The Dell PowerEdge C5125                     ™                                                                        ™ Mi...
Return to top                                  to hosted service providers for more capacity at a volume discount. With sh...
Return to top                                  Density                                  PowerEdge™ C5125 microservers sign...
Return to top                                                     Memory latency is reduced by an Integrated Memory Contro...
Return to top                                               Comparison of Microserver and IU Server Energy Use            ...
Return to top                                  Overhead is also reduced by vastly simplified network cabling. All servers ...
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The Dell™ PowerEdge™ C5125 Microserver: Right-sized for Maximum Return on Investment

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Profitable hosting companies have an opportunity to increase revenues and decrease costs by
deploying right-sized technology. Where overprovisioning positions hosters for future business
and ensures that capacity will meet service-level agreements, the practice risks profits by raising
costs. In contrast, right-sized technology maximizes revenue generation across servers, racks,
and every square foot of data center space. Dell PowerEdge C5125 microservers with AMD
Athlon™ II and Phenom™ II processors allow hosters to realize the most revenue from the least
space. Innovations in hardware infrastructure and processor capabilities combine to significantly increase
density, performance, energy and maintenance efficiency to deliver true business advantage.

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The Dell™ PowerEdge™ C5125 Microserver: Right-sized for Maximum Return on Investment

  1. 1. The Dell PowerEdge C5125 ™ ™ Microserver: Right-sized for Maximum Return on Investment Contents Abstract. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Hosting Opportunities and Challenges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Right-sizing the Data Center with Dell PowerEdge C5125 Microservers . . . . . . . . . 2 Ensuring ROI with Dell Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Brought to you compliments of: Abstract Profitable hosting companies have an opportunity to increase revenues and decrease costs by deploying right-sized technology. Where overprovisioning positions hosters for future business and ensures that capacity will meet service-level agreements, the practice risks profits by raising costs. In contrast, right-sized technology maximizes revenue generation across servers, racks, and every square foot of data center space. Dell PowerEdge C5125 microservers with AMD Athlon™ II and Phenom™ II processors allow hosters to realize the most revenue from the least space. Innovations in hardware infrastructure and processor capabilities combine to significantly in- crease density, performance, energy and maintenance efficiency to deliver true business advantage. Hosting Opportunities and Challenges Hosted service providers have a golden opportunity to build their client bases. However, they are challenged to deliver more online services and provide better access to applications without increasing IT spending. As a result, budget-minded IT directors and their budgets are turning©2012 Dell and Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.
  2. 2. Return to top to hosted service providers for more capacity at a volume discount. With shared infrastructure and resources already in place, hosted service providers can provide almost-instant access to the required technology, while providing cost-effective pricing and service levels to their customers. A hosted service provider’s ability to maintain profitability while shifting quickly to meet customer demands depends directly on deploying the right technology. Performance, availability, and agility are all essential characteristics of a profitable server infrastructure that is based on a service-level agreement (SLA) deliverable. Clients expect hosters to meet the delivery speeds, downtime limits, and response time criteria specified in their SLAs. Technical problems that cause missed SLAs can create costly customer service issues, and negatively impact revenue and customer retention. Hosters often overprovision in an attempt to ensure SLA compliancy. That practice might offer a safety net, but it definitely wastes resources and cuts into profit margins. Hosting websites, streaming video, or lightweight applications don’t require intensive data processing or the overprovisioned computing horsepower, advanced memory options, large storage capacities, and management tools typically found in data center servers. Hosters that right-size servers for the workloads they support can increase their revenue potential and profitability. Recognizing the impact of technology on profitability, some members of the investment community rate a hosted service provider’s financial performance on revenue per square foot of data center floor space. From that perspective, a right-sized server infrastructure — one that allows IT directors to meet client needs, limits operational costs, and increases revenues — can be an important component of the hosted service provider business strategy. Right-sizing the Data Center with Dell™ PowerEdge™ C5125 Microservers Dell’s PowerEdge C5125 microservers with AMD Phenom™ II and Athlon™ II series processors are purpose-built for hosted service providers that deliver web content and run lighter weight applications. Developed at the request of hosted service providers seeking to increase revenue potential without adding significant costs, they offer profitable innovations in density, perfor- mance, energy efficiency, and cost-effective maintenance and management at both the server and rack level. The Dell PowerEdge C5125 contains up to 12 single-socket server nodes inside a single 3U chassis. Server nodes share highly efficient power supplies and fans. Density is significantly increased, while power consumption costs are reduced.2 ©2012 Dell and Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.
