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  • APA’s new Strategic Plan for 2012-2013 draws on these three terms, Lead, Inspire, Innovate, to guide the future development of our association and profession.
  • Goal 1 is carried out through our new communications strategy, our advocacy and partnership efforts, awards program, and public information efforts including Great Places in America and National Community Planning Month, which we celebrate each October.
  • College Hill, Providence, Rhode IslandCollege Hill brings the past into the present. Its history reaches back to 1636 as the site of Rhode Island's first permanent Colonial settlement. Cobblestoned Benefit Street, known as the Mile of History, is lined with 18th, 19th, and 20th century municipal structures, churches, and gracious homes. Two educational institutions — Brown University and the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) — have contributed to the neighborhood's vitality and character together with residents and organizations, including the Providence Preservation Society (PPS).
  • 2011 Great Streets: Market Street and Market Square, Portsmouth, New HampshireA public lottery held in 1762 paid for paving the Market Square in Portsmouth. In the 250 years since, the square and three streets originating from it — Market Street, Pleasant Street, and Congress Street — have remained the hub of downtown commerce and community life year-round. Portsmouth today is a vibrant regional destination for the arts, dining, and heritage tourism, but the city's economy hasn't always been so robust. Faced with declining industry during the 1950s and '60s, the city cleared portions of the downtown through urban renewal. Beginning in the 1970s, creative developers began rehabilitating historic industrial buildings on Market Street for conversion to residential and retail uses.
  • Nantucket's Main Street is one of those American streets that defines the place it is located. Round, uneven cobblestones pavers bring an immediate sense of history and intimacy to Main Street whether a visitor is traveling by foot, bicycle, or car. Church spires, tree-shaded Greek Revival mansions, and the town's waterfront frame the views up and down the street. More than two dozen sidewalk benches, located next to the "Hub" and the local drug store, invite residents and visitors alike to sit and visit, watch the comings and goings of downtown Nantucket — or kids going sledding after a winter snowstorm.
  • 2011 Great Streets: Downtown Woodstock Streetscape, Woodstock, VermontDowntown Woodstock's four principal streets — Central, Elm, North Park, and South Park — bring together scenic mountain skylines, early 19th century New England architecture, the center of community life, and 250 years of history. Elm Street has some of the oldest properties and most stately homes in Woodstock including the Dana House, F.H. Gillingham & Sons general store, and First Congregational Church, all of which were built during the early 19th century. Lying between North and South Park streets is The Green, Woodstock's community front yard, the location of a weekly farmers market during summer and fall, and the site of several more of the town's most impressive houses.
  • Our community assistance program, our focus on social equity in all our publications, and our focus on all three “E”s of sustainability through our Sustaining Places Initiative. The final report of the Sustaining Places task force, on best practices in including sustainability in the comprehensive plan, will be out this fall.The Community Assistance Program is active at the national and chapter level. APA Illinois, APA Washington, Minnesota, New Jersey, and other chapters are engaged in active program to assist communities to help build their capacity for good planning to ensure successful outcomes.
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rn0dfABOFj0
  • Crestdale is a community in transition. Situated in the town of Matthews, outside of Charlotte, the neighborhood has a rich history dating back to the 1870s as a settlement for freed slaves and their families. Over the years residents have relied on the strong leadership of local churches and community groups, but as the town experiences shifting racial, cultural, generational, and income demographics, Crestdale has lost its collective voice.New economic opportunities are arising in and around Matthews; plans for a regional Sportsplex and the completion of the Southeast Transit Corridor present challenges to maintaining the neighborhood's unique character and affordability. A variety of plans have been drawn up to take advantage of these developments, while incorporating long-held desires for elderly housing, a central community meeting space, convenience store and eco-friendly residential development.  However, achieving community-wide support for any one option has become a serious challenge.The Community Planning Assistance Team will play an important role in fostering dialogues that allow residents to voice their hopes and concerns for the future of Crestdale. Balancing this input with their professional evaluations of community plans already on the table, the Team will help stakeholders determine what types of development will best serve residents' needs. The ultimate goal will be to work towards a comprehensive vision plan for development in Crestdale, including an implementation strategy that cultivates community participation and support.Jason Beske, AICP, a planner and urban designer with 10 years of experience in urban and suburban redevelopment, will lead the CPAT team, composed of three to four planning professionals with expertise in land use and economic planning, public participation and coalition-building in diverse communities, and project implementation. 
