Oliver: Introducing RDA
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Oliver: Introducing RDA

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  • Fallingwater Frank Lloyd Wright
  • Objectives 0.4.2.1Responsiveness to User NeedsThe data should enable the user to:find resources that correspond to the user's stated search criteriafind all resources that embody a particular work or a particular expression of that workfind all resources associated with a particular person, family, or corporate bodyfind all resources on a given subjectfind works, expressions, manifestations, and items that are related to those retrieved in response to the user's searchfind persons, families, and corporate bodies that correspond to the user's stated search criteriafind persons, families, or corporate bodies that are related to the person, family, or corporate body represented by the data retrieved in response to the user’s searchidentify the resource described (i.e., confirm that the resource described corresponds to the resource sought, or distinguish between two or more resources with the same or similar characteristics)identify the person, family, or corporate body represented by the data (i.e., confirm that the entity described corresponds to the entity sought, or distinguish between two or more entities with the same or similar names, etc.)select a resource that is appropriate to the user’s requirements with respect to the physical characteristics of the carrier and the formatting and encoding of information stored on the carrierselect a resource appropriate to the user's requirements with respect to form, intended audience, language, etc. obtain a resource (i.e., acquire a resource through purchase, loan, etc., or access a resource electronically through an online connection to a remote computer)understand  the relationship between two or more entitiesunderstand  the relationship between the entity described and a name by which that entity is known (e.g., a different language form of the name)understand why a particular name or title has been chosen as the preferred name or title for the entity.0.4.2.2Cost EfficiencyThe data should meet functional requirements for the support of user tasks in a cost-efficient manner.0.4.2.3Flexibility The data should function independently of the format, medium, or system used to store or communicate the data. They should be amenable to use in a variety of environments.0.4.2.4Continuity The data should be amenable to integration into existing databases (particularly those developed using AACR and related standards).Differentiation The data describing a resource should differentiate that resource from other resources.The data describing an entity associated with a resource should differentiate that entity from other entities, and from other identities used by the same entity.0.4.3.2Sufficiency The data describing a resource should be sufficient to meet the needs of the user with respect to selection of an appropriate resource.0.4.3.3Relationships The data describing a resource should indicate significant relationships between the resource described and other resources.The data describing an entity associated with a resource should reflect all significant bibliographic relationships between that entity and other such entities.0.4.3.4Representation The data describing a resource should reflect the resource’s representation of itself.The name or form of name designated as the preferred name for a person, family, or corporate body should be the name or form of name most commonly found in resources associated with that person, family, or corporate body, or a well-accepted name or form of name in the language and script preferred by the agency creating the data. Other names and other forms of the name that are found in resources associated with the person, family, or corporate body or in reference sources, or that the user might be expected to use when conducting a search, should be recorded as variant names.The title designated as the preferred title for a work should be the title most frequently found in resources embodying the work in its original language, the title as found in reference sources, or the title most frequently found in resources embodying the work. Other titles found in resources embodying the work or in reference sources, or that the user might be expected to use when conducting a search, should be recorded as variant titles.0.4.3.5Accuracy The data describing a resource should provide supplementary information to correct or clarify ambiguous, unintelligible, or misleading representations made on sources of information forming part of the resource itself.0.4.3.6Attribution The data recording relationships between a resource and a person, family, or corporate body associated with that resource should reflect attributions of responsibility made either in the resource itself or in reference sources, irrespective of whether the attribution of responsibility is accurate.0.4.3.7Common Usage or PracticeData that is not transcribed from the resource itself should reflect common usage in the language and script preferred by the agency creating the data.The part of the name of a person or family used as the first element in recording the preferred name for that person or family should reflect conventions used in the country and language most closely associated with that person or family.0.4.3.8Uniformity The appendices on capitalization, abbreviations, order of elements, punctuation, etc., should serve to promote uniformity in the presentation of data describing a resource or an entity associated with a resource.