  3. 3. Return to top Density PowerEdge™ C5125 microservers significantly maximize rack and data center revenue potential. Four to 12 server nodes are packed into a single PowerEdge C5000 3U chassis. At the maximum number of nodes, PowerEdge C5125 servers offer four times the number of traditional single- socket 1U servers. As a result of the density alone, hosters get more compute power per server, per rack, and per square foot of data center space. It’s at the rack level that Dell™ PowerEdge C5125 microservers distinguish themselves as right- sized revenue generators. Consider how the 3U architecture compares with a traditional 1U server architecture in terms of its ability to serve more clients from the same amount of 42U or 48U rack space. 42U rack comparison 48U rack comparison Number of C5125 servers — 144 Number of C5125 servers — 168 Number of DL160 servers — 40 Number of DL160 servers — 46 The difference in servers per rack translates directly to a significant increase in revenue potential. The calculations and C5125 revenue advantage below are based on a per-server revenue estimate of $1,098 per month (based on pricing for Rackspace Managed Dedicated Enhanced Servers). C5125 HP DL160 C5125 advantage Per-server revenue $1,098 $1,098 Revenue per month/rack $184,464 $50,508 + $133,956 Revenue per year/rack $2,213,568 $606,096 + 1,607,472 It’s important to note that increased server density also saves on data center space. For some hosters, that might mean that smaller data centers with lower real estate and utility costs will help increase profit margins. More typically, hosters will be able to remain in one data center facility for more time even as their client base grows. Performance Reliable performance is a central concern of hosting clients. Failure to meet requirements as out- lined in SLAs risks the hoster’s revenue and reputation. At the same time, profitability demands that the cost of SLA compliance is kept to a minimum. Performance per PowerEdge C5125 server is enhanced through AMD Phenom™ II and Athlon™ II series processors and included feature sets. Besides boosting processing speeds, the processors enhance connection speeds, reduce latency, and optimize bandwidth to eliminate management overhead and manual IT processes. The processors improve performance further by using direct connections between the processor, the memory controller, and the I/O to the CPU. Direct connections reduce the bottlenecks that form when multiple components vie for processor access. By eliminating the single front-side bus that typically carries memory access, graphics, and I/O traffic, delays caused by competing components are also eliminated.3 ©2012 Dell and Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.
  4. 4. Return to top Memory latency is reduced by an Integrated Memory Controller that automatically scales mem- ory bandwidth and performance to current requirements. Included HyperTransport™ Technology makes maximum use of bandwidth by providing up to 16GB per peak bandwidth per processor, effectively reducing I/O bottlenecks and up to 37GB in total processor-to-system bandwidth. Energy Efficiency Not only do the PowerEdge C5125 servers ensure the right performance levels, but they also minimize power and cooling costs through innovative infrastructure and features included in AMD Phenom™ and Athlon™ processors. In fact, the PowerEdge C5125 has the lowest average power draw and a lower active idle power than similarly configured HP ProLiant or SuperMicro servers.1 The shared PowerEdge C5000 3U chassis infrastructure allows server nodes to share power supplies and fans and consume a fraction of the cooling required by a comparable stack of 1U servers.2 Power supplies, tested to be 92% efficient, further reduce power consumption over traditional servers.3 Idle power improvements include low core voltages and enhanced cache power management. And PowerEdge C5125 microservers use only one-sixth of the number of fans required by traditional servers. Only eight shared, high-efficiency fans are used to cool all 12 servers in the chassis. That compares with the 48 fans that would be needed to cool the equivalent traditional 1U servers. At the rack level, data center technicians realize the advantage of power supplies, cables, and servers all being cold-aisle accessible. Data center temperatures can be higher, which further reduces cooling requirements and costs. With 12 servers in 3U, cooling can be reduced by 75% when compared with the cooling required by racks of 1U servers. Additional power consumption reductions are realized through AMD processor technology. AMD PowerNow!™ Technology automatically optimizes power consumption in accordance with current processing requirements. Processors respond to changes in client workload demands to minimize latency but conserve energy. AMD CoolCore™ Technology automatically turns parts of the processor on and off as needed, while Smart Fetch Technology allows cores to share data before entering a halting state so that cores don’t have to activate just to retrieve data. AMD’s power-saving technology lowers consumption for basic tasks by 50%.4 Power required by heavy workloads is decreased by 40%, and idle servers consume 40% less power.5 (It’s important to remember that even idle resources consume power — another reason to deploy only as much technology as is required by current client workloads.)1 Benchmark results based on SPECpower_ssj2008 performance testing by Dell Labs in June 2011. Actual performance will vary based on configuration, usage, and manufacturing variability. SPEC and the benchmark name SPECpower_ssj are trademarks of the Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation. For the latest SPECpower_ssj2008 benchmark results, visit http://www.spec.org/power_ssj2008/results/power_ssj2008.html. Dell pricing taken from dell.com as of September 2011; HP pricing based on reseller quotes obtained June 2011.2 Shared Infrastructure: Scale-Out Advantages and Effects on TCO, Dell™ Technical White Paper, http://www.dell.com/downloads/global/products/pedge/en/Shared_ Infrastructure_Scale_Out_Advantages_and_Effects_on_TCO.pdf3 Highly efficient microserver in a shared-infrastructure chassis, http://www.dell.com/us/business/p/poweredge-c5125/pd?refid=poweredge-c5125&isredir=true4 AMD Athlon™ II Processor Product Brief, http://www.amd.com/us/products/desktop/processors/athlon-ii-x2/Pages/amd-athlon-ii-x2-dual-core-processors- product-brief.aspx5 AMD Athlon™ II Processor Product Brief, http://www.amd.com/us/products/desktop/processors/athlon-ii-x2/Pages/amd-athlon-ii-x2-dual-core-processors- product-brief.aspx4 ©2012 Dell and Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.
