SNEAPA 2013 Friday f1 10_30_after the storm
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Learning from St. Bernard Parish. After the Storm: The Planner's Role for the Next One

Learning from St. Bernard Parish. After the Storm: The Planner's Role for the Next One

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  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />
  • Genesis and initial thinking. Jeannine asked when change was occurring at OCC – what is OCC&apos;s strategic plan? That started the thought process and through leadership and intervention, we gathered in January for our first meeting for strategic planning session and then went to Chicago. From there it has taken on new meaning, direction, and relevance to OCC throughout the organization. <br />

SNEAPA 2013 Friday f1 10_30_after the storm SNEAPA 2013 Friday f1 10_30_after the storm Presentation Transcript

  • Learning from St. Bernard Parish SNEAPA - After the Storm: The Planner’s Role for the Next One Donald J. Poland, AICP Don Poland Consulting www.donaldpoland.com
  • After the Storm: St. Bernard Parish Outside the Levee Wall
  • After the Storm: St. Bernard Parish
  • After the Storm: St. Bernard Parish
  • After the Storm: St. Bernard Parish
  • After the Storm: St. Bernard Parish
  • After the Storm: St. Bernard Parish
  • After the Storm: St. Bernard Parish
  • After the Storm: St. Bernard Parish
  • After the Storm: St. Bernard Parish
  • After the Storm: St. Bernard Parish What we Plan for - Risk Management and Emergency Planning •We calculate and try to measure risk and exposure to risk: • Hazard x Exposure x Vulnerability = Risk •We plan for emergency response: • Preparedness and Evacuation • First Response • Search and Rescue and Recovery •We provide government aid and support in the aftermath for: • • • • Loss Clean-up Planning Redevelopment •We DON’T plan for • • • • After the disaster – What to do and how to do it? How to redevelop – What areas should or should not be rebuilt? Capacity and management – How do we manage recovery? We don’t plan for the everyday – How do we manage the everydayness of recovery?
  • After the Storm: St. Bernard Parish
  • After the Storm: St. Bernard Parish The Challenge of Planning for Recovery •How do you tell people they can’t rebuild? •How do you plan and do what is ‘right’ when there is an overwhelming rush to normalcy • We must, we will rebuild!!! •How do you manage government when every record, document, survey, map, and permit has been destroyed? •What do you do when the community has infrastructure to support a population of 65,000 and you are now 35,000? •How do you navigate and manage the red tap, strings, and conditions of Federal and State aid? •When is recovery complete? How do we measure for our return to normalcy?
  • After the Storm: St. Bernard Parish Lessons I Have Learned •Rush to normalcy out weighs rational thought and long term planning. •The ‘little and simple things’ of everyday government is magnified and intensified— doing your job can become challenging? •We need to plan for ‘after the disaster.’ • What are our threats and what are the potential impacts of those threats? • How might those threats impact us— change our future? [Flood zones, Hurricanes, Tornados, etc.] • What systems (policies, procedures, protocols) do we need to have in place to manage the outcomes of those threats? • What are possible alternative futures and how do we plan for these futures?
  • Southern New England American Planning Association After the Storm: The Planner’s Role for the Next One Thank You! Don Poland Consulting www.donaldpoland.com
  • It’s Not Just About Temperature: Stormwater Management in a Changing Climate Michael Dietz, Ph.D. CT NEMO University of Connecticut SNEAPA Conference Panel 10/18/13
  • Precipitation Regime Changing o Research shows higher annual totals, and more highintensity events in the Northeast Rhode Island-Spring 2010
  • Annual precipitation in CT Source: Miller, et al. 2003. Precipitation in Connecticut. Report No. 38. Institute of Water Resources, University of Connecticut.
  • Sediment plume from Irene
  • Storm Frequency Analysis 100 year flood? 500 year storm? oProbability of occurrence of a given precipitation event • Based on magnitude and duration of a rainfall event e.g., “the 100-year, 24 hour storm is 8.1 inches”
  • Question
  • Uses of storm frequency values o Engineering design of culverts, storm drainage • TP-40 values (1961)
  • Effects of Using Outdated TP40 Values o Due to changes in precipitation intensity and frequency, older return period estimates are inaccurate • This can lead to undersized stormwater infrastructure o Researchers at Cornell have updated these values http://precip.eas.cornell.edu/
  • Storrs, CT Precip. Values (24 hr) RI TP-40 (in) Updated values (in) 1 2.5 2.67 5 4.0 3.95 10 4.5 4.66 25 5.5 5.79 50 6.0 6.84 100 7.0 8.07
  • What Can You Do Now? o Keep track of problem areas o Digitize if possible o Make sure that new infrastructure is sized properly o Use Low Impact Development where possible
  • LID tools Bioretention/rain gardens Permeable pavements Vegetated roofs
  • THANKS! Michael.dietz@uconn.edu
  • After the Storm: THE PLANNER’S ROLE FOR THE NEXT ONE POST-DISASTER PLANNING IN MILFORD, CT Emmeline Harrigan, AICP, CFM Assistant City Planner Floodplain Manager Milford, CT
  • Year-Round Flooding Potential: Fall Hurricanes Winter Nor’easters Spring Storms/Up stream Melt Summer Thunderstorms & Flash Floods New Haven
  • MILFORD FLOOD FACTS 4,000 Flood zone properties 2,943 flood insurance policies in Milford $2,935,266 premiums $631,836,200 insurance in force 2,596 claims paid since 1978 $62,151,650 in closed paid losses 510 Repetitive Loss Properties 42 Severe Repetitive Loss Properties
