9/9 FRI 2:45 | Green Great Neighborhoods

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Stephen Tocknell
Corie Baker
Mary Tappouni
Leslie Olson

What can Green Neighborhoods and Great Neighborhoods learn from each other about sustainability? Leading experts in preservation and green building design will present case studies
that show how energy efficient development and construction practices of the past can work together to increase the energy efficiency of existing homes and neighborhoods, without undermining their historic character. The session will feature a takeaway design tool for retrofitting historic areas with new green technologies.

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  • Fuller Warren Bridge and its neo-Gothic arches provide shelter for the Riverside Arts Market, an all-weather outdoor venue for famers markets and events. The neighborhood is also served by five distinct commercial areas. Photo courtesy of Margaret Dick Tocknell.
  • Once threatened by commercial development, the neighborhood banded together to preserve its residential fabric. Riverside Avondale is home to Florida's most diverse collection of architecture. Photo courtesy of Margaret Dick Tocknell.
  • Situated on the banks of the St. Johns River, Memorial Park was designed by Olmsted Brothers firm and is a popular destination for recreational activities and relaxation. Photo courtesy of Margaret Dick Tocknell.
  • Moss-draped oak trees are common along Avondale's charming streets. The picturesque streetscape makes the neighborhood a haven for dog walkers, joggers and bikers. Photo courtesy of Margaret Dick Tocknell.
  • (L-R Stephen Tocknell, Bill Killingsworth, Wayne Wood, Mayor John Peyton, CM Warren Jones)
  • (L-R: Wayne Wood (standing), Steve Tocknell, Mayor Peyton, CM Warren Jones, Bill Killingsworth)
  • Our buildings have a tremendous impact on the natural environment in key areas such as embodied energy, energy consumption, emissions and waste. Read bullets above Reusing and retrofitting our existing buildings can reduce these impacts
  • Consider this….. Read bullets above
  • The way that are communities are laid out, their location and proximity to other neighborhoods and services is just as important as the quality of our buildings. The benefits to investing in our historic neighborhoods reaches beyond the reuse of the buildings themselves. Preservation helps to reduce sprawl and the negative environmental impacts associated with it including loss of habitat, reliance on the automobile, dependence on fossil fuels, and the use of virgin land.
  • Investment in historic neighborhoods promotes efficient land use patterns that focus public and private infrastructure investments in established urban areas where substantial past investment has already been made. It is better to make use of existing infrastructure such as streets, schools, water and sewer lines, instead of leaving it underutilized. This saves the embodied energy of duplicating the infrastructure elsewhere. Historic neighborhoods also incorporate all the principles of Smart Growth, including density of development, mixed uses, and pedestrian scale.
  • Urban Forests Save Energy Trees lower local air temperatures by transpiring water and shading surfaces. Because they lower air temperatures, shade buildings in the summer, and block winter winds, they can reduce building energy use and cooling costs. USFS estimates the annual effect of well-positioned trees on energy use in conventional houses at savings  between 20-25% when compared to a house in a wide-open area. (USFS meteorologist Gordon Heisler). Projections suggest that 100 million additional mature trees in US cities (3 trees for every unshaded single family home) could save over $2 billion in energy costs per year. Help to cool cities by reducing heat sinks. Heat sinks are 6-19 degrees Fo warmer than their surroundings (Global Releaf GA). A tree can be a natural air conditioner. The evaporation from a single large tree can produce the cooling effect of 10 room size air conditioners operating 24 hours/day.
  • Windows are generally viewed as significant character defining features warranting preservation.
  • Steam Radiators Steam heating is one of the oldest heating technologies, but the process of boiling and condensing water is inherently less efficient than more modern systems, plus it typically suffers from significant lag times between the boiler turning on and the heat arriving in the radiators. As a result, steam systems make it difficult to implement control strategies such as a night setback system. Hot Water Radiators Hot-water radiators are one of the most common heat distribution systems in newer homes, second only to forced-air systems. They may be a baseboard-type radiator or may be of an upright design that resembles steam radiators.
