How to Teach Online
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How to Teach Online

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  • Michele Martin, whose Bamboo Project blog remains a wonderful resource on a variety of topics, wrote one of the best pieces we’ve ever seen for anyone diving into online training-teaching-learning: <br /> “9 Lessons Learned from Running My First Webinar,” posted in January 2008 <br /> http://michelemartin.typepad.com/thebambooprojectblog/2008/01/what-i-learned.html <br /> Her nine tips include: <br /> Quadrupling your prep time for online sessions over the amount of time you spend on face-to-face sessions <br /> Write a script <br /> Practice, practice, practice (to which we would add, “then practice some more”) <br /> Having at least two people involved (our own addition is to never overlook the important of a first-rate producer) <br /> Deviating from the script and not shying away from the use of humor <br />
  • By the way, did we mention the importance of practice when we were reviewing Michele’s tips on the previous slide? <br /> Here are more tips from Dan: <br /> The technical aspect of running a webinar is always going to be a series of many small steps. <br /> It’s not likely that any of these steps are going to be a huge challenge, but there are going to be a lot of them and they will all be essential. <br /> You need to be able to complete these steps without thinking about it so you can focus on your content, not the technical steps. <br /> Before you actually do a live session, you should practice enough that you can launch and prepare the session without looking at a cheat sheet. That being said… <br />
  • Jennifer Hofmann, an e-learning consultant and president of InSync Training, LLC, combines summaries, tips, and examples to familiarize trainers and others with the challenges of creating and conducting successful online sessions. The introductory chapter to the book includes a valuable and detailed table of features commonly found in live online learning environments; the table is accompanied with illustrations to help readers understand how each feature works. The second chapter, “Facilitating in the Synchronous Classroom,” is a wonderful primer which outlines facilitators’ roles in directing learning while helping participants communicate and collaborate online; reminds presenters and facilitators that flexibility and an ability to work well in stressful situations are key components to success in online presentations; and discusses key resources—including the use of a producer or assistant—for those engaged in online presentations. The remainder of the book provides suggestions for facilitating effective communication, managing the online learning environment and technology, and conducting online meetings and other live events. Among the appendices are a “Synchronous Software Features Checklist,” “Synchronous Classroom Management Checklists,” additional “Recommended Resources for Synchronous and Blended e-Learning,” and a glossary of terms for those unfamiliar with online learning. <br />
  • Let’s stop for a moment so you can think about what we’ve been discussing. <br /> Feel free to ask questions. <br /> Here’s one for you: <br /> What experience do you have that suggests onsite learning does or does not trump online learning? <br />
  • Unless you arrived for today’s session more than 30 minutes early, you found the two of us waiting for you at the virtual door—and this is something we would do onsite as well as online. <br /> Being there when learners arrive provides a magnificent opportunity to quickly establish the sort of environment that fosters learning successes. When we’re face-to-face with learners, we chat with them before our onsite sessions begin. When we’re online, we engage in the same sort of chat via the chat window or any other opportunities we have to interact through the various online platforms we use. <br />
  • Deferring or ignoring a learner’s questions in a face-to-face setting is one sure way to kill the learner’s interest. The same is true in an online setting. <br /> Catching and responding to questions posed via chat is essential, so it’s important to encourage rather than discourage interactions at that level, and it’s also very important to let people know up front that you may not have time to respond to all questions during your live session and that you’re open to follow-up questions via email or any other means of communication available to you and your learners. <br /> We’ve been in sessions with a small number of learners and been able to keep up, and we’ve also been involved in sessions with hundreds of learners, where the chat questions and comments race by at the speed of light. The key in either situation is to remain responsive and accessible—which is challenging and invigorating at the same time! <br />
  • Bonnie Elbaum, Cynthia McIntyre, and Alese Smith, all affiliated with the Concord Consortium in Massachusetts at the time their book was published, offer what they consider to be the seventeen essential steps of preparing online learning sessions which will keep instructors and learners equally engaged. The book opens with a section on preparing an online course and includes tips on how to build a course outline, set clear deadlines to encourage effective learning, and planning for quality. The middle section of the book moves into elements of designing a course which helps students maintain their focus, develop effective collaborations which foster learning, and literally stay on course. The concluding section on how to teach online is followed by an extensive checklist which summarizes the contents of the entire book for anyone involved in developing and delivering online learning opportunities. <br /> What’s helpful to us here is the reminder the great online teaching-training-learning has much in common with great onsite teaching-training-learning: it requires tremendous preparation and follow-through. <br />
  • Let’s stop for our second reflection and observation exchange: <br /> What do you do in training-teaching-learning that is the same onsite as online? <br /> What do you do in training-teaching-learning that is different onsite as opposed to online? <br />
  • Chip and Dan Heath really created a seminal work for all of us with Made to Stick. It reminds us of the power of strong storytelling as a tool in learning and many other venues, and offers a simple formula with six principles tied together with the acronym “SUCCESS”: <br /> Simplicity <br /> Unexpectedness <br /> Concreteness <br /> Credibility <br /> Emotions <br /> Stories <br />
