Food Chem 2006; 54:7471‐80. 4.Brenna JT, et al: Am J Clin Nutr 2007; 85:1457‐64. Growth Charts for Length, Weight & Head  Circumference: 0 – 24 Months Downloaded from www.dietitians.ca/growthcharts, April 2012. Beyond the Basics Infant Nutrition is More Than Just Calories! Health (Modulates host protective mechanisms) Health (Modulates host protective mechanisms) Development and CognitionDevelopment and Cognition The Importance of Infant Nutrition Expert opinion: Drs. David Mack and Valerie Marchand, 2012. Body growthBody growth The basics The basics Specific Organ HealthSpecific Organ Health Beyond the  basics Beyond the  basics Dietary  Intake Dietary  Intake Mother's milk: A Potential Goldmine of Components harmacol Ther 1994;62(1‐2):193‐220. dscape Reference: Drugs, Diseases and Procedures. Updated December 4, 2010. Breast  milk Breast  milk FatsFats CarbohydratesCarbohydrates Human milk immunoglobulins Human milk immunoglobulins Fat‐soluble vitaminsFat‐soluble vitamins Other immunologic components Other immunologic components MineralsMinerals Water‐soluble vitaminsWater‐soluble vitamins EnzymesEnzymes Growth modulatorsGrowth modulators ProteinsProteins Components of Breast Milk To Be Reviewed Adapted from:  Bates CJ, et al. Pharmacol Ther 1994;62(1‐2):193‐220. Wagner CL: Medscape Reference: Drugs, Diseases and Procedures. Updated December 4, 2010. FatsFats CarbohydratesCarbohydrates Human milk immunoglobulins Human milk immunoglobulins Fat‐soluble vitaminsFat‐soluble vitamins Other immunologic components Other immunologic components MineralsMinerals Water‐soluble vitaminsWater‐soluble vitamins EnzymesEnzymes Growth modulatorsGrowth modulators ProteinsProteins Breast milk DHA & ARA DHA & ARA PrebioticsPrebiotics Vitamin DVitamin D IronIron
  • 3. Health (Modulates host  protective mechanisms) Health (Modulates host  protective mechanisms) Development and  Cognition Development and  Cognition Specific Organ HealthSpecific Organ Health Components of Breast Milk Studied: Fats Expert opinion: Drs. David Mack and Valerie Marchand, 2012. Adapted from:  Bates CJ, et al. Pharmacol Ther 1994;62(1‐2):193‐220. Wagner CL: Medscape Reference: Drugs, Diseases and Procedures. Updated December 4, 2010. FatsFats CarbohydratesCarbohydrates Human milk immunoglobulins Human milk immunoglobulins Fat‐soluble vitaminsFat‐soluble vitamins Other immunologic components Other immunologic components MineralsMinerals Water‐soluble vitaminsWater‐soluble vitamins EnzymesEnzymes Growth modulatorsGrowth modulators ProteinsProteins Dietary  Intake Dietary  Intake DHA & ARA DHA & ARA Omega‐3, ‐6 and ‐9 Fatty Acids Omega‐6 Linoleic acid ↓ γ‐linolenic acid ↓ Dihomo‐γ‐linolenic acid ↓ Arachidonic acid (ARA) Omega‐6 Linoleic acid ↓ γ‐linolenic acid ↓ Dihomo‐γ‐linolenic acid ↓ Arachidonic acid (ARA) Omega‐3 α‐linolenic acid (ALA) ↓ Octadecatetraenoic acid ↓ Eicosatetraenoic acid ↓ Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) ↓ Docosapentaenoic acid ↓ Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) Omega‐3 α‐linolenic acid (ALA) ↓ Octadecatetraenoic acid ↓ Eicosatetraenoic acid ↓ Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) ↓ Docosapentaenoic acid ↓ Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) Omega‐9 Oleic acid ↓ Octadecadienoic acid ↓ Eicosadienoic acid ↓ Eicosatrienoic acid Omega‐9 Oleic acid ↓ Octadecadienoic acid ↓ Eicosadienoic acid ↓ Eicosatrienoic acid Adapted from: 1. Tvrzicka E, et al. Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub 2011;155(2):117‐30. 2.Das UN. Curr Pharm Biotechnol 2006;7(6):467‐82. 3.Wallis JG, et al. Trends Biochem Sci 2002;27:467‐73. 4.Russo GL. Biochem Pharmacol 2009;77(6):937‐46. • Fatty acids not synthesized by humans:1 – Linoleic (omega‐6): fatty acid with 18 carbons  and 2 double bonds – 18:2 (9,12) – Linolenic (omega‐3): fatty acid with 18  carbons and 3 double bonds – 18:3 (9,12,15) • Requirements: 2‐3% of daily calories2 Essential Fatty Acids: Omega‐3 and Omega‐6 Adapted from: 1. Das UN: Curr Pharm Biotechnol 2006;7(6):467‐82. 