  • Objectives 0.4.2.1Responsiveness to User NeedsThe data should enable the user to:find resources that correspond to the user's stated search criteriafind all resources that embody a particular work or a particular expression of that workfind all resources associated with a particular person, family, or corporate bodyfind all resources on a given subjectfind works, expressions, manifestations, and items that are related to those retrieved in response to the user's searchfind persons, families, and corporate bodies that correspond to the user's stated search criteriafind persons, families, or corporate bodies that are related to the person, family, or corporate body represented by the data retrieved in response to the user’s searchidentify the resource described (i.e., confirm that the resource described corresponds to the resource sought, or distinguish between two or more resources with the same or similar characteristics)identify the person, family, or corporate body represented by the data (i.e., confirm that the entity described corresponds to the entity sought, or distinguish between two or more entities with the same or similar names, etc.)select a resource that is appropriate to the user’s requirements with respect to the physical characteristics of the carrier and the formatting and encoding of information stored on the carrierselect a resource appropriate to the user's requirements with respect to form, intended audience, language, etc. obtain a resource (i.e., acquire a resource through purchase, loan, etc., or access a resource electronically through an online connection to a remote computer)understand  the relationship between two or more entitiesunderstand  the relationship between the entity described and a name by which that entity is known (e.g., a different language form of the name)understand why a particular name or title has been chosen as the preferred name or title for the entity.0.4.2.2Cost EfficiencyThe data should meet functional requirements for the support of user tasks in a cost-efficient manner.0.4.2.3Flexibility The data should function independently of the format, medium, or system used to store or communicate the data. They should be amenable to use in a variety of environments.0.4.2.4Continuity The data should be amenable to integration into existing databases (particularly those developed using AACR and related standards).Differentiation The data describing a resource should differentiate that resource from other resources.The data describing an entity associated with a resource should differentiate that entity from other entities, and from other identities used by the same entity.0.4.3.2Sufficiency The data describing a resource should be sufficient to meet the needs of the user with respect to selection of an appropriate resource.0.4.3.3Relationships The data describing a resource should indicate significant relationships between the resource described and other resources.The data describing an entity associated with a resource should reflect all significant bibliographic relationships between that entity and other such entities.0.4.3.4Representation The data describing a resource should reflect the resource’s representation of itself.The name or form of name designated as the preferred name for a person, family, or corporate body should be the name or form of name most commonly found in resources associated with that person, family, or corporate body, or a well-accepted name or form of name in the language and script preferred by the agency creating the data. Other names and other forms of the name that are found in resources associated with the person, family, or corporate body or in reference sources, or that the user might be expected to use when conducting a search, should be recorded as variant names.The title designated as the preferred title for a work should be the title most frequently found in resources embodying the work in its original language, the title as found in reference sources, or the title most frequently found in resources embodying the work. Other titles found in resources embodying the work or in reference sources, or that the user might be expected to use when conducting a search, should be recorded as variant titles.0.4.3.5Accuracy The data describing a resource should provide supplementary information to correct or clarify ambiguous, unintelligible, or misleading representations made on sources of information forming part of the resource itself.0.4.3.6Attribution The data recording relationships between a resource and a person, family, or corporate body associated with that resource should reflect attributions of responsibility made either in the resource itself or in reference sources, irrespective of whether the attribution of responsibility is accurate.0.4.3.7Common Usage or PracticeData that is not transcribed from the resource itself should reflect common usage in the language and script preferred by the agency creating the data.The part of the name of a person or family used as the first element in recording the preferred name for that person or family should reflect conventions used in the country and language most closely associated with that person or family.0.4.3.8Uniformity The appendices on capitalization, abbreviations, order of elements, punctuation, etc., should serve to promote uniformity in the presentation of data describing a resource or an entity associated with a resource.