  • Rena Palloff and Keith Pratt, building from work which began while they were Ph.D. students in 1993, offer an educators&apos; view of how to create and sustain effective online learning opportunities which lead to communities of learning. Their focus is on "teaching and learning" rather than on technology (p. xvii); the result is rewarding and inspirational. The first of the two sections of the book concentrates on the philosophy and mechanics of developing communities of learning online; the second section explores hands-on methods for producing those communities and includes explicit guidance on how to inspire collaboration by providing learners with clear guidelines as well as effective facilitation and feedback (pp. 111-125). A chapter on transformative learning (pp. 129-143) makes a strong case for how effective online learning can be by providing learners with time for engagement and reflection, and also reminds readers that effective online learning is a learner-centered process (p. 135). Sample course outlines, syllabi, lists of learning objectives, and online course guidelines make this an indispensable tool for anyone involved in online presentations and online learning. (Note: updated edition was published in 2007.) <br />
  • If you want to build engagement, turning to social media outlets to supplement interactions can be extremely effective, as we discovered when we used Facebook private groups as a way to connect learners via weekly optional office hours online <br /> description of how this worked, as documented in blog: <br /> http://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/learning-social-media-with-our-learners-pt-2-office-hours-in-facebook/ <br />
  • Google+ Hangouts offers similar opportunities for online office hours, and more… <br /> http://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com/2013/01/31/learning-social-media-with-our-learners-pt-3-office-hours-in-a-google-hangout/ <br />
  • Live facilitated chats on Twitter are fairly common approaches to creating engaging learning opportunities… <br /> http://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com/2013/02/07/etmooc-tweet-chat-navigating-streams-and-rivers/ <br />
  • Skype is yet another option, particularly for just-in-time one-on-one learning opportunities… <br /> http://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com/2010/01/22/skype-and-low-cost-e-learning-delivered-at-the-moment-of-need/ <br />
  • Polling can be very successful in at least two ways: <br /> You can gain information about your learners so you can engage in last-minute course corrections. <br /> You can engage the learners by making them participants in the session—you learn about them while they are learning from each other. <br /> This sample from one of Dan’s earlier online sessions might help you see ways you can immediately apply this to your own work. <br />
  • Let’s stop for our third reflection and observation exchange: <br /> What do you do to build engagement and audience participation in training-teaching-learning? <br />
  • An interesting point of divergence between the two of us: <br /> Dan cites the general 90-seconds-per-slide guideline <br /> Paul has heard a variety of opinions and explored a variety of options on this one, and has experience keeping slides up for as little as a few seconds and as long as several minutes as long as learners are engaged in some fashion such as online chat or an exercise or discussion. <br />
  • Another interesting point of divergence between the two of us: <br /> Dan uses a combination of bullet points and images. <br /> Paul tends to keep slides as text-free as possible and tries to create a visual narrative flow that complements the overall flow of brief text headlines and the overall flow of a presentation. (Good resource for this: Cliff Atkinson’s Beyond Bullet Points) <br />
  • Let’s stop for our fourth reflection and observation exchange: <br /> What different formats do you use for online presentations? <br />
  • If you’re already a trainer-teacher-learner who engages in experiential learning—facilitating as much, if not more, than lecturing—you have a skill well worth cultivating with online learners. Much of what is extremely effective online involves an ability to not only share information you have, but to engage learners by encouraging them to interact with each other via chat as well as video-conferencing interactions if you have those capabilities. <br /> Think Google Hangouts, here, and you’ll see what we mean: <br /> In a very high-end example of connecting learners via Hangouts, photographer John Butterill has arranged for live virtual photo walks that reach a variety of learners—including those who are homebound. If you want to see an extremely moving example, check out Butterill’s video on YouTube at: <br /> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1Uv7as5ZmI <br />
  • Listening always serves us well in onsite settings as we listen to what our learners are saying and adjust our lessons to respond to what we hear. This is just as essential online as we monitor what is taking place in chat and respond to comments and questions that come our way. <br />
  • Great learning that sparks results often comes from immediately applying what is learned and from creating an environment in which the learning is supported. If we encourage our learners by suggesting concrete actions to be taken immediately after they leave us, we increase the possibility that they will absorb and retain what we offer. And if we’re in a position to be sure that their colleagues and supervisors will support their attempts to use what they’ve learned, we’re in an even better position to foster success. <br />
  • Let’s stop for our fifth reflection and observation exchange: <br /> How do you bring your in-person strengths to online presentations? <br />