2. Expert opinion: Drs. David Mack and Valerie Marchand, 2012. H H H H H HH H H H H H H H H HH H H H H H H H C C C C C CC C C C C C C CH H H H C C C H O OH C Metabolism of DHA and ARA: Important Building  Blocks of the Developing Brain and Immune System Arachidonic acid (ARA) Eicosanoids (mainly pro‐inflammatory) Omega‐6: Linoleic acid (LA) Membranes throughout the body, including brain and immune cells Adapted from Serhan CN, Savill J. Nature Immunol 2005;12:1191‐7. Immune  Cells Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) Eicosanoids (anti‐inflammatory) Omega‐3: ‐linolenic acid (ALA) Physiologic Mediators Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) Membranes (especially in retina and other brain cells) Docosanoids (anti‐inflammatory) LCPUFAs Preformed DHA Allows for more Predictable  Bioavailability Compared to Converted DHA Intake of biochemical precursor: Alpha‐linolenic acid (short‐chain omega‐3 fat) 1. Innis SM. Early Hum Dev 2007;83(12):761‐6. >> in utero in breast milk in supplemented infant formula DHA Endogenous synthesis Conversion rate is very low  (< 1% of alpha‐linolenic acid is converted to DHA)1 DHA Preformed DHA… Prenatal Nutrition is Critical: Important  Neurologic Developments In Utero Domain Developments Cognitive 100 billion neurons form Eyes develop and make movements Motor Arms and legs move Thumb sucking Development of touch Language Mouth opens and closes Response to sounds Social skills Response and habituation to familiar sounds Adapted from Herschkowitz N, et al: A Good Start in Life: Understanding Your Child’s Brain and Behavior from Birth to Age 6. 2004.
  • 4. Adapted from Dobbing J, et al. J Arch Dis Child 1973; 48:757‐67. Brain Growth is Rapid in the Last  Trimester and First 2 Years of Life ‐6 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 400 800 1200 1600 Age (months) Brain Weight (grams) Term ~+260%  ~+175% ~+18% Adult ~+21% Adapted from Martinez M. J Pediatr 1992;120(suppl):S129‐38. Differential Accumulation of Omega‐3 Fats in the Brain: DHA is the Key 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 ‐20 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Postnatal Age (weeks) w‐3 LCPUFA (mcmolin forebrain) DPA DHA EPA Placenta Diet and Synthesis DHA DPA EPA DHA is an Important Building Block of the Growing Brain Adapted from Martinez M. J Pediatr 1992;120(suppl):S129‐38. Changes in the Brain Help to Foster  Development in Early Life Adapted from: 1. Eliot L. What’s Going on in There? How the Brain and Mind Develop in the First Five Years of Life; 1999. 2. McDevitt TM, et al. Child Development: Educating and Working With Children and Adolescents. 2nd ed.; 2003. 3. Restak R. The Secret Life of the Brain; 2001. 4. Shonkoff JP, ed. Handbook of Early Childhood Intervention. 2nd ed.; 2000. 5. Drover JR, et al. Child Dev 2009;80:1376‐84.  The motor cortex  develops and  connects to nerve  pathways throughout  the body, facilitating  advancing motor  control.1 The motor cortex  develops and  connects to nerve  pathways throughout  the body, facilitating  advancing motor  control.1 With more neural  connections and  faster processing in  the occipital lobe,  vision becomes more  refined over time.1,2 With more neural  connections and  faster processing in  the occipital lobe,  vision becomes more  refined over time.1,2 Neurons plug into  different areas of the  brain contributing to  language  development.3 Neurons plug into  different areas of the  brain contributing to  language  development.3 As neurons build  stronger connections in  the prefrontal cortex,  higher level thinking  emerges, including  attention, forethought,  planning, and problem  solving.1,4,5 As neurons build  stronger connections in  the prefrontal cortex,  higher level thinking  emerges, including  attention, forethought,  planning, and problem  solving.1,4,5 The developing frontal  cortex coordinates  emotional connections.  As it matures, children  begin to feel and show  affection.1 The developing frontal  cortex coordinates  emotional connections.  As it matures, children  begin to feel and show  affection.1 Neurocognitive Benefits of Recommended Levels  of DHA in Infant Formula vs. Formula with no DHA *Studies compared infants formula containing DHA and ARA (0.32% and 0.64%) and formula without DHA and ARA. Adapted from: 1.Koletzko B, et al. J Perinat Med 2008;36:5‐14. 2.Colombo J, et al. Ped Res 2011;70:406‐10 3.Drover JR, et al. Child Dev 2009;80:1376‐84. 4.Morale SE, et al. Early Hum Develop 2005;81:197‐203. 