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9/9 FRI 12:30 | Keynote: Ed T. McMahon
 

9/9 FRI 12:30 | Keynote: Ed T. McMahon

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Ed McMahon holds the Charles E. Fraser Chair on Sustainable Development at the Urban Land Institute in Washington, DC where he is nationally known as a thought provoking speaker and leading authority ...

Ed McMahon holds the Charles E. Fraser Chair on Sustainable Development at the Urban Land Institute in Washington, DC where he is nationally known as a thought provoking speaker and leading authority on topics related to sustainable development, land conservation, smart growth, and historic preservation. As the Senior Fellow for Sustainable Development, Mr. McMahon leads ULI’s worldwide efforts to conduct research and educational activities related to environmentally sensitive development policies and practices. He is the author or co-author of 15 books and over 200 articles, and has drafted numerous local land use plans and ordinances. His books include: Conservation Communities: Creating Value with Nature, Open Space and Agriculture; Developing Sustainable Planned Communities, Green Infrastructure: Connecting Landscape and
Communities, Land Conservation Finance, and Balancing Nature and Commerce in Gateway Communities. In his years of work he has organized successful efforts to acquire and protect urban parkland, wilderness areas, and other conservation properties, activities that have been at the heart of planning and conservation in Florida for decades.

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  • I was asked to speak about Sustainable Development and the role it can play in Florida’s development.
  • Green wash, Green marketing, A gimmick to make conventional projects look and sound better without fundamentally changing anything.
  • Tree green is about what is going on inside of buildings. It is the vertical dimension of sustainability. Since buildings use 40% of energy in US and consume 72% Of electricity, what goes on inside of buildings is of critical importance.
  • New buildings are an important but small part of the story. The most important buildings are existing buildings.
  • People ask: How will the recession effect green building?The anser is that it will slow, but not fundamentally change the market shift to green real estate.
  • What goes on outside of buildings is also of critical importance.
  • Where you build is as important as how you build. A conventional building at a transit stop in the middle of a downtown can be greener than a LEED Certified building in a far flung location. This is because of embodied energy and the energy used to commute to and from the building.
  • Full Spectrum Green addresses all three legs of the sustainability stool.
  • In ancient Athens, city leaders took an oath of office to leave that city, not less, but greater, more beautiful ands prosperous than it was left to them.
  • Sustainable communities are places of enduring value.
  • So what about planning in an age of de-regulation and hostility toward government?
  • The world is changing whether we like it or not. We can shape and direct that change or just let it happen.
  • Richard Florida – Author of The Creative Class has a new book about the recession and how it is reshaping America.
  • I would like to talk about one aspect of the change facing American communities. Specifically, I would like to talk abound the future of commercial development.
  • The old paradigm was large lot subdivisions and strip commercial development.
  • The era of strip development is coming to an end. Strip retail is retail for the last century. The future belongs to town centers, main streets and mixed use development.
  • Here is a summary of the reasons why the future belongs to town centers, main streets and mixed use development.
  • First of all, we are totally overbuilt on the strip.
  • If the recession has proved anything it is that we were overleveraged and over stored in America.
  • In 1960, if you had 200,000 sq. feet of retail, it was in a 4 story building on a downtown street. It had a footprint of about 1 acre.In 1980, if you had 200,000 sq. feet of retail, it was in a 1 story building on a commercial strip outside of town. It had a footprint of 12 to 20 acres.
  • Many commentators say that the biggest trend of the next generation will be the conversion of dead or dying strip malls.It is already happening in places like Denver, Los Angeles, and Washington, Dc
  • In 1970, Rockville, Maryland tore down its downtown and replaced it.
  • With a 200 store enclosed mall. 3 years ago, they tore the mall down and
  • Put the downtown back.
  • A majority of new housing in Los Angeles is being built on commercially zoned land.Montgomery County, Maryland has 123 strip malls with 4 to 40 acres of parking.
  • The old model.
  • The new model.
  • America’s 1st edge city is being transformed into a walkable urban place.
  • So are people. Especially the urbanized areas of ours cities.There is one place in America with more spending power than stores to spend it in –our cities.
  • Big box retailers say that the “final frontier” is in our downtowns.
  • This is what we used to call a department store.
  • Target’s flagship store and world headquarters is not out in the suburbs. It is in downtown Minneapolis.
  • 5 story Target in Stamford, CT
  • 5 story Wal-Mart in Washington, DC
  • Home Depot delivers in NYC
  • In Vancouver you can sleep upstairs and shop downstairs
  • With Borders, it really didn’t make a difference
  • But with most stores, it does
  • It is ugly and congested. Try running a successful marketing campaign around this slogan.
  • How many people do you know who go to strip centos to hangout?
  • Transportation costs are offsetting lower home prices in the exurbs.
  • The economy is reshaping retail.
  • E-Commerce means fewer and smaller stores.
  • The new economuy is happening in older neighborhoods, like the Design District in Miami.
  • Younger crowd wants to be at the center of things. Like all generations they do not want what their parents wanted.
  • The place is more important than the product.
  • Sprawl vs. compact development
  • Mall
  • To Mixed use town center
  • A Florida example
  • There are several keys to overcoming opposition to density.
  • Design is more important than the number of units per acre.
  • Density does not demand high rises.
  • Georgetown, Alexandria, Brooklyn Heights, Oak Park, IL, Mountain Brook, AL
  • Florida examples. Tradirtional market analysis would have said that tere was no market for housing in downtown West Palm Beach.
  • We are at the beginning of a new era in America. It will reshape our lives and our communities in ways no less fundamental than the industrial revolution. Communities that prepare for and plan for the future will proper those that cling to the old ways will falter.
  • Big changes are ahead. These changes will be akin to changes that occurred 100 years ago.
  • Exhibit at the Smithsonian Museum of American History in Washington, DC

9/9 FRI 12:30 | Keynote: Ed T. McMahon 9/9 FRI 12:30 | Keynote: Ed T. McMahon Presentation Transcript