APA-NJ ECDC | 4Thought Forum Presentation | "Planning for Immigrant and Multi-Ethnic Communities"

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On Friday, June 22, 2012 - the APA-NJ Ethnic and Cultural Diversity Committee (ECDC) hosted a forum entitled “Planning for Immigrant and Multi-Ethnic Communities.” This forum focused on teaching key concepts, trends and issues associated with immigration and their planning implications.

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  • MELISSA
  • MELISSA
  • MELISSA 7 miles from City Hall in Philadelphia’s Olney Neighborhood 13 blocks Total: 1.4 miles Spencer to rail: 0.75 mile Rail to Roosevelt: 0.6 mile
  • MINDY Interface Studio, a city planning and urban design firm founded in 2004 and based here in Philadelphia Interface works at a range of scales from policy work at the citywide level (including industrial strategies for Philadelphia and Detroit and housing strategies for Rochester NY) to community planning at the neighborhood scale, which is really our sweet spot
  • MINDY Interface’s plans have received three recent American Planning Association National Excellence Awards: Two for Grassroots Initiatives - Philadelphia’s Lower Italian Market & Yorktown Neighborhoods The other for Public Outreach along six commercial corridors in Chicago Just a couple more words about what makes Interface different, what sets us apart – highlighted by recent APA awards We believe that the practice of urban planning is evolving, becoming increasingly graphic, grassroots-driven, and interactive, and we strive to be accessible to all audiences with a style that is approachable, artistic, playful, and intended to welcome the public into the process as true collaborators. Also emphasize urban incrementalism, which is really grounded in a bottom-up approach to planning with extensive, creative public outreach that works to build capacity and community – and start the ball rolling toward implementation before the plan has even been finished.
  • MINDY/STACEY
  • MINDY
  • MELISSA – WHOLE SECTION Background: key trends, concepts and issues, ways to think about planning for immigrant and diverse communities Why this topic interests me
  • Migration flows
  • 1920 – 1965 - lull in immigration Early 1960s – 250,000 authorized immigrants per year
  • 1965 - Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 = 4 th Wave of Immigration, mostly from Latin America and Asia
  • 1970s – waves of refugees from SE Asia, Eastern Europe and Africa settled 1970s – 500,000 authorized per year
  • 2000 – one million authorized per year
  • - Between 1860 and 1920, immigrants as a percentage of the total population fluctuated between 13 and 15 percent, mainly due to European immigration. - Decline between 1920s and 1970s, reaching a record low of approximately 5 percent in 1970 (9.6 million individuals). - Since 1970, steady rise, mainly due to large-scale immigration from Latin America and Asia. 1980 - 6 percent (14.1 million); 1990, 8 percent (19.8 million); 2000 - 11 percent (31.1 million); 2010 - 13 percent (40 million) - 2010 – NJ had the highest proportion of foreign-born in their total population. 21% are foreign-born. - Today’s immigrants are mostly from non western nations – 53% from Latin Am, 28% Asia, 12 Europe, 4 Africa more economically diverse than previous working class immigrants. As many as 700,00 per year are undocumented. - Immigrants have made the population more racially, ethnically and culturally diverse than ever before.
  • RACE + ETHNICITY 1970 – Asians 1; Hispanics 5. 2010- 1/3 are minority; Asians 5; 16. 2050 – nearly ½ minority, Asians 8; Hispanics 30. A few years ago, planners did not have to think about ethnic, racial and cultural diversity so much. Now, cannot be ignored. How can we plan with difference in mind? Zoom in on specific issues: HRC inclusionary task force, language access, etc.; diversity is something to manage. Wider lens, beyond just as a tack on or afterthought solutions. Diversity is an opportunity/advantage – merits and limits of dominant theories and practices.