  • Story County, Iowa is a community looking to strategically align economic development and quality of life. Located just north of the state capital of Des Moines, the county has a long history that dates back to the arrival of first railroads to the area in the late 19th century.More recently, the county has faced increasing pressure from development interests seeking to expand. This has caused some friction between these interests and some long-term residents who wish to keep much of the land outside the county's 15 towns and cities exclusively agricultural. As the county seeks to develop and expand its economic base, it must draft a plan that will address both sides of this critical issue.Development pressure is especially strong along the Lincoln Highway corridor between the City of Ames and the county seat of Nevada. A number of plans have been drawn up to take advantage of this economic opportunity for the county. These plans expand opportunities for development in the county while also incorporating long-held desires to preserve agriculture and promote natural resources and open space. However, achieving community-wide support for any one option has become a serious challenge.The Community Planning Assistance Team will play an important role in fostering dialogues that allow residents and key stakeholders to voice their hopes and concerns for the future of Story County.Balancing this input with their professional evaluations of community plans already on the table, team members will help stakeholders determine what types of development will best serve residents' needs. The ultimate goal will be to work towards a comprehensive vision plan for development in Story County, including an implementation strategy that cultivates community participation and support.Wayne Feiden, FAICP, a planner with much experience with technical assistance teams across the country, will lead a CPAT team that includes three additional planning professionals with expertise in land use and economic planning, public participation and coalition-building in diverse communities, and project implementation.
  • Another goal is to engage with thought leaders in the field, and make sure that wise and seasoned planners pass along their knowledge to the next generation of students and new professionals.
  • The Student/New Professional/and early career program, leading to AICP certification, will get an overhaul in the coming years, as we work to become the indispensible organization for early career professionals.
  • APA is very active in the social media world, and we recognize the importance of member interaction and engagement online, with their colleagues and other professionals.
  • The fifth and final goal of the development plan is about “One APA”. We are one organization, with many parts and components. We believe that our influence, to bring elected officials and community leaders into positions of support for good planning, is strongest when we speak with one voice.
  • APA’s new Strategic Plan for 2012-2013 draws on these three terms, Lead, Inspire, Innovate, to guide the future development of our association and profession.

Transcript

  • 1. LeadInspireInnovate
  • 2. 21st Century Challenges &Emerging TrendsGraying and browning of Changing politicalAmerica landscapeRise of the single person Antiquated zoning codeshouseholds Shrinking tax base for localTraditional family is governmentschanging Availability of waterAging infrastructure Obesity and public healthUrban sprawl, aging Jobs and the economysuburbs/retrofitting suburbs GlobalizationClimate change
  • 3. 1. We are guardians of the future!2. We protect the public interest.3. We shall have special concern for the long-term consequences of present actions. (AICP Code of Ethics)4. Planners have a purpose. Our communities need us!5. If you add value you must show that show yourself valuable.
  • 4. The Strategic PlanAPA’s Development PlanImplementation
  • 5. Goal 1 – Innovation, creativityand problem solving; advocatefor the value of planning.
  • 6. 2011 Great Neighborhood:College Hill, Providence, RhodeIsland
  • 7. 2011 Great Streets: Market Street andMarket Square, Portsmouth, NewHampshire
  • 8. 2011 Great Streets: Main Street,Nantucket, Massachusetts
  • 9. 2011 Great Streets:Downtown WoodstockStreetscape, Woodstock,Vermont
  • 10. Goal 2 – Lead America’scommunities toward amore just andsustainable future.
  • 11. CAP Workshop – NoMa,Washington, DC
  • 12. CPAT– Crestdale Neighborhood,Matthews, NC
  • 13. CPAT: Story County, IowaCPAT Dates: October 23-27, 2011
  • 14. Goal 3 – Cultivate and inspire the nextgeneration of planning leaders, ensure thegrowth of planning knowledge.
  • 15. Goal 3 – Cultivateand inspire thenext generation ofplanning leaders,ensure the growthof planningknowledge.
  • 16. Goal 4 – Enhance the excitementand enthusiasm for planning bydeveloping new strategies toattract a broader audience.
  • 17. Goal 5 – OneAPA: We areoneorganizationwith onemission. Wesucceed byworkingtogether.
  • 18. LeadInspireInnovate