5.Birch EE, et al. Dev Med Child Neurol 2000;42:174‐81. Expert‐ recommended  level of DHA1* Expert‐ recommended  level of DHA1* Improved visual acuity  at 12 months4* Improved visual acuity  at 12 months4* 38% longer sustained attention  at 9 months2* 38% longer sustained attention  at 9 months2* Improved problem solving: 63% more successes at 9 months3* Improved problem solving: 63% more successes at 9 months3* Improvement in Mental Development Index  scores at 18 months5* Improvement in Mental Development Index  scores at 18 months5* DHA Intakes of Pregnant Canadian  Women Are Very Low *Trace amount (<2 mg/d) †Recommended intake for pregnant women (Koletzko B, et al. J Perinat Med 2008;36:5‐14.) Adapted from Denomme J, et al. J Nutr 2005;135(2):206‐11.   Study Participants (n=20) DHA Intake (mg/day) * † 700 100 200 300 400 600 500 * * * Individual results Group mean result
  • 5. Recommended Dietary DHA and ARA  Intake for Pregnant and Lactating Women Adapted from Koletzko B, et al. J Perinat Med 2008;36:5‐14. • ≥ 200 mg of dietary /  supplemental DHA  • ARA intake should be  equivalent to DHA Expert Positions for DHA and ARA Levels  in Term Infant Formulas DHA ARA World Assoc. of Perinatal Med./Early Nutrition  Academy/Child Health Foundation (2008)1 0.2‐0.5 ≥0.2  American Dietetic Association (ADA) and  Dietitians of Canada (DC) position (2007)2 ≥0.2 ≥0.2 Child Health Foundation, Germany (2001)3 ≥0.2 ≥0.35 Expert panel convened by ISSFAL (1999)4 ~0.35 ~0.5 British Nutrition Foundation (1992)6 ~0.4 ~0.4 Adapted from: 1. Koletzko B, et al. J Perinat Med 2008;36:5‐14. 2. Kris‐Etherton PM, et al. J Am Diet Assoc 2007;107:1599‐1611. 3. Koletzko B, et al. Acta Paediatr 2001;90:460‐4. 4. Simopoulos AP, et al. J Am Coll Nutr 1999;18:487‐9. 5. FAO/WHO Joint Expert Consultation. Lipids in Early Development. FAO Food and Nutr Pap 1994;57:49‐55. 6. The British Nutrition Foundation. Unsaturated Fatty Acids: Nutritional and Physiological Significance. London, England: Chapman & Hall; 1992:152‐163.  DHA & ARA: Implications for Counselling DHA & ARA are important building blocks for brain  and eye development1‐4 For pregnant women and nursing mothers: Diet  should include DHA‐rich foods / supplements5 For formula‐fed infants: ─ Formulas containing DHA and ARA should be  preferred over non‐supplemented formulas6 ─ Ensure that the formula has DHA and ARA levels  within the range demonstrated to have an  impact on outcomes6 1. Colombo J, et al. Ped Res 2011;70:406‐10. 2. Drover JR, et al. Child Dev 2009;80:1376‐84. 3. Morale SE, et al. Early Hum Dev 2005;81:197‐203. 4. Birch EE, et al. Dev Med Child Neurol 2000;42:174‐81. 5. Koletzko B, et al. J Perinat Med 2008;36:5‐14. 6. Expert opinion: Drs. David Mack and Valerie Marchand, 2012. Health (Modulates host  protective mechanisms) Health (Modulates host  protective mechanisms) Development and  Cognition Development and  Cognition Specific Organ HealthSpecific Organ Health Components of Breast Milk Studied: Fat‐soluble Vitamins Fat‐soluble vitaminsFat‐soluble vitamins FatsFats CarbohydratesCarbohydrates Human milk immunoglobulins Human milk immunoglobulins Other immunologic components Other immunologic components MineralsMinerals Water‐soluble vitaminsWater‐soluble vitamins EnzymesEnzymes Growth modulatorsGrowth modulators ProteinsProteins Dietary  Intake Dietary  Intake Vitamin D Vitamin D Expert opinion: Drs. David Mack and Valerie Marchand, 2012. Adapted from:  Bates CJ, et al. Pharmacol Ther 1994;62(1‐2):193‐220. Wagner CL: Medscape Reference: Drugs, Diseases and Procedures. Updated December 4, 2010. Vitamin D‐Deficiency Rickets in Canadian  Children Incidence: 2.9 per 100,000  – 104 confirmed cases (2002‐2004) – Mean age at diagnosis: 1.4 years Risk factors for children: – Of the 94% of children that were breastfed  89% of these did not receive Vitamin D  supplementation – 89% were of intermediate or dark skin Maternal contributing factors: – Limited sun exposure – Lack of vitamin D (diet, supplements) during  pregnancy or lactation Adapted from Ward LM, et al. CMAJ 2007; 177(2):161‐6. © 2011 Mead Johnson Nutrition [Canada] Co. Vitamin D in Breast Milk  Breast milk contains almost all the  nutrients a growing infant requires,  but can be low in vitamin D Hollis BW, et al: J Nutr 1981; 111(7):1240‐8.