  • How do we do this? Lay out some concepts and issues to think about immigrants and diverse people when planning. Immigration is a dynamic 2-way process - immigrant geographies
  • Types of responses Currently, about process, not content
  • ‘ Culture’ cannot be understood as static, eternally given, essentialist. It is always evolving, dynamic and hybrid of necessity. All cultures, even allegedly conservative or traditional ones, contain multiple differences within themselves that are continually being re-negotiated. - Leoni Sandercock, 2004
  • PHILIP Overview of Philadelphia’s Olney neighborhood & 5th Street business district A “intercultural approach to planning and community development Challenges/Issues & Community Needs Why N5SRP hired Interface
  • So, getting back to Olney…
  • Through 1970, Census only asked White/Black/Other 1980, they added Asian, American Indian
  • Of the 19% of the population that is foreign born, 55% are from Asia (predominately Cambodia and Korea), 39% are from Latin America (predominately Caribbean nations), and 5% are from Africa (predominately Sub-Saharan nations).
  • About 50% of constituents do not speak English at home or as their primary language.
  • Bit about target area…
  • PHILIP
  • MELISSA/PHILIP Challenges & Issues For an Intercultural Approach to Planning and Community Development…
  • Before we start? It’s half-time – quick stretch break?
  • You’ve heard a lot about Olney, so we’ll start the case studies with our outreach approach there… Community outreach process was conceived as a range of “conversations” – where we meet community where it is rather than making community members come to us… guerilla-style tactics.
  • … out of five that we employed for the plan. Talk about piggybacking on other community meetings to reach various segments of the community on this slide… regularly scheduled community meetings health fairs, festivals Interviews, Big Idea and Pop Up Event illustrated on following slides
  • Conducted a range of INTERVIEWS with residents, community leaders – but most importantly, with business owners… Always busy, hard to get out to meetings… But an crucial segment of the population, as the plan was for the commercial corridor, but also because the merchants on 5 th Street are a diverse group – long term Philadelphia businesses, but also many businesses owned by immigrant families and catering to ethnic communities. So – we went to them, on the corridor, during business hours… Had a translator when necessary, and we learned a lot about why they choose to do business here, and for many the diversity and ethnic enclaves were part of the story.
  • Philip and Melissa were an incredible help, not only in getting the word out about the plan, but in helping to gather input early on at a range of community events – the health fair, a festival on 5 th Street, etc. We like to use a tool we call a Photo suggestion booth where we invite people write down their one big idea for improving the community – in their language of choice. Then we take their photo (they can wear a mask or disguise if they want to remain anonymous) – and we upload the photos to flicrk, facebook, etc. It’s fun, fast, and non-trheatening – a mini-survey that people of all ages and language abilities can engage with. The graphic nature attracts people’s attention as they pass by, and if literacy is an issue, we always offer to do the writing ourselves.
  • A snap shot of the input we received with the big idea board – the basics: Clean & Safe, but also youth activities & opportunities for unity & engagement… a desire for more community events.
  • So we responded to that desire for more community events with our biggest public outreach effort of the project – a two-day pop up sidewalk event called WHAT IF… ON NORTH 5 TH And this gets to the idea of micro publics that Philip spoke about… Set up shop and met people on 5 th Street – on two of the coldest days of the year! With hot cocoa and questions – to start a conversation about change and encourage people to sign up for more information and volunteer opportunities.
  • Quick recap of What If?... On North 5 th Advertised in the Spanish newspaper Had a range of interactive activities… stations for people to engage in, and once they had offered input at all of the stations, they got a free tote bag.
  • Pictures of the tote bags, the Santa Trolley where kids could take their photo with Santa and write on the Wish List for North 5 th Street. At the sign in, we invited people to share their contact info and indicate whether they would be interested in volunteering or receiving updates from N5SRP.
  • One of the activities that we had people do was help us determine their priorities by spending limited resources – very limited – on budget items that matter most to them… Remarkable consistency with the input we received from the speech bubbles – safe, clean, community, which was reassuring – even though we were having impromptu conversations with different sets of people, clear themes were emerging.