  • Air Infiltration - Windows Updated historic windows can be just as efficient as new thermally resistant windows. Window retention: Preserves embodies energy. Reduces waste. Vinyl, fiberglass, sealants, etc all degrade and are not easily recycled. New windows have shorter expected life.
  • 9/9 FRI 2:45 | Green Great Neighborhoods

    1. 1. HISTORIC GREEN THE GREENEST BUILDING IS THE ONE ALREADY BUILT.
    2. 2. Riverside Avondale: A Great Neighborhood What Makes it Sustainable?
    3. 3. Stephen Tocknell, AICP Manager Tocknell Planning Services LLC Phone: 904-638 6629 Email: stevetock@clearwire.net INTRODUCTIONS
    4. 4. Corie Baker, AIA, LEED® AP Architect Pond & Company, Inc. Phone: 904-778-5952 Email: bakerc@pondco.com INTRODUCTIONS
    5. 5. Mary Tappouni, CGC, LEED® AP President Breaking Ground Contracting Phone: 904-388-1350 Email: mary@breakinggroundcontracting.com INTRODUCTIONS
    6. 6. Leslie Olson Assistant Planning Director City of Ft. Pierce Phone: 772 – 460 2200 x237 Email: lolson@city-ftpierce.com INTRODUCTIONS
    7. 7. <ul><ul><li>Began in 2007 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recognizes 30 Great Places Each Year </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>10 Great Public Places </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>10 Great Streets </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>10 Great Neighborhoods </li></ul></ul></ul>APA GREAT PLACES IN AMERICA
    8. 8. <ul><ul><li>What Makes a Place a Great Place? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Balances the Needs of Different Users </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Vibrant Places for Residents and Visitors </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Strong Sense of Place </li></ul></ul></ul>APA GREAT PLACES IN AMERICA
    9. 9. Florida Designees <ul><ul><li>Ocean Drive - Miami Beach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2007 Great Street </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>7th Avenue - Ybor City </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2008 Great Street </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plaza Real – Boca Raton </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2010 Great Public Place </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Riverside Avondale – Jacksonville </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2010 Great Neighborhood </li></ul></ul></ul>APA GREAT PLACES IN AMERICA
    10. 10. <ul><ul><li>First APA Great Neighborhood in FL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other 2010 Great Neighborhoods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>LoDo in Denver </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Back Bay in Boston </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Frank Lloyd Wright District in Illinois </li></ul></ul></ul>RIVERSIDE - AVONDALE
    11. 11. RIVERSIDE - AVONDALE
    12. 12. RIVERSIDE - AVONDALE
    13. 13. RIVERSIDE - AVONDALE
    14. 14. RIVERSIDE - AVONDALE
    15. 15. RIVERSIDE - AVONDALE
    16. 16. RIVERSIDE - AVONDALE
    17. 17. RIVERSIDE - AVONDALE
    18. 18. RIVERSIDE - AVONDALE
    19. 19. RIVERSIDE - AVONDALE
    20. 20. <ul><li>Established in 1974 to Fight </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inappropriate Zoning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Freeways </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Achievements </li></ul><ul><ul><li>National Historic District Designation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Historic Preservation Element in Comp Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Historic District Zoning Overlay </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Riverside Arts Market (RAM) </li></ul></ul>RIVERSIDE – AVONDALE PRESERVATION
    21. 21. RIVERSIDE – AVONDALE PRESERVATION
    22. 22. <ul><ul><li>Times Union – 2 stories + Editorial </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Metro Jacksonville </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>All Local TV Stations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Forbes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New Tang Dynasty (NTD) Television ! </li></ul></ul>RIVERSIDE – AVONDALE COVERAGE
    23. 23. Florida Times Union – 10-14-2010 <ul><ul><li>“ You can get to so much and do so much and enjoy your entire day just in this area. Between the shops and the parks and the weather – everybody’s out walking.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>– Amy Kaplan, 28 </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Florida Times Union – 10-14-2010 <ul><ul><li>“ You’ve got a lot of old people and young people that are hanging out in the same bars and cafés…Everybody kind of gets to know each other around here.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>– Chelsea Vandevender, 20 </li></ul></ul>
    25. 25. <ul><ul><li>Do They </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Promote or protect air and water quality? </li></ul><ul><li>Protect groundwater resources? </li></ul><ul><li>Respond to the threat of climate change ? </li></ul><ul><li>Protect or enhance local biodiversity or the local environment? </li></ul><ul><li>What forms of &quot;green infrastructure&quot; are used ? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(e.g., local tree cover mitigating heat gain) </li></ul></ul>ARE GREAT NEIGHBORHOODS SUSTAINABLE?