  • 6. Vitamin D: Implications for Counselling For nursing mothers:  – Supplement diet to achieve intake of at least  600 IU daily1 For breastfed infants: – Daily supplement of 400 IU1 – Infants who receive limited amounts of  formula as supplemental feeds likely still  require vitamin D supplementation to meet  daily requirements For formula fed infants: – Formulas provide adequate vitamin D – no  further supplementation is required2 1. Health Canada.Vitamin D and Calcium: Updated Dietary Reference Intakes. Accessed on‐line April, 2012. www.hc‐sc.gc.ca 2. Canadian  Paediatric  Society. Paediatric Child Health 2007;12:583‐9. Health (Modulates host  protective mechanisms) Health (Modulates host  protective mechanisms) Development and  Cognition Development and  Cognition Specific Organ HealthSpecific Organ Health Components of Breast Milk Studied:  Minerals  MineralsMinerals Fat‐soluble vitaminsFat‐soluble vitamins FatsFats CarbohydratesCarbohydrates Human milk immunoglobulins Human milk immunoglobulins Other immunologic components Other immunologic components Water‐soluble vitaminsWater‐soluble vitamins EnzymesEnzymes Growth modulatorsGrowth modulators ProteinsProteins Dietary  Intake Dietary  Intake IronIron Expert opinion: Drs. David Mack and Valerie Marchand, 2012. Adapted from:  Bates CJ, et al. Pharmacol Ther 1994;62(1‐2):193‐220. Wagner CL: Medscape Reference: Drugs, Diseases and Procedures. Updated December 4, 2010. Effects of Iron Deficiency on Growth and  Development Short‐term1‐4 Poor weight gain1 Weakness and muscle  fatigue2 Abnormal GI motility2 Irritability and shorter  attention span3,4 Exercise intolerance and  lower physical activity3 Longer‐term5‐7 Motor development sensitive  to mild‐iron deficiency  anemia Reduction in cognitive ability  and mental skills in severe  and chronic iron deficiency Poor school performance in  middle school associated  with early childhood anemia Evidence does not specify  specific cognitive deficitsAdapted from: 1. Aukett MA, et al. Arch Dis Child 1986;61(9):849‐57. 2. American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition: Pediatrics 1999;104(1):119‐23. 3. Wu AC, et al. Screening for iron deficiency. Pediatr Rev 2002;23(5):171‐8. 4. Lozoff B. Bull N Y Acad Med 1989;65(10):1050‐66. 5. Booth IW, et al. Arch Dis Child 1997;76:549‐53. 6. Beard JL, et al. Nutr Rev 1993;51:157‐70. 7. Grantham‐McGregor S, et al. J Nutr 2001;131:S649‐68. Signs/Symptoms of Iron Deficiency  Anemia Clinical signs are helpful only in severe cases In mild iron deficiency, laboratory tests may be  less reliable; values overlap with iron‐sufficient  individuals Oski F. N Engl J Med 1993;329(3):190‐3. Signs / Symptoms of moderately severe iron deficiency ↓ mean cell volume ↓ serum ferritin level ↓ serum iron level ↑ serum iron‐binding capacity ↑ red‐cell protoporphyrin level ↑ red‐cell distribution width ↑ hemoglobin concentration after institution of iron therapy Iron: Implications for Counselling—Breastfeeding Full‐term breastfed infants do not require  iron supplementation1 – Breast milk is relatively low in iron, but it is  bioavailable (20‐50%)1 – Level of iron in breast milk declines over time1 Introduce solid foods as recommended at 6 months (starting with iron‐fortified  cereal)2 1. Griffin IJ, et al. Pediatr Clin North Am 2001; 48(2):401‐13. 2. Health Canada. Nutrition for Healthy Term Infants ‐ Statement of the Joint Working Group: Canadian Paediatric Society, Dietitians of Canada and Health  Canada. Ottawa 2005. Iron: Implications for Counselling—Formula Feeding Infant formulas are iron fortified and so contain  adequate concentrations of exogenous iron1 – Higher levels required due to relatively low  bioavailability (3‐10%)1 – No additional iron supplementation is  required in full term infants2 – There is no indication for non‐iron‐fortified  infant formula Introduce solid foods as recommended at 6  months (starting with iron‐fortified cereal)3 Cow milk not recommended until 12 months of  age2 Adapted from: 1. Faldella G, et al: Acta Paediatr Suppl 2003; 91(441):82‐5. 2. Baker RD, et al: Pediatrics 2010; 126(5):1040‐50. 3. Health Canada. Nutrition for Healthy Term Infants ‐ Statement of the Joint Working Group: Canadian Paediatric Society, Dietitians of Canada and Health  Canada. Ottawa 2005.