  • Storm Irene – August 28, 2011 540+ Structures Damaged 50 Substantially Damaged $23M in insurance claims
  • Storm Sandy – October 29, 2012 1,000 Structures Damaged – from basement heating systems to full structural collapse 200+ Substantially Damaged Total $$ damages still unknown
  • Long Term Recovery From July 2012 to October 2013: •New construction: 26 •IRENE repair (elevate): 2 •SANDY new: 3 •SANDY repair (elevate): 26 •Residential alteration (elevate): 1 Summary: New construction is 29; Elevate is 29 Only 25% of substantially damaged structures
  • Step 1: Hazard Mitigation Planning •Required if Community applies for any Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funds •Every 5 years •Milford’s “Update” increased from 30 pages to 144 pages with 100 pages of Appendices •Extensive new FEMA guidelines for vulnerability assessments and potential property loss analysis •Start early – approx. 2.5 years including public outreach and state and FEMA Region I review time • HIRE A CONSULTANT!
  • Vulnerability and Repetitive Loss Identify Areas and Neighborhoods Identify if Public Infrastructure Projects Play a Role
  • Step 2: Be Prepared to Target Funding Elevations (some reconstruction allowed):     Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (FEMA) Severe Repetitive Loss (FEMA) Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary of Interior/Historic Preservation Funds Acquisitions (with an established local policy):    Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (FEMA) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) Public Mitigation Projects (culverts, drainage, etc.)   Hazard Mitigation Grants (FEMA) US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)
  • Coastal Resiliency – Planning for the Future Re-investment, Retreat or a Combination?
  • Re-investment : Elevate & Reconstruct Facts: Size: 480 SF Appraised Value: $155-160 K Elevation Cost: $65-70 K Site Grade: 3.5 Tax Revenue: $2,800 New FFE: 12+
  • Milford Point/Cedar Beach
  • New Neighborhoods/Different Quality of Life  Demographic shifts due to increased costs  Urban aesthetic – no more quaint beach cottages  Increased height= limited access/ability to age in place  Check height limits with local FD.
  • Focused Retreat/Open Space Purchases      “Houses in the Swamp” Beneficial Natural Function/More Flood Storage Protecting Tidal Marshlands and Habitat Lessen Infrastructure Expansion Burden Prevent Future Jurisdiction/Ownership Issues
  • SEA LEVEL RISE
  • Planning a Combined or Phased Approach Understand Long Term Municipal Costs Understand Political Dynamic Engage discussion about open space and ecology protection Hire a Third party facilitator
  • SNEAPA - After the Storm: The Planner’s Role for the Next One Design of Shoreline Protection and Waterfront Structures Azure Dee Sleicher, P.E. Ocean and Coastal Consultants, Inc. Trumbull, CT www.ocean-coastal.com 45 October 2013
  • Discussion Topics: Design criteria and best practices for waterfront structures Role of regulatory agencies in facilitating best practices 46 October 2013
  • Residential Property Greenwich, CT After Sandy • New home sufficiently elevated per FEMA FIRM map – sustained little to no damage. • Scour and undermining of concrete seawall • Timber pier destroyed 47 October 2013
  • Residential Property Greenwich, CT Apparent seawall structure deficiencies: • Lack of footing • No drainage allowances • No steel reinforcement 48 October 2013
  • Residential Property Greenwich, CT Apparent pier structure deficiencies: • Overall lack of initial design criteria • Deck elevation too low • All timber elements • Undersized hardware • Piles not embedded deep enough 49 October 2013
  • Residential Property Greenwich, CT Seawall design improvements: •Design for "100-year" storm wave loads •Foundation below expected depth of scour or pinned to rock •Incorporated weep holes and crushed stone behind wall for drainage 50 October 2013
  • Residential Property Greenwich, CT 51 October 2013
  • Residential Property Greenwich, CT Pier design improvements •Design for "100-year" storm wave loads & uplift •Increased top of deck elevation •Steel piles and framing •Grated decking to reduce wave pressures 52 October 2013
  • Residential Property Greenwich, CT 53 October 2013
  • Yacht Club Property Darien, CT After Irene 54 October 2013
  • Yacht Club Property Darien, CT After Reconstruction 55 October 2013
  • Yacht Club Property Darien, CT After Sandy 56 October 2013
  • Beach Club Property Rye, NY After Sandy 57 October 2013
  • Beach Club Property Rye, NY 58 October 2013
  • Beach Club Property Rye, NY 59 October 2013
  • Role of Regulatory Agencies for Future Storm Resiliency • General Permits and Emergency Authorizations • In-kind/in-place replacement of damaged shoreline protection structures • Minimal/no reporting or after-the-fact permitting • Allowed owners to quickly rebuild BUT… 60 October 2013
  • Role of Regulatory Agencies for Future Storm Resiliency Was this the best idea? •No engineering/future design criteria required •No increase in seawall height/protection allowed Will these structures just fail again during the next Sandy event? 61 October 2013
  • Role of Regulatory Agencies for Future Storm Resiliency Take away message… •We need to urge regulators to require waterfront structures to be designed by professionals to meet engineering and material standards as well as account for sea level rise and effects of climate change. •There is a lot of guidance available for development of wave criteria, loads and design of waterfront structures but very few agencies require certification as part of the permitting process. 62 October 2013