Oliver: Introducing RDA Oliver: Introducing RDA Presentation Transcript

  • 1 Introducing RDA January 29th, 2014 Chris Oliver McGill University chris.oliver@mcgill.ca
  • 2 Plan not a training session aim: understand some of the key differences between RDA and AACR2 --- to make training sessions easier 1. transition to RDA 2. key concepts and their visible impact on RDA a) theoretical framework b) objectives and principles c) focus on the user d) content standard e) bibliographic information as data
  • 3 1. Transition to RDA
  • 4 AACR2  successful standard  adopted by many countries  in use for many years but problems with AACR2 for example: • written for card catalogues • inadequate rules to describe new types of resources • inconsistencies • library specific
  • 5 RDA  new metadata standard that replaces AACR2  set of practical instructions objectives: • address problems and limitations in AACR2 • record better metadata to support better resource discovery • record data for the web and linked data environment • record data that allows us to connect beyond the library community
  • 6 Timeline 1997 problems identified: International Conference on the Principles & Future Development of AACR, Toronto, Ontario 1998-2004 revisions to AACR2 2004 AACR3 2005 new standard: Resource Description and Access 2009 RDA text completed 2010 RDA text + software – standard is a web tool 2010-2013 laying the groundwork for implementation
  • 7 March 31st, 2013 official start of implementation Library of Congress LC’s official implementation date Program for Cooperative Cataloging Day 1 for the NACO Authority File ... but some libraries had never stopped using RDA after the test period ended December 31, 2010
  • 8 What happened on March 31, 2013? • all new authority records contributed to LC/NACO authority file = RDA • all records coded pcc = all RDA access points all records coded pcc whether: • RDA description or • AACR2 description • LC completed training for all its cataloging staff and all LC records are only RDA records
  • 9 March 31, 2013 onwards • landscape began changing quickly • rapid rise in number of RDA bibliographic records • changes in NACO authority file implications if use NACO authority records implications for copy cataloging • but different institutions will make the transition at different speeds
  • 10 Transition in phases Phase 1: emphasis on continuity RDA data in MARC 21 RDA and AACR records in one catalogue still use bibliographic and authority records some new fields some changed instructions some new instructions BUT >>> thinking about bibliographic information differently
  • 11 Phase 1 = starting down new track RDA • moves us to a new track • starts us on a promising track for the future use of our metadata • what we see now is only the beginning
  • 12 2. Key concepts in RDA
  • 13 AACR2 RDA • continue to record the title • continue to record the statement of responsibility • continue to record the date of publication But … • new vocabulary • new way of thinking about how we do these steps • new underlying framework
  • 14 Similar, but ... AACR2 1.2B1. Transcribe the edition statement as found on the item. Use abbreviations as instructed in appendix B and numerals as instructed in appendix C. RDA 2.5.1.4. Transcribe an edition statement as it appears on the source of information. No instruction to abbreviate or to convert to arabic numerals.
  • 15 Similar, but ... • serious adherence to the principle of representation “take what you see” t.p. data recorded 3rd ed. 3rd ed. Second edition Second edition
  • 16 AACR2 stones plus framework
  • 17 AACR2 deconstructed without the framework
  • 18 RDA stones plus new framework
  • 19 RDA: similarities & differences AACR2 deconstructed new concepts and structure some new instructions some changed instructions
  • 20 Familiarity with key RDA concepts • many of the differences between RDA and AACR2 trace back to the key concepts in RDA • useful handholds to grasp RDA
  • 21 2. Key concepts in RDA a) theoretical framework
  • 22 RDA’s theoretical framework • aligned with the FRBR and FRAD conceptual models FRBR Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records 1998 FRAD Functional Requirements for Authority Data 2009 FRAD is an extension of the FRBR model • both models developed under the auspices of IFLA • broad base of international consensus and support
  • 23 The two models • widely used data modeling technique: entity relationship model • entities • attributes • relationships • analyze bibliographic and authority data from the point of view of how that data is used
  • 24 FRBR/FRAD and RDA • focus on user and how the data helps a user in the process of resource discovery • vocabulary for example entities – attributes – relationships the 11 bibliographic entities • clear and consistent underlying framework • reference point for future development
  • 25 Bibliographic entities work expression manifestation item FRBR Group 1 products of intellectual or artistic endeavor person family corporate body FRBR/FRAD Group 2 concept object event place FRBR Group 3 responsible for group 1 entities subjects (includes group 1 & 2)
  • 26 1 resource – 4 entities • an item • an exemplar of the Oxford 1998 manifestation • an embodiment of the original English expression • a realization of the work, Hamlet 4 aspects of the resource
  • 27 Organization and Structure of RDA RDA table of contents reflects alignment with FRBR Section 1-4 = Recording attributes Section 1. Recording attributes of manifestation and item Section 2. Recording attributes of work and expression Section 3. Recording attributes of person, family, and corporate body Section 4. Recording attributes of concept, object, event, and place [placeholder]
  • 28 Organization and Structure of RDA Sections 5-10 = Recording Relationships Section 5. Recording primary relationships between work, expression, manifestation, and item Section 6. Recording relationships to persons, families, and corporate bodies associated with a resource Section 7. Recording subject relationships Section 8. Recording relationships between works, expressions, manifestations, and items Section 9. Recording relationships between persons, families, and corporate bodies Section 10. Recording relationships between concepts, objects, events, and places [placeholder] [placeholder]
  • 29 Attributes • attributes = characteristics of the entity for example, entity = person attributes we record: name date of birth entity = a manifestation attributes we record: title proper statement of responsibility edition statement place of publication etc.