  • 7. Components of Breast Milk Studied:  Carbohydrates Expert opinion: Drs. David Mack and Valerie Marchand, 2012. Adapted from:  Bates CJ, et al. Pharmacol Ther 1994;62(1‐2):193‐220. Wagner CL: Medscape Reference: Drugs, Diseases and Procedures. Updated December 4, 2010. Health (Modulates host  protective mechanisms) Health (Modulates host  protective mechanisms) Development and  Cognition Development and  Cognition Specific Organ HealthSpecific Organ Health CarbohydratesCarbohydrates Fat‐soluble vitaminsFat‐soluble vitamins FatsFats Human milk immunoglobulins Human milk immunoglobulins Other immunologic components Other immunologic components MineralsMinerals Water‐soluble vitaminsWater‐soluble vitamins EnzymesEnzymes Growth modulatorsGrowth modulators ProteinsProteins Dietary  Intake Dietary  Intake PrebioticsPrebiotics Microbiota Development in Infants Microbiota is essential for GI and immune  development Colonization begins during early life,  affected by delivery method, feeding &  gestational age1 – Diversity of microbiota affects immune  maturation2 1. Penders J, et al. Pediatrics 2006;118(2):511‐21. 2. Adlerberth I, et al. Acta Paediatr 2009;98(2):229‐38. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are food for friendly  bacteria like Bifidobacterium infantis. Shorter chain HMOs in  particular are almost entirely consumed by this microbe. Milk Macro‐/Micronutrients HMOs 1010 88 77 66 99 88 55 44 Other HMOs of longer lengths Proportion eaten by B. infantis Chain length Prebiotics in Breast Milk: Human Milk Oligosaccharides Adapted from Petherik A, et al. Nature 2010;468:S5‐S7. Human Milk Oligosaccharides (HMOs) Large component of breast milk (5‐10 g/L) Complex mixture of galacto‐ oligosaccharides Bifidogenic properties Concentration affects microbiome composition Normally, not present in infant formulas – Rationale for adding prebiotics to formula:  functional substitution for HMOs 1. Zivkovic AM, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2011;108 Suppl 1:4653‐8. 2. Coppa GV, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2011;53(1):80‐7. Beneficial Bacteria Play a Key Role in  Inhibiting Pathogens in the GI Tract Adapted from: Knol J, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2005;40(1):36‐42.  Niers L, et al: Nutr Rev 2007;65(8 Pt 1):347‐60. Microbiota Development: Prebiotics vs. Probiotics Prebiotics Probiotics Definition Nondigestible food  ingredients that  selectively stimulate the  growth and/or activity of  a limited number of  bacteria in the colon that  are thought beneficial to  host health1 Live microorganisms  which, when  administered in  adequate amounts,  confer a health  benefit Purpose in  Infant Nutrition Functional substitution  for human milk  oligosaccharides Specific probiotics are useful for  specific conditions,  including cow milk  protein allergy and  diarrhea Adapted from Roberfroid M. J Nutr 2007;137(3 Suppl 2):830S‐7S.
  • 8. Actions of Prebiotics Expert opinion Dr. David Mack, Adapted from Sherman P, et al. J Pediatr 2009;155:S61‐70. Prebiotic e.g., fructooligosaccharides, galactooligosaccharides, polydextrose, lactulose Prebiotic e.g., fructooligosaccharides, galactooligosaccharides, polydextrose, lactulose Colonic microbia ↑ Bifidobacteria ↑ Lactobacillii Colonic microbia ↑ Bifidobacteria ↑ Lactobacillii Energy source for colonocytes Energy source for colonocytes Enhanced absorption of calciumEnhanced absorption of calcium Reduced pHReduced pH Short‐chain fatty acids Short‐chain fatty acids Lactic acid Lactic acid Antimicrobial effect Antimicrobial effect Health maintenance Health maintenance Health benefit (e.g., softer, more bulky stools Health benefit (e.g., softer, more bulky stools Not digested or absorbed in stomach or small intestine Fermentation of carbohydrates Prebiotic Supplementation of Formula for Full‐term Infants: Systematic Review of 11 RCTs Stools softer (5 of 5 trials)  Stools more frequent (3 of 3 trials) and similar to  number of breastfed infants  Stool pH lowered (7 of 8 trials) – Weighted average ‐0.65 (95% CI ‐0.76 to ‐ 0.54) Stool Bifidobacteria increased (6 of 9 trials) Prebiotics studied:  – GOS, FOS, long chain FOS, PDX, lactulose – Combinations or singly, total prebiotic:  0.3 g/dL‐0.8 g/dL n=1,459 Rao S, et al. