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Realising UNESCO’s vision of lifelong learning

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Conferencia presentada por Madhu Singh …

Conferencia presentada por Madhu Singh

Congreso Aprendizaje permanente: un desafío y una oportunidad para la educación superior 5 y 6 de noviembre 2013 – Universidad Católica de Temuco

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  • 1. Realising UNESCO’s vision of lifelong learning Dra. Madhu Singh Unesco Institute for Lifelong Learning (UIL) in Hamburg, Germany Congreso Internacional ALFA TRALL Apprendizaje permanent: un desafio y una oportunidad para la educación superior 5 y 6 noviembre 2013 – Universidad Católica de Temuco Chile
  • 2. Structure 1. UIL’s approach to sharing learning across countries; 2. Conceptual framework of lifelong learning; 3. UIL’s policy framework for strengthening lifelong learning; 4. Lessons learned; 5. Challenges.
  • 3. 1. “Policy dialogue” and “bench-learning”  International benchmarking of a few areas of strategic importance;  Common policy framework or criteria;  Using insights from country-specific contexts;  Countries learning from each other.
  • 4. 1. Using empirical evidence to obtain insights on how countries are realising lifelong learning Linking Recognition Practices to National Qualifications Frameworks – International exchange of experiences and strategies (UIL, 2013); 23 country examples Why Recognition matters: Global perspectives on recognition, validation and accreditation of non-formal and informal learning (UIL, 2013); 24 country examples
  • 5. 1. Using empirical evidence and insights on how countries are realising lifelong learning  Global Inventory of National Qualifications Frameworks (UIL, 2013); 34 cases  Observatory on Recognition, Validation and Accreditation of Non-formal and Informal Learning; 60 cases  UNESCO Guidelines for the Recognition, Validation and Accreditation of the Outcomes of Non-formal and Informal learning (UIL, 2012).
  • 6. Global trends: Li 2. Shaping UNESCO’s Vision of lifelong learning  The report Learning to Be commissioned by UNESCO in 1972 (Faure et al., 1972). Embodies fundamental alternatives to the prevailing concepts and structures of education.  The UNESCO’s Delors Report, Learning: The treasure within (Delors et al., 1996). A clear shift emerged from the term ‘lifelong education’ to ‘lifelong learning’, putting the emphasis on learner needs and individual choice.
  • 7. 2. “Lifelong education” and “lifelong learning”  Lifelong education implies a greater emphasis on learning within formal educational institutions (programmes of adults through distance learning etc.)  Lifelong learning, encompasses all forms of learning.  Lifelong learning pays emphasis to strengthening the foundation for effective learning through the life span.  Lifelong learning entails developing the skills, knowledge and motivation among young people and adults to enable them to be self-directed learners.
  • 8. 2. Lifelong learning is an organising principle, an integrative concept Lifelong learning has become an organising principle of sector-wide education and training reforms; It entails the notion of human capabilities and the social dimensions of learning; It is an integrated approach to personal, social and economic development; It entails the ability to work across different sectors and policy domains; .
  • 9. 2. Lifelong learning is an organising principle, an integrative concept It entails the ability to work across different sectors and policy domains; A significant goal of lifelong learning and education should be the development of active citizenship, humanistic values and democratic ideals; The concepts of formal, non-formal and informal learning have become key terms within the lifelong learning approach.
  • 10. 2. Implementation of lifelong learning from a multi-level perspective Macro-level : NQFs can be seen as a response to a more integrated and inter-linked system of learning pathways; Micro-level: closer action between workplace, individual and education providers; assessment, validation and accreditation practices; personal development and career planning; tailor-made learning; portfolio development; teaching and learning strategies;
  • 11. 3. UIL’s policy framework for strengthening lifelong learning  Improving progression pathways;  Strengthening foundations of lifelong learning;  The use of NQFs and learning outcomes-based reference points;  Including other areas of human capabilities beyond productive skills;
  • 12. 3. UIL’s policy framework for strengthening lifelong learning    Delivery of assessment, validation and accreditation of formal, non-formal and informal learning as a core quality issue; Clarifying roles of stakeholders in enhancing lifelong learning; The reorientation of education and training systems and policies towards a diversified and integrated lifelong learning system.
  • 13. 4. Lessons learned  NQFs can accelerate developments in lifelong learning  NQFs facilitate interfaces between education in formal institutions, non-formal education and learning, and skills development.  The principles of inclusiveness, access and equity represent crucial factors in justifying frameworks;  Lifelong learning involves far more than educational policies alone;
  • 14. 5. Challenges  Tension between quality and goals of broadening access;  Governments need to understand that the shift to an outcomes-based approach has many implications for assessment, validation and certification and learning and teaching strategies in a lifelong learning system that recognises a diversification of learning paths.
  • 15. 5. Challenges  Lifelong learning needs to go beyond skills and knowledge to include personal attributes like honesty and creativity; humanistic values, active citizenship and democratic participation;  The challenge is to go from the systemic level to the user and provider level;  Consultation at the bottom levels is necessary.
  • 16. 5. Challenges  Efforts are needed to overcome poor quality of non-formal education;  The professional development of trainers, teachers, assessors, guiders and counsellors engaged in recognition practices within non-formal education,  Strengthening formal education and training structures (curricula, teaching practices)
  • 17. Concluding statement The concept of lifelong learning as an organising principle and integrative approach to personal, social and economic development has considerable potential in overcoming these challenges
  • 18. Muchas gracias Dra Madhu Singh UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning Feldbrunnenstr. 58 20148 Hamburg Germany m.singh@unesco.org

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