  • So, to sum up the advantages and disadvantages of these On The Street tools - PLUS Wide exposure, convenient for community Fun, not traditional Casual, not intimidating, back and forth in language of choice – fortunate to have good language coverage MINUS Significant effort and resources – time, money, energy – to produce an event like this – much more intensive than meeting with ppt May have had a dispersed effect by piggybacking on other events – rather than big, organized meeting that announces the plan – but again, a meeting like that would only reach a particular segment of the community.
  • We were hired by the city to lead a visioning process with a very high level of citizen engagement to help them identify the key goals for the city to focus on. At the center of the vision plan process was citizens talking to each other about the future of Suwanee in 2020. this was achieved through multiple engagement methods with different levels of commitment and intensity for the participants. Observations and ideas were collected through each method and hashed out by 255 citizens who participated in a series of 4 small-group discussions
  • About 30 miles from Atlanta Most of the growth happened after 1990
  • Population spike after 1990 Asian and Hispanic growtn between 2000-2010
  • Duluth – right next to Suwanee - is the center of the Atlanta-area Korean community but the distinction between the two is fluid. Citywide about 18%
  • According to Kevin Kim, Atlanta Radio Korea host and festival coordinator, the event, the largest Korean gathering in the Southeast, serves as a bridge between the local community and Korean Americans. "The main purpose for this festival is to bridge the gap between Koreans and Americans," he said. "This will be a good chance to let non-Korean people learn about our culture." “ All the major players in the Korean community in Atlanta or in Georgia are all involved in this event." 2012 is fourth year of festival in Suwanee
  • Open to the public in a vacant storefront for 5 weeks in summer 2011 with interactive exercises to reveal citizen concerns and ideas for the future.
  • x
  • Plus: People could drop in when it was convenient for them. A way to interact with other citizens and City staff in a casual, fun environment. Publicized the plan in a very visible way. Minus: limited by the level of publicity – some did not hear of it, limited to one location which although central in the City may not be frequented by every sector of society, a “you come to us” approach though more flexible and convenient
  • Different relationships to Suwanee – many identify with and visit the City b/c it hosts the Korean Festival and is home to a growing number of Korean businesses; for residents it is the same as everyone else: family-friendly, good schools, good amenities (parks, library); next to Duluth – the center of the Korean community where there has been push back there with concerns about the changing population (ex. signs in Korean) – Suwanee is perceived as more welcoming PLUS: focused and specific conversation in more intimate and comfortable setting MINUS: separate from the larger group/process, need to ensure that focus group members are integrated into the larger group
  • From 10/28/2011 http://www.newsnpost.com/data/read.php?id=news1&page=1&sn1=&divpage=1&sn=on&ss=on&sc=on&keyword=Suwanee&select_arrange=headnum&desc=asc&no=1821 Some of lessons learned made their way into the plan recommendations: be inclusive, include ethnic media in all press releases/events to get the word out early and effectively, engage ethnic community leaders at decision-making level through commission/board membership, use community liaison to develop relationships and smooth over any potential issues, “Welcoming” is front and center in the Vision Statement as a core value of the City.
  • OPEN HOUSE Plus: People could drop in when it was convenient for them. A way to interact with other citizens and City staff in a casual, fun environment. Publicized the plan in a very visible way. Minus: limited by the level of publicity – some did not hear of it, limited to one location which although central in the City may not be frequented by every sector of society, a “you come to us” approach though more flexible and convenient WEBSITE Plus: convenient re: time and place Minus: no face time with neighbors, not accessible to everyone
  • FOCUS GROUP PLUS: focused and specific conversation in more comfortable setting MINUS: separate from the larger group/process, need to ensure that focus group members are integrated into the larger group MEDIA OUTLETS PLUS: effective way to spread the word to target audience MINUS: extra effort to coordinate translation/interpretation & include ethnic media alongside mainstream media
  • Lastly – and quickly – we figured we should talk about traditional public meetings Still an important way to communicate about planning, and many clients and constituent groups expect them But we’ve had varied experiences with this format, especially in multi-lingual communities – share two different styles, beginning with a project in Camden, NJ where we used consecutive translation in our meetings… probably the most basic tool (with serious drawbacks) for planning in an immigrant or multi-ethnic community…
  • Working in Cramer Hill, in Camden, just across the river from Philly… Can see in the slide, that we did some simple Spanish subtitles in our presentations…
  • Highest concentration of foreign-born residents and 60% of neighbors in Cramer Hill speak Spanish at home – way higher than the citywide rate.