  • Whether we’re new to the art of presentation of are experienced presenter-trainer-teachers benefitting from the useful reminders Weissman provides, he carries us through the presentation cycle with lots of guidance, including warnings of how we can go wrong: not offering clear points, not offering a clear benefit to our audiences (what in it for them, not us), not creating a clear flow of thought and information in our work, offering more details than an audience can absorb, or creating presentations that last too long <br />   <br /> He also offers the structure that telling a good story provides: taking listeners from where they are (Point A) to where they need to be (Point B) in ways that focus on them rather than on us. He provides a concise survey of structures we can incorporate into presentations to make them flow and reminds us of the importance of “verbalization”—rehearsing our work out loud “just as you will on the day of your actual presentation” (p. 164) numerous times so that the story that is at the heart of all we do will flow naturally from us to those who are depending on us to make that all-important journey from Point A to Point B. Furthermore, he models the very skills he is trying to develop by incorporating presentation stories throughout his book in an effort to help us understand the process viscerally as well as intellectually. <br />
  • We could spend days, weeks, or months exploring our own comfort zones, but what it really comes down to in a session like today’s in thinking about the possibilities we’ve explored as well as what you already feel comfortable doing in familiar settings, then pushing yourself to go a bit further to see how you and your learners can have more fun. <br /> After all, learning that is fun, engaging, and responsive to an immediate need is likely to be learning that sticks. It’s up to us to identify how close we can move toward success for ourselves, our learners, and all they serve. <br />
  • Let’s stop for our final reflection and observation exchange: <br /> How would you describe your own comfort zone? <br />
  • Let’s do a quick summary of what we’ve discussed… <br /> We began with a reminder the online learning can be every bit as effective as onsite learning, and looked to Michele Martin’s Bamboo Project blog for some tips on how to be successful in your own first webinar. <br />
  • We then discussed some similarities and differences between onsite and online learning, including the idea that in both settings we need to start by welcoming and engaging our learners. <br />
  • We talked about a variety of ways to engage learners, even exploring the idea of virtual office hours and one-on-one online instruction through Facebook, Google Hangouts, live chats via Twitter, and sessions using Skype. <br />
  • Our review of online-presentation formats included slides that are visually appealing, and we also reminded you of some possibilities including screen-sharing. <br />
  • We concluded with sections on bringing your in-person strengths to online presentations as well as finding your comfort zone, and that included the overall reminder that if we and our learners listen, understand, and act, we will all be engaged in effective and productive training-teaching-learning. <br />
  • A quick review of some of the sources cited… <br />

How to Teach Online How to Teach Online Presentation Transcript

  • Session Facilitators Paul Signorelli How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli Thursday, January 16, 2014 Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Accomplishing Online What You Accomplish Onsite How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Webinar Cons…and Pros • Con: You aren’t staring out at the sea of faces, so you don’t really know how engaged your audience is • Pro: Less pressure • Con: There is a camaraderie factor with inperson sessions that doesn’t exist online • Pro: People are there for the stated purpose only; no side chat, fewer distractions, more focus From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Webinar Cons…and Pros • Con: People are not as engaged with your material because they don’t have physical documents with them. • Pro: That isn’t really true. • Con: Some people are more comfortable than others with the online format. • Pro: For those people, there is an additional layer of learning going on and they are likely to leave more comfortable than they came. From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Running Your First Webinar How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Practice, Practice, Practice… How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Make Cheat Sheets! • Having documentation is absolutely essential: • It gives you a checklist of everything you need to do to launch so you can think about it less • It is a training tool so you can ensure that others will be able to run an events • If there’s some emergency and an untrained person must run the event, the show can still go on From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Designing/Delivering Engaging Learning How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Reflections & Observations #1 How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Presenting Online vs. In-person How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Greeting Them at the Door: How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Being Responsive How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Similarities and Differences How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Running the Event: 1 Person or 2? • The ideal way to do it: 1 Presenter, 1 “Producer” • Producer is responsible for technical aspects: • Launching event; ensuring all settings are correct • Handling audience technical questions • Troubleshooting From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Develop a Plan for Tech Problems • You need two types of tech problem plans: • A plan for the common problems individual attendees may experience • It may take some time to figure out what these are • A plan for a major disaster From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Develop a Plan for End-User Problems • It might take some time before you can figure out what the most common problems are going to be, but you can get a good grip on that by running lots of practice sessions. • Write a script(s) that you can paste into chat. Here’s one of ours: • Sorry you are having a problem with your audio. I'm assuming you are listening via the audio broadcast. If you're audio got interrupted, wait 10-15 seconds, and it should come back. • Be prepared to deal with people who are angry/stressed/panicky • The best approach is a customer service approach, even though the people attending probably aren’t customers. From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Develop a Plan for the Disaster • Disasters can take a lot of forms, but the bottom line is that we’re talking about a situation where your event gets severely disrupted or terminated. • The first step in building a disaster plan is accepting the possibility that this could happen. • You can minimize the possibility, but not eliminate it. From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Develop