    26. 26. <ul><li>Long Term Grass Roots Involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Preserve – Don’t Destroy </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Range of Housing Options and Meeting Places </li></ul><ul><li>Orient Places to People Not to Cars </li></ul><ul><li>Jobs Housing Balance </li></ul><ul><li>Location Efficiency </li></ul>LESSONS FOR SUSTAINABILITY
    27. 27. Dense Network of Local Streets - Icing on the Cake!
    28. 28. American Planning Association (APA) Great Places in America For more information: http://www.planning.org/greatplaces/
    29. 29. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GREEN AND HISTORIC
    30. 30. WHAT MAKES HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOODS AND HISTORIC BUILDINGS GREEN?
    31. 31. <ul><li>Building a 50,000 sf commercial building requires the same amount of energy needed to drive a car 20,000 miles a year for 730 years. </li></ul><ul><li>The operation of buildings accounts for 43% of carbon emissions in the United States (Pew Center on Climate Change) </li></ul><ul><li>Construction of an average 2,000 sf home generates 3,000 pounds of wood waste , 2,000 pounds of drywall waste and 600 pounds of cardboard waste . </li></ul><ul><li>The construction of an average single family home generates four pounds of waste per square foot. </li></ul>The Numbers HISTORIC PRESERVATION & GREEN The Numbers HISTORIC PRESERVATION & GREEN
    32. 32. <ul><li>It is estimated that by 2030 we will have demolished and replaced nearly 1/3 of our current building stock (82 billion square feet). </li></ul><ul><li>It will take as much energy to demolish and replace 82 billion square feet as it would to power the entire state of California for 10 years. </li></ul><ul><li>Demolishing 82 billion square feet would create enough waste to fill 2,500 NFL stadiums. </li></ul><ul><li>To rehab even 10% of the 82 billion square feet would save enough energy to power the state of New York for a year. The Brookings Institution </li></ul>The Numbers HISTORIC PRESERVATION & GREEN The Numbers HISTORIC PRESERVATION & GREEN
    33. 33. <ul><li>We need to stop thinking of our buildings as disposable and start thinking of them as a renewable resource. </li></ul><ul><li>We already embrace recycling paper, aluminum and plastic, why not apply the same theory to our buildings? </li></ul>Historic Green HISTORIC PRESERVATION & GREEN
    34. 34. “ Historic preservation can – and should – be an important component of any effort to promote sustainable development. The conservation and improvement of our existing built resources, including re-use of historic and older buildings, greening the existing building stock, and reinvestment in older and historic communities, is crucial to combating climate change.” - National Trust for Historic Preservation HISTORIC GREEN
    35. 35. National Trust for Historic Preservation “ Any new building, no matter how much green technology it incorporates, represents a new impact on the environment. An older building represents a heavy prior investment of resources and energy. If you tear that building down, that investment is wasted-but if you keep the building in use, you’re saving energy and conserving resources. That’s what people mean when they call preservation the ultimate recycling.” -Vincent Scully Prize recipient and National Trust Past President, Richard Moe HISTORIC PRESERVATION & GREEN National Trust for Historic Preservation HISTORIC PRESERVATION & GREEN