  • 30 Relationships: links between entities work item manifestation work manifestation person family created by owned by produced by person family corporate body based on work electronic reproduction manifestation member of founded family corporate body
  • 31 Example of person to resource relationships resource relationship person _______________________________________________________________________________________ Hamlet author William Shakespeare How the light gets in author Louise Penny E. B. White on dogs editor of compilation Martha White Alice in Wonderland illustrator John Tenniel
  • 32 Example of work to work relationships Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Hamlet. subject Modern Hamlets & their soliloquies Critical responses to Hamlet, 1600-1900 imitation (parody of) The Tragicall historie of Shamlet, Prince of Denmark adaptation (based on) Hamlet : the young reader's Shakespeare : a retelling / by Adam McKeown
  • 33 Relationship designators • specify roles (person, family, or corporate body – resource) for example cartographer performer broadcaster former owner issuing body • specify the relationship between resources for example adaptation of paraphrased as electronic reproduction of
  • 34 Relationships in RDA examples with MARC 21 coding: 245 10 $a British Atlantic, American frontier : $b spaces of power in early modern British America / $c Stephen J. Hornsby ; with cartography by Michael J. Hermann. 700 1# $a Herman, Michael J., $e cartographer 245 00 $a Alice in Wonderland, or, What's a nice kid like you doing in a place like this? /$c Hanna-Barbera Productions. 700 1# $i Parody of (work) $a Carroll, Lewis, $d 1832-1898. $t Alice's adventures in Wonderland. authority record 500 3# $w r $i Descendant family: $a Adams (Family)
  • 35 Theoretical framework • alignment with the FRBR and FRAD conceptual models • bibliographic and authority data >>> in terms of entities, attributes + relationships • identify what is important --- how is data used • systematic and coherent framework >>> conceptual clarity >>> logical consistency >>> reference point for further development
  • Why are the models important? broad international support for the explanatory power of the models common international language and conceptual understanding of the bibliographic universe as the foundation for a standard: • easier for others to understand our data • easier to apply in international context • easier for our data to interoperate
  • 37 2. Key concepts in RDA b) objectives and principles
  • 38 RDA Objectives & Principles • important part of RDA • shaped many of the instructions that are different from AACR2 • in line with the International Cataloguing Principles (ICP)
  • 39 RDA Objectives & Principles Objectives RDA 0.4.2 Principles • responsiveness to user • differentiation needs • cost efficiency • flexibility • continuity RDA 0.4.3 • sufficiency • relationships • representation • accuracy • attribution • common usage or practice • uniformity
  • 40 Principle of representation for example RDA 0.4.3.4 principle = representation The data describing a resource should reflect the resource’s representation of itself. result = simplify transcription “Take what you see”
  • 41 RDA = Take what you see source = AACR2 = RDA = Kemptville, Ontario Kemptville, Ont. Kemptville, Ontario 264 1 $a Kemptville, Ontario _____________________________________________________ source = AACR2 = RDA = Band LXXXVIII (series numbering) Bd. 88 Band LXXXVIII 490 $a ... ; $v Band LXXXVIII
  • 42 RDA = Take what you see source = Third revised edition AACR2 = 3rd rev. ed. RDA = Third revised edition _____________________________________________ source = AACR2 = RDA = 2nd enlarged ed., revised 2nd enl. ed., rev. 2nd enlarged ed., revised
  • 43 Different instructions AACR2 1.0F. Inaccuracies In an area where transcription from the item is required, transcribe an inaccuracy or a misspelled word as it appears in the item. Follow such an inaccuracy either by [sic] or by i.e. and the correction within square brackets. Supply a missing letter or letters in square brackets. RDA 1.7.9 Inaccuracies When instructed to transcribe an element as it appears on the source of information, transcribe an inaccuracy or a misspelled word as it appears on the source, except where instructed otherwise.
