SNEAPA 2013 Friday f4 10_30_what's my tod combined sneapa presentation

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What's my TOD? Frameworks to Identify the Potential for Transit-Oriented Development

What's my TOD? Frameworks to Identify the Potential for Transit-Oriented Development

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  • 42 station areas
  • Hand out chart
  • Most suburbandevelopmetns require at least 2 spaces per unit- $100,000 of structured parking. Methods for reduciung- shared, transit, car-share, unbundled parking, etc.Parking ratios of 2-3 spaces per unit can doom TOD construction

Transcript

  • 1. What’s My TOD? Evaluative Frameworks to Identify the Potential for Transit-Oriented Development Massachusetts Area Planning Council Capitol Region Council of Governments Regional Plan Association 1
  • 2. Transit Station Area Mix and Intensity 1,000 Metro Core Seaport / Airport Neighborhood Subway (Employment + Population) Per Developed Acre Normalized Intensity (log scale) 100 T ransformational Subway T rolley Suburb Urban Gateway T own & Village 10 Commerce Park Suburban T ransformation Undeveloped 1 - 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 Mix (employment/(employment + population)) Source: MassGIS InfoGroup, MAPC Analysis , Data are for 1/ 2 mile non-exclusive station areas
  • 3. TOD in the Pipeline and Additional Potential 140,000 Additional potential for 16 million sq ft. 120,000 100,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 - Potential for add'l 43,400 units 32,700 units in the pipeline Housing Units 35 million sq. ft in the development pipeline E mployment
  • 4. • • • • •
  • 5. • • • • • • • •
  • 6. Knowledge Corridor TOD Market Analysis • Analyzes existing market conditions • Projects future jobs and housing • Identifies TOD opportunities and strategies • Helps us think about TOD on corridor basis
  • 7. Sustainable Knowledge Corridor • Home to 1.6 million residents • 3 planning regions in MA and CT • Over $1.5 billion in new transit and rail investment • Shared regional assets
  • 8. Sustainable Knowledge Corridor Projects • Regional Planning & Civic Engagement – Update existing regional plans – Develop Bi-State Action Plan • Special Projects: Leadership Pioneer Valley, TOD Market Analysis, Transit Enhancement Studies, Sustainable Land Use and Affordable Housing Regulation Development, Training • Place-Based Projects: Springfield, Chicopee, Holyoke, Hartford, New Britain and Enfield • Metrics and Information Sharing www.sustainableknowledgecorridor.org
  • 9. Demographics are Promising for TOD
  • 10. Need Corridor Centered Growth
  • 11. TOD Supportive Industries Are In Corridor and Are Growing
  • 12. TOD Needs More than Transit— Market and Urban Form Matter Opportunities & Strategies Vary by Station Type
  • 13. Realizing TOD Requires Proactive Efforts • • • • • • Planning and Visioning Zoning and Land Use Regulations New Development Neighborhood Revitalization Local Transportation and Infrastructure Economic Development
  • 14. Active Leadership is Crucial for Success • Investments by States and Anchor Institutions can be catalysts for development in station areas
  • 15. For More Information Contact Mary Ellen Kowalewski Director of Policy and Planning Capitol Region Council of Governments 860-522-2217 ext. 222 mkowalewski@crcog.org www.crcog.org
  • 16. Amanda Kennedy Connecticut Director Regional Plan Association amanda@rpa.org www.rpa.org 23
  • 17. Transit-Oriented Development in Connecticut • Transit Expansions: • New stations opened: West Haven, Fairfield • Potential new stations: Orange, Bridgeport, Stamford • Branch line improvements under consideration: • New Canaan • Danbury • Waterbury • Transit-oriented economic development strategy: • Governor’s Inter-Agency Task Force • TOD Pilot Program • Sustainable Communities Grantees: • New York- Connecticut Sustainable Communities Consortium • Knowledge Corridor Consortium 24
  • 18. One Region Funders GroupEquitable TOD • Partnership of Funders and Non-profits • TOD Toolkit • Analysis of community readiness • Do land use regulations in Connecticut support transit-oriented development? • Are there common regulatory barriers? 25
  • 19. Does your town support TOD? • Plan of Conservation and Development • What does your Plan of Conservation and Development say about your station area? • How old is the plan? How well does it reflect community values? • Zoning • What would as-of-right development look like in your station area? • How could a change to regulations encourage investment? • Next Steps 26