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2009;163(8):755‐64. Prebiotic Blend of GOS/PDX in Full‐Term  Healthy Infants: Study Summary Methodology: 60‐day intervention study 230 healthy, full‐term infants, aged 21‐30 days Randomized to formula with GOS/PDX prebiotics or control  formula with no prebiotics (also, a breast milk control arm) Results:  Primary: No significant differences between formulas in  Bifidobacteria counts at 60 days (FISH analysis) Secondary: GOS/PDX formula was associated with: – Higher Bifidobacteria counts than control at 60 days and similar to breast milk fed (qPCR analysis) – Softer stools at all time points Scalabrin DM, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2012;54(3):343‐52. Current Expert Consensus Opinions on  Prebiotic‐Supplemented Infant Formulas More data are required for  recommendation of prebiotics in formula  (AAP and ESPGHAN)1,2 No safety concerns (growth or adverse  effects) with prebiotic supplementation  (ESPGHAN)2 1. Thomas DW, et al. Pediatrics 2010;126(6):1217‐31. 2. Braegger C, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2011;52(2):238‐50. Prebiotics: Implications for Counselling For nursing mothers: – Diversity o Breast milk oligosaccharides o Infant microbiota o Importance? For formula‐fed infants: – Evidence shows softer stool consistency – Work underway regarding other outcomes Other Important Aspects of  Nutrition Counselling
  • 9. Other Mammalian Milks Do Not Have the  Proper Balance for Infant Nutrition Appropriate  Breast milk  Infant formula Not Appropriate X Cow's milk X Other mammalian  milks (e.g., goat) X Plant‐based  beverages (e.g., soy,  rice, almond, hemp) Health Canada. Nutrition for Healthy Term Infants ‐ Statement of the Joint Working Group: Canadian Paediatric Society, Dietitians of Canada  and Health Canada. Ottawa 2005. What if we had an acronym/  reminder to help us counsel  parents? What could it be? Helping Parents be Proactive in Infant Nutrition:  COUNSEL: A Mnemonic Counselling Tool C Confirm that breastfeeding is the preferred primary source  of infant nutrition. O Optimize the mother's nutritional intake: recommend a  balanced, healthy diet. U Underline the importance of certain components of the  maternal diet (DHA and vitamin D). N Never use other milks (e.g., cow, goat, plant‐based) as the  primary infant food. S Supplement the breastfeeding infant’s diet with vitamin D,  400 IU daily. E Educate all parents about formula feeding: choose formula  with adequate DHA & ARA levels, consider formula with  prebiotics. L Labels: Encourage parents to read formula labels to ensure  levels of DHA & ARA proven to have an effect on health &  development. Beyond the Basics of Infant  Nutrition Summary Key Learning Points from This Session (1) Healthcare professionals need to counsel  parents on infant nutrition.  Why  Wouldn't We? Breastfeeding mothers need: To eat a healthy diet. Adequate DHA from diet / supplements. To supplement the infant's diet with vitamin D. Key Learning Points from This Session (2) When transitioning off breast milk (or  choosing not to breastfeed): Iron‐fortified formula is the food of choice. Choose formula with appropriate levels of  DHA & ARA. Consider choosing formula with prebiotics.
  • 10. The Future of Infant Nutrition We Are What We Eat… Future Understanding Nutrients can modify physiologic and  pathologic processes through epigenetic  mechanisms and thus potentially play a  role in disease prevention and maintenance  of health. ‐ Choi SW, et al. Adv Nutr 2010 (Epigenetics refers to the heritable changes in gene expression  that change the underlying DNA sequence. Examples are DNA  methylation and histone modification.) We Are What We Eat… Future Understanding The human component of the total DNA  in our bodies is 0.3%1 The other 99.7% is of microbial origin1 The intestinal microbiota may be  influenced by dietary intake2,3 The human gut microbiome (the  collective community of microbes and  their total genome capacity) have been  implicated in health and disease4 Adapted from: 1. Qin J, et al. Nature 2010;464(7285):59‐65. 2. Hehemann JH, et al. Nature 2010;464(7290):908‐12.  3. Davis LM, et al: PLoS One 2011;6:e25200. 4. Young VB. Curr Opin Gastroenterol 2012;28:63‐9. Remember C.O.U.N.S.E.L. COUNSEL helps participants achieve one of this  program's key learning objectives: To be able to consistently, proactively and  confidently counsel on optimal infant nutrition. Supplemental Slides Improvement in Attention with  DHA‐Supplemented Formula Adapted from Colombo J, et al. Pediatr Res 2011;70(4):406‐10. 38% longer attention p<0.05 0.5 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0 0% DHA 0.32% DHA 0.412 0.298 Proportion of time spent in  sustained attention (9 months)