  5. 5. Return to top Comparison of Microserver and IU Server Energy Use Cooling Power Mechanicals               12U               th 1/6  the  40% less power  4x the density amount of fans per node   Dell PowerEdge C5125 3U microservers provide 4x more capacity and require one-sixth of the number of fans and 40% less power than traditional 1U servers. Taken together, power efficiencies at the rack level translate to 40% reduction in OpEx and $35,502 cost savings over a three-year period when compared with traditional 1U server racks. Applying a $1.05/year/watt charge to running a server 24/7 and a Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) factor of 1.7, 168 PowerEdge C5125 servers in a rack cost $20,290 to power and cool versus $32,124 per year for the same number of HP DL160 1U servers. Cost-Effective Maintenance and Expansion Besides lowering costs through power efficiency, PowerEdge C5125 microservers streamline expansion and maintenance to lower IT overhead. Depending on the number of current clients, hosting providers might begin with four servers inside a single 3U chassis and then simply add servers as clients are added. (Server sleds simply slide into a slot in the chassis.) This precludes investment in capacity that won’t immediately contribute revenue. Some service providers opt to add one or two more servers than are immediately necessary in order to have spares available without having to allocate space to back up servers. Ensuring availability is critical to customer satisfaction and typically a major contributor to maintenance operations. Making sure that servers are up and running takes time and manual effort. PowerEdge™ C5125 servers include hot-swappable, redundant power supplies to eliminate maintenance emergencies. Should the primary power supply fail, the redundant power supply automatically steps up. Technicians are able to replace failed components without taking the server off-line. The result: Server operations and connected end users are not interrupted by power supply issues.5 ©2012 Dell and Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.
  6. 6. Return to top Overhead is also reduced by vastly simplified network cabling. All servers inside a PowerEdge C5000 3U chassis are able to share a single network connector. Although it is possible to cable each server, connecting to the network via a single port that communicates with all servers reduces 11x when compared with a traditional server environment. Fewer ports mean less management, and connection problems are much easier to diagnose. And when new servers are added to the chassis, cabling is already in place. Cold-aisle accessibility, redundant power supplies, and reduced cabling all simplify servicing. The ability to add, remove, or swap servers while others in the chassis are up and running enables hosted service providers to work with a single client’s resources without impacting other clients. Ensuring ROI with Dell™ Services Achieving returns on investment in a time frame that will truly benefit the bottom line requires deployment that is both fast and successful. Dell consultants and technicians can help reduce time to revenue with Rack Integration services. Data center components — server clusters, storage devices, network equipment — are configured and cabled by Dell, either on-site or before they are packaged and shipped. When systems arrive in the data center, they are simply powered on, tested, and integrated into the existing environment. Since technology is often at the heart of the hosted service provider business strategy, achieving high returns from investments requires routine optimization. Dell ProSupport™ allows data center managers to customize a support plan that delivers services required by the business. Services might include remote monitoring and management; remote and on-site support for specialized applications; data and asset protection; or online “self-dispatch” of parts and labor. Support can also be comprehensive, including configuration, deployment, patches, updates, and upgrades, collaborative to include third-party vendors, or extended to incident-based third-party trouble- shooting software. Training and certification for IT staff is available and allows for the ability to self-identify the severity of issues to initiate mission-critical response. Through service relationships with Dell consultants and technicians, hosted service providers can get just the level of service they need to help keep their IT environments optimized and continually maximize revenue potential while controlling costs. Conclusion Hosted service providers are well positioned to take advantage of increasing market demands for high-performance web, print, content, and file services. However, failure to deliver those services from a right-sized server environment will reduce both revenue potential and profitability. In order to maintain and grow profit margins, hosters have to perform to client service-level agreements and build client bases without significantly increasing overhead costs associated with space, power, and cooling requirements. Dell™ PowerEdge™ C5125 microservers with AMD Athlon™ II and Phenom™ II processors have proven their ability to contribute to the revenue potential of each server, rack, and square footage of floor space, while reducing power and cooling requirements and facilitating maintenance and expansion.6 ©2012 Dell and Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.

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