  • 44 Inaccuracy in RDA • make a note correcting the inaccuracy if considered important for identification or access (see 2.20 ) • if inaccuracy in the title proper, record a corrected form of the title as a variant title Exception for serials or integrating resources: correct obvious typographic errors, and make a note
  • 45 RDA = Take what you see title page (book) = Melallization of polymers AACR2 = Melallization [sic] of polymers or Melallization [i.e. Metallization] of polymers RDA = Melallization of polymers 245 14 $a Melallization of polymers 246 1 $i Corrected title: $a Metallization of polymers
  • 46 2. Key concepts in RDA c) focus on the user
  • 47 RDA Objectives & Principles Objectives RDA 0.4.2 Principles • responsiveness to user • differentiation needs • cost efficiency • flexibility • continuity RDA 0.4.3 • sufficiency • relationships • representation • accuracy • attribution • common usage or practice • uniformity
  • 48 Focus on the user how do I respond to user needs? record data that is important to the user why is it important? helps the user to RDA 0.0 find identify select obtain “record data to support resource discovery”
  • 49 Resource discovery = user tasks Bibliographic data Authority data from FRBR from FRAD • find • find • identify • identify • select • clarify • obtain • understand Why record the data? To help user achieve these tasks.
  • 50 Basis for cataloger judgment • instructions encourage cataloger judgment --- based on user tasks for example, from 3.7 Applied material Record the applied material used in the resource if it is considered important for identification or selection …
  • 51 Easier for user to identify AACR2 RDA Description: [37] p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm. Description: 37 unnumbered pages : illustrations (color) ; 28 cm Description: 86, [21] p. : ill., port. : 24 cm. Description: 86 pages, 21 unnumbered pages : illustrations, portrait ; 24 cm • avoid abbreviations • avoid cryptic information
  • 52 Easier for user to understand AACR2 RDA Title: Architecture / by Susan Brown … [et al.]. Title: Architecture / by Susan Brown [and four others] Published: [S.l. : s.n.], 1852. Published: [Place of publication not identified] : [publisher not identified], 1852.
  • 53 Easier for user to find, identify RDA: no more: rule of three no more … [et al.] in description if statement of responsibility names more than one person >>> record all RDA 2.4.1.5 optional omission: record first named and summarize the omission [and six others] access points for first named or principal or all or cataloger judgment or institutional policy core
  • 54 Easier for user to find, identify AACR2 RDA Seeking the sacred / in conversation with Thomas Moore … [et al.]. Seeking the sacred / in conversation with Thomas Moore, Marion Woodman, Roméo D’Allaire, Stephen Lewis, Martin Rutte. or Seeking the sacred / in conversation with Thomas Moore [and four others]. access point for first, or all access point for first
  • 55 Easier for user to find AACR2 Aesop’s fables. Polyglot. RDA Aesop’s fables. Greek Aesop’s fables. Latin Aesop’s fables. English Aesop’s fables. German AACR2 Aesop’s fables. English & German RDA Aesop’s fables. English Aesop’s fables. German
  • 56 2. Key concepts in RDA d) content standard e) bibliographic information as data
  • 57 Poll Have you heard of: • semantic web • linked data or linked open data • “BIBFRAME” or bibliographic framework initiative?