  • 11. Means‐End Problem Solving Improved in Babies Fed  DHA/ARA Supplemented Infant Formula 12‐Month Feeding, 6‐Week Weaning, or 4‐ to 6‐Month Weaning Adapted from Drover JR, et al. Child Dev 2009;80:1376‐84. Control Formula with DHA (DHA 0.36% & ARA 0.72%) Average intention score * * 10 9 8 6 5 7 4 2 1 0 12‐month feeding 6‐week weaning 4‐ to 6‐ month weaning 3 Intentional solutions (median) *p<0.05 †* * 3 2.5 3.5 2 1 0.5 0 12‐month feeding 6‐week weaning 4‐ to 6‐ month weaning 1.5 Longer Feeding with Dietary DHA (Breast Milk  or DHA/ARA Supplemented Formula) Improves  Visual Acuity Adapted from Morale SE, et al. Early Hum Dev 2005;81:197‐203. Dietary DHA for 52 weeks No dietary DHA for 52 weeks ~1.5‐line difference Sweep VEP Acuity  (SnellenValues) 20/50 20/40 20/30 20/25 Duration of Dietary DHA Supply (weeks) ~20/41  ~20/32  ~20/28~20/36  0 weeks 17 weeks 35 weeks 52 weeks Breast milk Formula with DHA (0.32%) Breast milk + formula with DHA (0.32%) Formulawith Iron DHA Levels and Mental Development: Bayley MDI Scores Adapted from: 1.Birch EE, et al. Dev Med Child Neurol 2000;42:174‐81. 2.Hoffman DR, et al. FASEB J 2003;17:A727‐A728. Abstract 445.1. 3.Auestad N, et al. Pediatrics 2001;108:372‐81. Birch/Hoffman Study MDI at 18 months Score *P < 0.05 vs. Control * * 105 0 95 100 Formula with DHA (0.36%) + ARA (0.72%) Control formula Breast milk (DHA 0.29% + ARA 0.56%) Auestad Study MDI at 12 months Norm 105 0 95 100 Formula with DHA (0.13%) + ARA (0.46%) Control formula Breast milk (DHA 0.12% + ARA 0.51%) Visual Acuity Corresponds with DHA Levels in Formula‐fed Infants p<0.002 or less at all ages n=294 at 1.5 months; n=268 at 4 months; n=253 at 9 months; n=241 at 12 months. Adapted from Birch EE, et al. Am J Clin Nutr 2010;91:848‐59. Sweep VEP Acuity (logMAR) Age (months) 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 0.00 0.20 Snellen 20/50 20/25 20/200 20/100 0.96 0.00 0.32 0.64 DHA level DHA and ARA Levels in Breast Milk Are Variable Adapted from: 1. Brenna JT, et al. Am J Clin Nutr 2007;85:1457‐64. 2. Auestad N, et al. Pediatrics 2001;108:372‐81. 3. Birch EE, et al. Pediatr Res 1998;44:201‐9.  4. Innis SM. J Pediatr 2003;143(4 Suppl):S1‐8. Location DHA (% fatty acids) ARA (% fatty acids) Japan 0.99 0.40 Philippines 0.74 0.39 Chile 0.43 0.42 China 0.35 0.49 Worldwide Mean (Brenna) 0.32 0.47 United States (Birch) 0.29 0.56 Mexico 0.26 0.42 Australia 0.23 0.38 Canada 0.17 0.37 United States (Auestad) 0.12 0.51 South Africa (rural) 0.10 1.00 0.5 0.2 Recommended Range for Term Formula  *mg/100 kcal Adapted from: 1.Koletzko B, et al. J Perinat Med 2008;36:5‐14.  2.Kris‐Etherton PM, et al. J Am Diet Assoc 2007;107:1599‐611. 3.Koletzko B, et al. Acta Paediatr 2001;90:460‐4. 4.Simopoulos AP, et al. J Am Coll Nutr 1999;18:487‐9. 5.The British Nutrition Foundation. Unsaturated Fatty Acids: Nutritional and physiological significance. London: Chapman & Hall; 1992:152‐63. 6.Agostoni C, et al. J Pediatr Gastr Nutr 2010;50:1‐9.  Expert Positions for DHA and ARA Levels  in Term and Preterm Infant Formulas Term (% fatty acids) Preterm (% fatty acids) DHA ARA DHA ARA World Assoc. of Perinatal Med./Early Nutrition  Academy/Child Health Foundation (2008)1 0.2–0.5 ≥0.2  ‐ ‐ American Dietetic Association (ADA) and  Dietitians of Canada (DC) position (2007)2 ≥0.2 ≥0.2 ‐ ‐ Child Health Foundation, Germany (2001)3 ≥0.2 ≥0.35 ≥0.35 ≥0.4 Expert panel convened by ISSFAL (1999)4 ~0.35 ~0.5 ~0.35 ~0.5 British Nutrition Foundation (1992)5 ~0.4 ~0.4 ~0.4 ~0.4 ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition (2010)6 ‐ ‐ 11 – 27* 16 – 39*
  • 12. DHA Omega‐3 Dietary Sources www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12354500 DHA Omega‐3 Dietary Sources Food DHA (mg) Milk (250 mL, DHA enriched) Up to 20 mg Egg (Omega‐3) Up to 125 mg Salmon (85 g or 3 oz, Coho, wild) 559 Salmon (85 g or 3 oz, Atlantic, farmed) 1238 Shrimp (12, large, steamed) 96 Sole (85 g or 3 oz, cooked) 219 Cod (85 g or 3 oz, Atlantic, cooked) 131 Health Canada Advisories on Fish Intake for Women  Who Are or Might Become Pregnant, or Who Are Breastfeeding 1.  Health Canada. Mercury in Fish: Consumption Advice. Available at: www.hc‐sc.gc.ca/fn‐ an/securit/chem‐chim/environ/mercur/cons‐adv‐etud_e.html. Accessed July 20, 2010. 2.  