  • Did some things well from an outreach perspective… got out the word – on highly visible billboards, gave the planning effort a real brand and advocacy slogan, really mobilized neighbors to take action NOW - got people to roll up their sleeves and get working… built the first community garden in the neighborhood while the plan was still being completed.
  • But as far as “ you come to us” versus “we go to you” Format is not conducive to language/communication needs
  • One last case study…
  • A bit of context… Working in a portion of Eastern North Philadelphia… where ¼ of the land is vacant or abandoned, development pressure has been building – from the south (Northern Liberties), east (Fishtown), and northwest (Temple University), and housing prices have been rising dramatically in turn – up from a median sale price of $40,000 or less in 2002 to as much as $250,000 in some parts of the neighborhood in 2008.
  • ABOUT LANGUAGE – few people can visualize the size of an acre of land… or 1800 parcels or pieces of land. But everyone knows how big a football field is. When we translated the acreage of vacant land into football fields, we gave people a tool for how to speak about this issue in their community. Story of how image took off like wildfire… feel free to interject, here Jill.
  • ABOUT GRAPHIC LANGUAGE – blue shows location and scale of market-rate residential development; yellow shows size and scale of affordable residential development… And when we showed this slide at a public meeting, people gasped. The map confirmed what they new intuitively… that the market-rate housing and luxury condos were far out-pacing the affordable housing being built in the area… and that the market was encroaching into their neighborhood… it’s one thing to say number of units, another to show the impact of the market forces at work.
  • Norris Square simultaneous translation
  • Advocacy postcards in Spanish – empowered constituency
  • Grassroots organizing is part of WCRP’s mission and they do it well - they put the power in the hands of the people through: 1) WCRP subcommittees very hands on involvement of community groups invited to participate at an intensive level 2) Personal and relatable narratives: We paired personal stories about the impact of vacancy and shifting market dynamics with the data and research in the Land Use Plan
  • Your experience with these tools? Other successful tools to share?
  • And with that we’ll say thanks, and please feel free to be in touch if you have additional questions.
  • APA-NJ ECDC | 4Thought Forum Presentation | "Planning for Immigrant and Multi-Ethnic Communities"

    1. 1. PLA NNING FORsnazzy cover:Started in illustrator IMMIG RA NT A ND MULTI-E THNIC C OMMUNITIE SNorth 5th Street Revitalization ProjectMelissa Kim, DirectorPhilip Green, VISTA VolunteerInterface Studio LLCStacey Chen, AICP, AssociateMindy Watts, AICP, PP, Senior AssociateAPA-NJ Ethnic &Cultural DiversityCommittee (ECDC)4 Thought ForumFriday, June 22, 2012