  • 58 2. Key concepts in RDA d) content standard
  • 59 RDA as a content standard AACR2: MARC encoding + ISBD display RDA = what data should the cataloger record? • possible to encode using many encoding systems • can be encoded using MARC • does not have to be encoded using MARC encoding • can be used with web friendly XML based encoding schema, such MODS • data for the linked open data environment • possible to encode and display the data in many ways
  • 60 RDA as a content standard RDA= instructions on recording data not tied to one encoding practice RDA= record person’s date of birth = 1982 Encode? $d 1982- MARC 21 <subfield code="d">1982- </subfield> MARCXML <mods:namePart type="date">1982- </mods:namePart> <dob>1982</dob> <xs:element name="rdaDateOfBirth“>1982</xs:element>
  • 61 RDA as a content standard RDA= instructions on recording data not tied to one display of data for example, create displays that suit your user group RDA says: record person’s date of birth = 1982 Display? born 1982 b. 1982 1982date of birth: 1982
  • 62 Identifying the entity either eye-readable data: name date of birth and death Shields, Carol, 1953-2003 and/or machine actionable data: identifier 0101A6635 http://viaf.org/viaf/4944537/#Shields,_Carol
  • 63 Visible data • users expect that all metadata is on the web library data needs to be visible on the web BUT • online catalog = closed database • invisible to web search engines “dark data” • MARC 21 = library specific record format • web cannot access and use MARC data • not used in other cultural heritage communities
  • 64 RDA as a content standard • not locked into library encoding practices • not locked into library display practices • get out of the library silo
  • 65 2. Key concepts in RDA e) bibliographic information as data
  • 66 RDA data = precise + usable data RDA • each element of data is distinct and precisely defined • each element contains only one kind of data • controlled vocabulary in many elements  each element has the potential to be usable: to index to search to build meaningful displays of data  data in any element can be used: by humans by computers
  • 67 AACR2 for example AACR2: information embedded in non-specific places notes physical description MARC 538 516 500 300 digital file characteristics file type encoding format file size resolution regional encoding transmission speed
  • 68 RDA RDA: precise elements and element sub-types digital file characteristics file type encoding format file size resolution regional encoding transmission speed RDA 3.19
  • 69 347 Digital file characteristics new MARC field 347 subfield codes $a - File type (R) $b - Encoding format (R) $c - File size (R) $d - Resolution (R) $e - Regional encoding (R) $f - Transmission speed (R)
  • 70 AACR2 information AACR2: assume human will decipher ok to be ambiguous AACR2: date of publication, distribution, etc. date of copyright date of manufacture MARC 21: 260 $c 260 $g
  • 71 RDA data elements RDA: precise elements – only one kind of data in an element RDA: 5 different elements: RDA 2.7-2.11 date of production date of publication date of distribution date of manufacture date of copyright MARC 21: 264 $c 5 different indicators
  • 72 Controlled vocabulary • controlled vocabulary recommended for many elements encoding format DAISY, CD audio, MP3, Access, XML, JPEG, TIFF, CAD, PDF, Blu-ray, DVD video, VCD production method blueline, blueprint, engraving, etching, lithograph, photocopy, photoengraving, woodcut creator relationship artist, author, cartographer, choreographer, composer, enacting jurisdiction, interviewee, inventor
  • 73 Many new elements many new elements but do not have to use them all core elements • not a level of description • core elements are a minimum “a floor, not a ceiling” • must include any additional elements required to differentiate the resource or entity from a similar one • inclusion of other elements --- cataloger judgment
  • 74 Phase 1: RDA using MARC Bibliographic description: • core elements (RDA core, LC-PCC core) • new MARC fields • simplified instructions for transcription • some new instructions when recording data Authorized access points in bibliographic records: • LC/NACO authority file • some new instructions when identifying persons, families, corporate bodies, works and expressions Authority records: • NACO guidelines
  • 75 AACR2: simple book (abbreviated) 020 $a 9780230242685 (hardback) 100 1 $a Stanfield, J. Ron, $d 1945245 10 $a John Kenneth Galbraith / $c by James Ronald Stanfield and Jacqueline Bloom Stanfield. 260 $a New York : $b Palgrave Macmillan, $c c2011. 300 $a xi, 251 p. ; $c 23 cm. 490 1 $a Great Thinkers in Economics Series 700 1 $a Stanfield, Jacqueline Bloom, $d 1947-
  • 76 RDA: simple book (abbreviated) 020 $a 9780230242685 (hardback) 100 1 $a Stanfield, J. Ron, $d 1945- $e author. 245 10 $a John Kenneth Galbraith / $c by James Ronald Stanfield and Jacqueline Bloom Stanfield. 264 1 $a New York : $b Palgrave Macmillan, $c [2011] 264 4 $a ©2011 300 $a xi, 251 pages ; $c 23 cm. 336 $a text $2 rdacontent 337 $a unmediated $2 rdamedia 338 $a volume $2 rdacarrier 490 1 $a Great Thinkers in Economics Series 700 1 $a Stanfield, Jacqueline Bloom, $d 1947- $e author.