Health Canada Media Release (Feb 14, 2007). Health Canada advises specific groups to limit  their consumption of canned albacore tuna. Available at: www.hc‐sc.gc.ca/ahc‐ asc/media/advisories‐avis/_2007/2007_14‐‐e.php. Accessed July 20, 2010. Types of fish to eat less often Types of fish to choose High mercury, predatory fish • Shark • Swordfish • Fresh/frozen tuna • Marlin • Orange roughy • Escolar Other fish low in mercury & high in omega‐3 fatty  acids •Salmon    •Herring •Shrimp •Char •Atlantic mackerel •Rainbow trout •Canned light tuna (skipjack, yellowfin, tongol) Limit to 150 g / month1 Consume at least 150 g (2 Canada’s Food Guide  servings) per week1 Check provincial & local advisories about the safety of fish caught locally.  Consumption of canned (white) albacore tuna should be restricted to no more than  300 g  (4 Canada’s Food Guide servings) per week, but no restrictions on other types of  canned light tuna2 Formula with PDX/GOS Was Not Significantly  Different From Controls in Bifidobacteria Stool Counts  at 60 days When Analyzed by FISH (Primary Outcome) * Significantly different from control formula and PDX/GOS formula Adapted from Scalabrin DM, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2012;54(3):343‐52. * * 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Baseline 60‐Days Stool BifidibacteriaCounts (log10CFU/g stool) Control Formula BreastfedPrebiotic Formula Formula with PDX/GOS Has Bifidogenic Effect  When Analyzed by qPCR (Secondary Outcome) Measured by qPCR Adapted from Scalabrin DM, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2012;54(3):343‐52. 10 8 6 4 2 Baseline 60‐Days Bifidibacterium spp. (median log10CFU/g stool) NS P=0.025 P=0.033 P=0.002 NS P=0.001 Formula without prebiotics Breast MilkFormula with GOS / polydextrose Formula with PDX/GOS Has Stool  Softening Effect (Secondary Outcome) Differences were significantly different during  each time period.  Adapted from Scalabrin DM, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2012;54(3):343‐52. 5 4 3 2 1 1 to 15 16 to 30 31 to 45 46 + Watery Loose Formed Soft Hard Study period, days Stool consistency Breastfed Control Formula Formula with PDX/GOS Human Milk Oligosaccharides Content/Composition – 3rd largest component (5‐10 g/L mature  milk)1,2 – More than 200 human milk oligosaccharides  identified (evidence for >900)2 – Variation due to maternal genetics, lactation  stage3 Properties/Functions – Structurally diverse; variable composition – Digestion resistance; local and systemic  effects1 – Prebiotic – stimulates beneficial GI microbiota – Decoy receptors – toxins, pathogens1. Bode L. J Nutr 2006;136:2127‐30. 2. Ninonuevo MR, et al. J Agric Food Chem. 2006;54:7471‐80. 3. Chaturvedi P, et al. Glycobiol.2001;11:365‐72.
  • 13. Functions of Oligosaccharides  Prebiotics have special roles in maintaining the GI  barrier and GI immune homeostasis Oligosaccharides found in human milk: – Are more complex than those found in the  milk of other mammals1 – Are the most effective known prebiotics1 – Preferentially support the growth of  bifidobacteria2 Prebiotics added to infant formulas may have  clinical benefits, including lower incidence of  diarrhea and acute respiratory infection3‐5 1. Kunz C, et al. Annu Rev Nutr 2000;20:699‐722. 2. Zivkovic AM, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2011;108 Suppl 1:4653‐8. 3. Arslanoglu S, et al. J Nutr 2007;137:2420‐4. 4. Bruzzese E, et al. Clin Nutr 2009;28:156‐61. 5. Waligora‐Dupriet AJ, et al. Int J Food Microbiol 2007;113:108‐13. Criteria for Prebiotic Classification: 1. Resistance to gastric acid, enzyme  hydrolysis and intestinal absorption 2. Fermentation by intestinal microflora 3. Selective stimulation of growth (i.e., bifidogenic effect) and/or activity of  intestinal bacteria that contribute to health Gibson GR, et al. Nutr Res Rev 2004;17:257‐9. Canadian Recommendations for Vitamin D  Intake Age group  Recommended  Dietary Allowance  (RDA) per day Tolerable Upper  Intake Level (UL) per  day Infants 0‐6 months 400 IU (10 mcg)* 1000 IU (25 mcg) Infants 7‐12 months 400 IU (10 mcg)* 1500 IU (38 mcg) Children 1‐3 years 600 IU (15 mcg) 2500 IU (63 mcg) Children 4‐8 years 600 IU (15 mcg) 3000 IU (75 mcg) Children and adults 9‐70 years 600 IU (15 mcg) 4000 IU (100 mcg) Adults > 70 years 800 IU (20 mcg) 4000 IU (100 mcg) Pregnancy &  lactation 600 IU (15 mcg) 4000 IU (100 mcg) *Adequate Intake rather than Recommended Dietary Allowance. Health Canada: Vitamin D and Calcium: Updated Dietary Reference Intakes. Accessed on‐line April, 2012. www.hc‐sc.gc.ca

×