    2. 2. 7 M ILE S F R O M C ITY H ALL:IN P H ILAD E LP H IA’S O LN E Y N E IG H BO R H O O D
    3. 3. 3 APA National Planning Excellence Awards 2009 for a G ras s roots Initiative Lowe r Italian M arke t R e vitalization P roj ct, e P h ilad e lp h ia 201 0 for P u b lic O u tre ach Wicke r P ark Bu cktown M as te r P lan, C h icago 201 2 for G ras s roots Initiative Yorktown 201 5: A Blu e p rint for S u rvival & + S u s tainab ility, P h ilad e lp h ia • G rap h ic and p layfu l natu re of ou r work • Inte re s t in “u rb an incre m e ntalis m ”
    4. 4. YO U R TU R N Your first name and Your organization, affiliation or interest in this topic
    5. 5. BAC K G R O U N D :KE YTR E N D S• O VE R VIE W O F M IG R ATIO N F LO WS AN D TH E IR IM P AC T
    6. 6. "Foreign born" and "immigrants" are used interchangeably and refer to persons with no U.S. citizenship at birth. This includes naturalized citizens, lawful permanent residents, refugees and asylees, persons on certain temporary visas, and undocumented migrants. – U.S. CensusBE TWE E N 1 880 AN D 1 920, TH E IN D U S TR IAL R E VO LU TIO NF U E LE D IM M IG R ATIO N TO TH E U .S .M O S T IM M IG R AN TS C AM E F R O M E U R O P E
    7. 7. BE TWE E N 1 920 AN D 1 965, TH E R E WAS A LU LL INBUM IG RTH E E AR LY 60s , TH E U .S . AU TH O R IZE D 250,000IM T IN ATIO N …IM M IG R AN TS P E R YE AR
    8. 8. TH E IM M IG R ATIO N & N ATIO N ALITY AC T O F 1 965S P U R R E D TH E 4TH WAVE O F IM M IG R ATIO NM O S T C AM E F R O M LATIN AM E R IC A AN D AS IA
    9. 9. IN TH E 1 970s , WAVE S O F R E F U G E E S F R O M S E AS IA,E AS TE R N E U R O P E & AF R IC A S E TTLE DALS O IN TH E 70s , TH E U .S . AU TH O R IZE D 500,000
    10. 10. IN 2000, TH E U .S . AU TH O R IZE D 1 ,000,000 IM M IG R AN TSP E R YE AR
    11. 11. IM M IG R AN TS H AVE M AD E TH EPO P U LATIO N M O R E R AC IALLY, E TH N IC ALLY & C U LTU R ALLY D IVE R S E TH AN E VE R BE F O R E
    12. 12. BAC K G R O U N D :C O N C E P TSAN DIS S U E S• TH E O R IE S O F P LAN N IN G F O R M U LTI-E TH N ICC O M M U N ITIE S
    13. 13. Questions or comments about thetrends or concepts? Any thing we missed?
    14. 14. A C LIE N T’S P E R S P E C TIVE :P LAN N IN GFO R AM U LTI-E TH N IC• O VE R VIE W O F P H ILAD E LP H IA’S O LN E Y N E IG H BO R H O O D &5 TH S TR E E T BU S IN E S S D IS TR IC TC O M M U N IT
    15. 15. M U C H O F P H ILAD E LP H IA R E M AIN S Q U ITES E G R E G ATE DTH E O LN E Y N E IG H BO R H O O D IS AN
    16. 16. S O U TH E R N G ATE WAY TO O LN E Y
    17. 17. N O R TH 5 TH S TR E E T
    18. 18. R E S ID E N C E S IN O LN E Y
    19. 19. AN O R G AN IZE R ’S P E R S P E C TIVE :P LAN N IN GFO R AM U LTI-E TH N IC• P U BLIC E N G AG E M E N T TAC TIC S & TO O LS• TH E R O LE O F M IC R O P U BLIC SC O M M U N IT
    20. 20. [AN D YO U C AN N E VE R G O
    21. 21. Do these issues and needsresonate with you? Any issues we missed?