  • 77 AACR2: sound disc (abbreviated) 100 1 $a Dibdin, Michael. 245 10 $a End games $h[sound recording] / $c Michael Dibdin. 260 $a Oxford, England : $b Isis Publishing Ltd., $c p2008. 300 $a 10 sound discs (11 hr., 15 min.) : $b digital ; $c 4 3/4 in. 500 $a Read by Michael Tudor Barnes. 500 $a Compact discs. 700 1 $a Barnes, Michael Tudor.
  • 78 RDA: audio disc (abbreviated) 100 1 $a Dibdin, Michael, $e author. 240 10 $a End games. $h Spoken word 245 10 $a End games / $c Michael Dibdin. 264 1 $a Oxford, England : $b Isis Publishing Limited, $c [2008] 264 4 $c ℗2008 300 $a 10 audio discs (11 hr., 15 min.) : $b CD audio, digital ; $c 4 3/4 in. 336 $a spoken word $2 rdacontent 337 $a audio $2 rdamedia 338 $a audio disc $2 rdacarrier 344 $a digital 347 $b CD audio 700 1 $a Barnes, Michael Tudor, $e narrator. 775 08 $i Adaptation of (expression): $a Dibdin, Michael. $t End games. ...
  • 79 AACR2: compilation (abbreviated) 100 1 $a Williams, Tennessee. 240 10 $a Selections. $f 2009 245 10 $a Favorite plays and a short story / $c Tennessee Williams. 260 0 $a Boston : $b University Press, $c 2009. 300 $a 325 p. : $b ill. ; $c 28 cm 505 0 $a The Glass Menagerie -- A Streetcar Named Desire -- Cat on a Hot Tin Roof -- The Night of the Iguana.
  • 80 RDA: compilation (abbreviated) 100 1 $a Williams, Tennessee. 240 10 $a Works. $k Selections. $f 2009 245 10 $a Favorite plays and a short story / $c Tennessee Williams. 264 1 $a Boston : $b University Press, $c 2009. 300 $a 325 pages : $b illustrations ; $c 28 cm 336 $a text $2 rdacontent 337 $a unmediated $2 rdamedia 338 $a volume $2 rdacarrier 700 12 $a Williams, Tennessee. $t Glass menagerie. 700 12 $a Williams, Tennessee. $t Streetcar named Desire. 700 12 $a Williams, Tennessee. $t Cat on a hot tin roof. 700 12 $a Williams, Tennessee. $t Night of the Iguana. optional optional optional optional
  • 81 Key concepts Key concepts shape RDA: • theoretical framework • objectives and principles • focus on the user • content standard • bibliographic information as data >>> visible impact on RDA and the content of instructions >>> many changes in RDA trace back to concepts
  • 82 Familiarity with key RDA concepts • a useful way to grab hold of RDA
  • 83 Flickr credits: creative commons attribution Cross track – iPhone wall paper by CJ Schmit http://www.flickr.com/photos/cjschmit/4623783487/ Road-Side History by Owls Flight Photography http://www.flickr.com/photos/kevinhooa/2370449243/ Old stones of Bauda Byzantine ruins by Hovic http://www.flickr.com/photos/200000/2304353314/ Falling water by spike55151 http://www.flickr.com/photos/spike55151/14471574/ Rock climbing is fun by mariachily http://www.flickr.com/photos/mariachily/3382799213/ Oregon silo by TooFarNorth http://www.flickr.com/photos/toofarnorth/4597980984/
  • 84 Questions … ? chris.oliver@mcgill.ca