    36. 36. WHY REUSE HISTORIC BUILDINGS? <ul><li>Reinvest in Historic Communities </li></ul><ul><li>The way our communities are laid out is just as important as the quality of our buildings. </li></ul><ul><li>Preservation reduces sprawl and allows for growth without the consumption of new land. </li></ul>
    37. 37. WHY REUSE HISTORIC BUILDINGS? <ul><li>Reinvest in Historic Communities </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes efficient land use patterns including mixed use, compact development. </li></ul><ul><li>Makes use of existing infrastructure. </li></ul>
    38. 38. WHY REUSE HISTORIC BUILDINGS? <ul><li>Reinvest in Historic Communities </li></ul><ul><li>Tend to be centrally located, dense, walkable and often mass transit accessible. </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces auto dependency. </li></ul>
    39. 39. <ul><li>Reinvest in Historic Communities </li></ul><ul><li>Orientation for sun exposure and summer breezes. </li></ul>WHY REUSE HISTORIC BUILDINGS?
    40. 40. <ul><li>Site Sensibility </li></ul><ul><li>Shaded porches, overhanging eaves and other features to reduce solar gain. </li></ul>WHY REUSE HISTORIC BUILDINGS?
    41. 41. <ul><li>Site Sensibility </li></ul><ul><li>Careful siting and landscaping as tools for maximizing sun exposure in the winter and minimizing it in the summer. </li></ul>WHY REUSE HISTORIC BUILDINGS?
    42. 42. <ul><li>Quality of Construction </li></ul><ul><li>Durability and Repairability </li></ul><ul><li>Long lasting, low maintenance materials </li></ul><ul><li>Craftsmanship </li></ul>WHY REUSE HISTORIC BUILDINGS?
    43. 43. <ul><li>Passive Heating and Cooling </li></ul><ul><li>Thick, solid walls, resulting in greater thermal mass </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces the amount of energy needed for heating and cooling </li></ul>WHY REUSE HISTORIC BUILDINGS?
    44. 44. <ul><li>Natural Light and Ventilation </li></ul><ul><li>Big, operable windows </li></ul><ul><li>Transoms </li></ul><ul><li>High ceilings </li></ul>WHY REUSE HISTORIC BUILDINGS?
    45. 45. Energy Loss in Average U.S Home (Source: Department of Energy) CHALLENGES OF HISTORIC BUILDINGS?
    46. 46. <ul><li>Air Infiltration </li></ul><ul><li>Windows </li></ul><ul><li>Roofs </li></ul>CHALLENGES OF HISTORIC BUILDINGS? <ul><li>Walls </li></ul><ul><li>Leaks </li></ul>
    47. 47. <ul><li>Toxic Substances </li></ul><ul><li>Asbestos </li></ul><ul><li>Mold </li></ul><ul><li>Lead </li></ul>CHALLENGES OF HISTORIC BUILDINGS?
    48. 48. <ul><li>Plumbing Fixtures </li></ul><ul><li>Toilets </li></ul><ul><li>Faucets </li></ul>CHALLENGES OF HISTORIC BUILDINGS?
    49. 49. <ul><li>Equipment </li></ul><ul><li>HVAC </li></ul><ul><li>Water Heater </li></ul>CHALLENGES OF HISTORIC BUILDINGS?
    50. 50. <ul><li>Windows </li></ul><ul><li>Seal all leaks </li></ul><ul><li>Consider storm windows </li></ul>HOW TO WE OVERCOME THE CHALLENGES?
    51. 51. <ul><li>Insulation </li></ul><ul><li>Roof </li></ul><ul><li>Floor </li></ul><ul><li>Walls </li></ul>HOW TO WE OVERCOME THE CHALLENGES?