    22. 22. A P LAN N E R ’S P E R S P E C TIVE :TO O LSFO RP LAN N IN GFO R AM U LTI-• IN F O R M AL C O N VE R S ATIO N S & IN D IVID U AL IN TE R VIE WS –5 TH S TR E E T IN O LN E Y• F O C U S G R O U P S & M E D IA O U TLE TS – S U WAN E E , G A
    23. 23. C AS E S TU D Y: N O R TH 5 TH S TR E E T IN O LN E YP H ILAD ETO O LS :• IN TE R VIE WSLP H IA• M O BILE BIG ID E A S U R VE Y• P O P -U P S ID E WALK E VE N T
    24. 24. Promote 5 th Street as an international restaurant zone The density in the area is helpful.” We moved here for a better P H O TO S 5 th Street is unique – the specialty foods Korean community for our kids draw people from far awayO N E -O N -O N E C O N VE R S ATIO N S
    25. 25. M O BILE S U R VE YS
    26. 26. A TWO -D AY P O P U P S ID E WALK E VE N T
    27. 27. 100PA T NT R ICIPA S
    28. 28. C AS E S TU D Y:S U WANTO O LS :• O PE N H O U S EEE, GA• WE BS ITE• FO C U S G R O U PS• M E D IA O U TLE TS
    29. 29. REGIONAL : URBANIZED 1990-2000
    30. 30. AGE POP RACEHOUSING
    31. 31. IN 2000, MAN YKO R E AN AN DVIE TN AM E S EF AM ILIE SWE R ES E TTLIN GJU S T S O U THO F S U WAN E E
    32. 32. TO D AY TH E R EAR E MO R EAN D M O R EAS IANF AM ILIE S INAN D AR O U N DS U WAN E E
    33. 33. AN D TH E IR P R E S E N C E ISAD D IN G A U N IQ U EF E ATU R E TO TH E C ITY’S
    34. 34. AN D C U LTU R AL C H AR AC TE R
    35. 35. WE BS ITE
    36. 36. M E D IA O U TLE TS
    37. 37. C AS E S TU D Y:C AM D ETO O LS :• TR AD ITIO N AL P U BLIC M E E TIN G – C O N S E C U TIVEN, NJTR AN S LATIO N
    38. 38. E R HILL NE IG HB ORHOOD PLA N P LAN D E L BAR R IO D E C R AM E R H ILL
    39. 39. Cramer Hill Neighborhood Plan Cramer Hill CDC Plan del Barrio de Cramer Hill 60% O F H O U S E H O LD S S P O K E S P AN IS H
    40. 40. C AS E S TU D Y: E AS TE R N N O R THP H ILAD ETO O LS :• TR AD ITIO N AL P U BLIC M E E TIN G – S IM U LTAN E O U SLP H IATR AN S LATIO N• G R AS S R O O TS O R G AN IZIN G
    41. 41. S U M M AR Y:LE S S O N SLE AR N E D• TAKE TH E TIM E TO P LAN AN D IM P LE M E N T O U TR E AC HS TR ATE G Y F R O M TH E S TAR T• U S E G R AP H IC AN D N O N -VE R BAL C O M M U N IC ATIO N• D E VE LO P M U LTI-F AC E TE D AP P R O AC H , C O M BIN E “YO UC O M E TO U S ” WITH “WE G O TO YO U ”• C R E ATE C O M F O R TABLE F O R U M S F O R E N G AG E M E N T• WO R K WITH TR U S TE D O R G AN IZATIO N S AN D BU ILD TR U S TTH R O U G H TH E P R O C E S S• BE IN C LU S IVE AN D IN VO LVE M AN Y P E O P LE
    42. 42. UPDATE QUESTION – 10 min What is your experience with these tools? Are there other tools you use that you would like to share?
    43. 43. FUPDATE QUESTION –P !min O LLO W U 10 M E LIS S A K IM : M K IM @ N O R TH F IF TH .O R G P H ILIP G R E E N : P G R E E N @ N O R TH F IF TH .O R G S TAC E Y C H E N : S TAC E Y@ IN TE R F AC E - S TU D IO .C O M M IN D Y WATTS : M IN D Y@ IN TE R F AC E - S TU D IO .C O M TH AN K S !

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