  • 20. Findings Yes Partly No Vision Is there a community vision in place that recognizes the potential of transit to impact development? 23 8 11 Land Use 22 Do a mix of land uses meet the needs of residents and businesses? 10 10 12 9 Density 21 Do densities support frequent transit and create local consumer demand? Parking Do parking ratios & other strategies encourage transit use and reduce the amount of land and dollars invested in parking? 8 Yes 19 Partly 15 No 27
  • 21. 28
  • 22. Vision: Define relationships of transit & land use to each other • More than ½ of stations are center of TOD-type community visions • Other stations recognize need for additional planning POCD does not address station area, 11 Transitbased vision in place, 23 Suggests further planning, 8 • Eleven stations ignore potential of TOD around stations 29
  • 23. 30
  • 24. Land Use: Maximize ridership & activity with mix of uses • Most stations with visions in place have zones which allow a mix of uses • Others have multiple zones near station, contributing to overall neighborhood mix Residential only, 11 Mixed-use zoning in place, 22 Area allows multiple uses, 9 31
  • 25. Density: Encourage proximity of uses & economic feasibility • Assess different densities for different places • Suburbs: • >10 units/acre, 3 stories, 1.5 FAR • Cities: • >20 units/acre, 4 stories, 2.5 FAR • There’s no magic number • “Moderate” density may be insufficient for development feasibility Low, 9 Transitoriented density, 19 Moderate density, 11 32
  • 26. Parking: Minimize need for cars and investment in parking • Towns are beginning to make use of strategies to reduce parking, such as • Shared across time of day • Payment-in-lieu supporting public parking Reduced parking ratios, 7 Cardependent ratios, 16 Strategies allow reduced parking, 19 33
  • 27. 34
  • 28. Community ProfileDarien • POCD: supports “parkonce” commercial district “[Darien] should continue to have higher density housing located near transportation facilities such as train stations, and within walking distance to local shopping.” • Zoning: 2-story commercial, parking, singlefamily homes • Parking: 2-2.5 spaces per unit, potential reductions for shared 35
  • 29. Community ProfileBethel • Vision: Rezone station area for moderate density mixeduse, complete sidewalk network “Landscaped sidewalks connecting the mixed use development with the train station and downtown should include benches, water fountains, and other pedestrian amenities.”- Bethel POCD • Zoning: mixed-use up to 10 units/acre, more possible w/village district overlay • Parking: standard, with shared & TOD reductions possible 36
  • 30. Community ProfileBridgeport • POCD: pedestrian-friendly and transit-oriented “The competitive edge for a Downtown is the ability to create a pedestrian environment where people walk instead of drive from one place to another.” • Zoning: Downtown village, up to 20 stories • Parking: Low minimums of 0.5/unit + 10% with ability to reduce further with shared parking, carsharing, unbundled, employe e cash-outs… 37
  • 31. Urban Reposition Station • • • • • • • Land Use Mix Single-family and multifamily residential Neighborhood retail Industrial Industrial building conversions to res./comm. Parks Median Residential Sales Price/Rent $73,600/$842 (corridor median $160,869/$930) Density 20.94 persons/acre Walkability High Transit Services Local bus service Est. 954 daily CTfastrak Boardings (2015) Neighborhood Municipal Development Plan Supports TOD Brownfields remediation needed to support development % TOD Supportive Jobs 59%
  • 32. New suburban train station • • • • • • • • Land Use Mix Single-Family Residential Strip Commercial Industrial Median Residential Sales Price $206,750 (2009) Density 5,212/sq mile (townwide) ~9 people/acre Walkability Low Transit Services Bus every 20-30 minutes Commuter rail every 20-40 minutes Plan of Conservation & Development Extensive TOD plan includes identifying needs and establishing agency responsibilities Zoning TOD zone: Med/High density mixed-use. Residential uses contingent on commercial component. Surrounding zones allow lower-density mixeduse/multifamily. Parking 1 space per bedroom 2 minimum per unit except in TOD district 39