a Plan for the Disaster • Before deciding what you will do, examine what you can do: • Does your platform give you a way to gather the e-mail addresses of all participants? If so, get that together as part of your preparation. • If the event “dies”, can you quickly relaunch? • Given the size of your group and significance of your event, what’s the possibility of rescheduling? From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Develop a Plan for the Disaster • Develop template e-mails to send to participants: • We just crashed; please re-join • We will need to reschedule • Keep in mind that people are generally pretty understanding when these technical problems occur. From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Reflections & Observations #2 How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Building Engagement and Audience Participation Into Online Instruction How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Stories that Stick How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Finding Your Comfort Zone How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Engagement via Social Media How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Engagement via Social Media How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Engagement via Social Media How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Engagement via Social Media How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Polling to Facilitate Engagement: A Sample from Dan What is your level of experience with webinars? • I have been a webinar instructor/facilitator. • I have attended webinars. • My institution does webinars, but I’ve never attended. • This is my first webinar. From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Reflections & Observations #3 How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Different Formats for Online Presentation How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 The Visual Component of Presentations • The visual component of a webinar is usually a slide deck. • This is much more important in a webinar than an in-person presentation. • Without slides, it’s just a voice. From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Building Your Slides • You don’t need design sense and you don’t need artistic ability. • Base your slides on your outline. • Include images to keep it interesting. (More on this in a moment.) From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Building Your Slides • While most webinar platforms will recognize PDFs and Word Docs, it’s best to work in PowerPoint because: • PowerPoint is universal (more or less). • It’s easy to export to other formats from PowerPoint. • Stick with “common” fonts. From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 How Many Slides? • The number of slides you use will vary heavily depending on your presentation style. • A general guidelines is one slide per 90 seconds, but your results may vary! • Think of your slides from an attendee perspective—do you have enough to keep it interesting? • Using charts and graphs? Slow down! From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Images on Your Slides • Don’t go too text heavy—use images, even if its just ClipArt • There are TONS of sources of free images on the web: • Wikimedia Commons • Flickr (check CC license) • OpenClipArt.com • You don’t need to spend a ton of time worrying about relevance, colors, etc. Modified from “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Building Interactivity into Your Event • Polls • Exercises • Open-ended Questions From “How to Run Great Training Webinars” | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Using Screen Sharing • Use it; don’t abuse it • Great tool for demo’ing software, websites • Not a great tool for sharing your slides • Mind the lag! How to Run Great Training Webinars | Dan Freeman www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Reflections & Observations #4 How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 How to Bring Your In-person Strengths To Online Presentation How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Facilitation How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Listening How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Inspiring Action How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Reflections & Observations #5 How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Finding Your Comfort Zone How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Comfort Through Engagement How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Hitting Your Own Target How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Reflections & Observations #6 How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 How To Teach Online: A Visual Summary How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 How To Teach Online: A Visual Summary How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 How To Teach Online: A Visual Summary How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 How To Teach Online: A Visual Summary How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 How To Teach Online: A Visual Summary How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Resources How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Questions, Comments, and Next Steps How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org
  • For More Information Dan Freeman 50 E. Huron St. Chicago, IL 60614 312.20/5413 dfreeman@ala.org Paul Signorelli & Associates 1032 Irving St., #514 San Francisco, CA 94122 415.681.5224 paul@paulsignorelli.com http://paulsignorelli.com h ttp://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress. com dfreeman@ala.org Twitter: @paulsignorelli @trainersleaders
  • Thursday, January 16, 2014 Credits & Acknowledgements Rodin’s Thinker: From Wrote’s Flickr photostream at http://tinyurl.com/jwpp276 Practice: From Tom Hart’s Flickr photostream at http://tinyurl.com/ldyflzr Welcome: From Margaret Almon’s Flickr photostream at http://tinyurl.com/k48jh6a Mail: From Donovan Beeson’s Flickr photostream at http://tinyurl.com/mtbddaz Listen, Act, and Understand: From Steven Shorrock’s Flickr photostream at http://tinyurl.com/l5mjagn Fireworks: From Aristrocrats-Hat’s Flickr photostream at http://tinyurl.com/kbx3kdh Bullseye: From Nicole Cho’s Flickr photostream at http://tinyurl.com/mcjt7rx Question Marks: From Valerie Everett’s Flicker photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/valeriebb/3006348550/sizes/m/in/photostream/ How to Teach Online -- Freeman and Signorelli www.alatechsource.org