    52. 52. <ul><li>Leaks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At windows </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In duct work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>At doorways </li></ul></ul>HOW TO WE OVERCOME THE CHALLENGES? <ul><ul><li>Roofs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Floors </li></ul></ul>
    53. 53. HOW TO RENOVATE A HISTORIC BUILDING SUSTAINABLY
    54. 54. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Products and Processes </li></ul>
    55. 55. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME A Case Study
    56. 56. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME A Case Study
    57. 57. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME A Case Study
    58. 58. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME A Case Study
    59. 59. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Additions </li></ul>
    60. 60. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME A Case Study
    61. 61. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Materials Re-Use and Durability </li></ul>
    62. 62. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Restore and Preserve </li></ul>
    63. 63. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Restore and Preserve </li></ul>
    64. 64. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Remove and Restore </li></ul><ul><li>Stains and Paints </li></ul>
    65. 65. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Remove and Restore </li></ul>
    66. 66. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Remove and Restore </li></ul>
    67. 67. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Remove and Restore </li></ul><ul><li>Inspiration </li></ul>
    68. 68. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Energy and Water Conservation/Efficiency </li></ul><ul><li>On-site re-use </li></ul>
    69. 69. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Energy Conservation </li></ul>
    70. 70. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction of new materials </li></ul>
    71. 71. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction of new materials </li></ul>
    72. 72. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction of new materials </li></ul>
    73. 73. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction of new materials </li></ul>
    74. 74. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Products and Processes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>caulks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>sealants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>adhesives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>thinset, grout </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>wood fillers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Paint/stain removal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New paints and stains </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>waste diversion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>epa (hazardous waste removal/disposal) </li></ul></ul>
    75. 75. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME <ul><li>A Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Historic LEED, Pursuing Platinum </li></ul>
    76. 76. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME A Case Study
    77. 77. RETROFITTING A HISTORIC HOME A Case Study
    78. 78. INNOVATION <ul><li>Vegetative Roofs </li></ul><ul><li>Combine with other strategies </li></ul>
    79. 79. INNOVATION <ul><li>Vegetative Roofs </li></ul><ul><li>Florida specific challenges </li></ul>
    80. 80. INNOVATION <ul><li>Solar </li></ul><ul><li>PV for Historic Homes </li></ul>
    81. 81. INNOVATION <ul><li>Wastewater Treatment </li></ul><ul><li>Living/Eco-Machines </li></ul>
    82. 82. INNOVATION <ul><li>Pervious Paving </li></ul><ul><li>Pavers and concrete </li></ul>
    83. 83. INNOVATION <ul><li>Vertical Green </li></ul><ul><li>Living walls and vertical gardens </li></ul>
    84. 84. INNOVATION <ul><li>Wind </li></ul><ul><li>Location matters </li></ul>
    85. 85. INNOVATION <ul><li>Rainwater Catchment </li></ul><ul><li>Rain barrels and tanks </li></ul>
    86. 86. INNOVATION <ul><li>Rainwater Catchment </li></ul><ul><li>Rain barrels and tanks </li></ul>
    87. 87. INNOVATION <ul><li>Greywater </li></ul><ul><li>Location matters </li></ul>
    88. 88. WHY HISTORIC PRESERVATION IS VITAL TO THE BIG PICTURE
    89. 105. QUESTIONS? Stephen Tocknell, AICP Manager Tocknell Planning Services LLC Phone: 904-638-6629 Email: stevetock@clearwire.net Corie Baker, AIA, LEED® AP Architect Pond and Company Phone: 904-778-5952 Email: bakerc@pondco.com Mary Tappouni, CGC, LEED® AP President Breaking Ground Contracting Phone: 904-388-1350 Email: mary@breakinggroundcontracting.com Leslie Olson Assistant Planning Director City of Ft. Pierce Phone: 904-460-2200x237 Email: lolson@city-ftpierce.com

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