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Gathering and Using Community Data: Making the Best Decisions for Your Library
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Gathering and Using Community Data: Making the Best Decisions for Your Library

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  • 1. GATHERING AND USING COMMUNITY DATA: MAKING THE BEST DECISIONS FOR YOUR LIBRARY Marie Pyko, Public Services Director Thad Hartman, Community and Strategic Services Manager
  • 2. AGENDA INTRODUCTION COMMUNITY DECISIONS WHAT TYPE OF DATA COMMUNITY DATA COLLECTION AND USE PATTERN DATA
  • 3. AGENDA INTERNAL DECISIONS ORGANIZING AROUND THE WORK STAFFING LEVELS AND WHO PROCESS IMPROVEMENT
  • 4. WHY? • Informed Decision Making • Articulate Plans to Decision Makers • Informed Evaluation
  • 5. • Lies, Damned Lies, & Statistics • 58.7% of all statistics are made up • “Say you were standing with one foot in the oven and one foot in an ice bucket. According to the percentage people, you should be perfectly comfortable.” - Bobby Bragan, 1963 • You can’t measure everything
  • 6. • Start with a question, not an answer • What is the question I’m trying to answer? • It’s not the numbers, it’s what they represent • Don’t prove, accumulate evidence • Plan ahead • Decisions will still need to be made
  • 7. COMMUNITY DECISIONS What is the make up of the community Where are they located What do they need from the library
  • 8. WHAT DATA IS ALREADY AVAILABLE IN THE COMMUNITY United Way community Survey Community Resources Council data Heartland Visioning surveys Safe Streets Coalition State and local demographic data School data
  • 9. UNITED WAY COMMUNITY SURVEY
  • 10. COMMUNITY RESOURCE COUNCIL FREE AND REDUCED LUNCH (INDICATOR OF POVERTY) 345 Seaman 372 Silver Lake 437 Auburn Washburn 450 Shawnee Heights 501 Topeka Public Schools 2011 2013 32.83% 18.51% 2012 33.70% 20.32% 34.71% 18.24% 27.98% 31.96% 34.43% 32.05% 33.25% 34.17% 73.86% 75.36% 76.11%
  • 11. COMMUNITY RESOURCES COUNCIL DATA State Assessment- Adequate Yearly Progress School District 2010 •321 Kaw 90.00% Valley •345 Seaman 87.00% •372 Silver Lake 93.30% •437 Auburn 96.20% Washburn •450 Shawnee 78.10% Heights •501 Topeka 69.70% Public Schools 2011 2012 98.60% 93.80% 86.90% 92.50% 84.70% 96.50% 94.80% 90.90% 79.90% 85.70% 69.30% 64.30%
  • 12. INTERNAL DATA
  • 13. USING THE DATA SUMMER READING: REDUCE SUMMER LEARNING LOSS Partnership with school districts to measure the success of summer reading program
  • 14. SUMMER READING • Pilot- 2010 • 1 school district with students who use Accelerated Readers and Star assessments. • School media specialist agreed to compare the students who participated in SRP with students who didn’t • 75% of students who participated maintained or improved their reading scores
  • 15. SUMMER READING PHASE 2 • Expanded partnership and reached two additional school districts. • Schools used MAPS • (Measurement of Academic Progress) • Same process we provided names they provided aggregate scores • Similar results
  • 16. SUMMER READING PHASE 3 • Partnered with biggest school district to brand summer reading with similar reading expectations of regular school. IRead 20. • More students and schools reached the goal in Topeka School District than in the last 5 years. • Results are pending on data comparison
  • 17. SUMMER READING RESULTS INFORMED EVALUATION Online software • Gave us demographic data for planning for the future as well. • Who are we serving and who are we not • Challenged some of our assumptions
  • 18. Summer Reading for Adults
  • 19. Summer Reading Results Goal: Increase the completion rate to at least 10% of the student population in targeted Topeka Public Schools (Lowman Hill, William’s, Ross, Scott, and Randolph) Targeted School 2012 2013 Lowman Hill 6% 5% William’s 6% 8% Ross 3% 2% Scott 3% 4% Randolph 7% 15%
  • 20. COMMUNITY ANALYSIS Approach A cluster is a group of individuals segmented by their behavior and other traits. OrangeBoy Cluster Development provides organizations the opportunity to understand their customers' buying behaviors. We help you segment your customers based on transactional data, behaviors, lifestyle, and media preferences. Clusters serve as the foundation for decision making. This approach allows organizations to build upon the strengths of their customer base rather than assuming all customer needs are the
  • 21. COMMUNITY ANALYSIS Segment Findings • 30 segments are represented indicating significant diversity for the size of the population • The top two segments account for just under one-quarter (23.9%) of the population • The top six segments account for just over half (52%) of the population • The top 12 segments account for 75 percent of the population • The remaining 18 segments account for 21.6 percent of population with an average of 1.2% each, indicating significant fragmentation and diversity
  • 22. Green Acres
  • 23. Approximately 50% of library cardholders live less than 4 miles from the library.
  • 24. Characteristics •23,999 people – 13% of the population •70% are married with & without children •Most are blue collar booms with children 6-17 •Median age is 39 •90% are white Library Stats •9,409 have library cards (39% of the them) •They account for 10.7% of library customers •They circulate 10.5% of items
  • 25. Socioeconomic •College educated & hard working •70% employed in skilled labor, farming, manufacturing, construction •12%+ earn income from self employment Residential •A little bit country… these are rural residents •Own single family homes with some mobile homes •Own 2 or more vehicles… mostly domestic SUV’s, trucks, and garden tractors
  • 26. Preferences •Home improvements: do-it-yourselfers •Gardening: Vegetables •Hobbies: hiking, backpacking, hunting, motorcycles •Read: fishing, hunting & boating magazines •Listen: news-talk radio •Computers: own & use them, probably purchased by catalog •Shop online: clothes, videos, CDs, educational software
  • 27. COMMUNITY SERVICES PLAN Bookmobiles Library @ Work Red Carpet Parks & Rec Partnership Fairs & Events Lockers & Dispensers • Community Partnerships • Digital Branch • Programming / Speakers Bureau • Restructuring / staffing • Material Delivery
  • 28. INTERNAL DECISIONS PROCESS IMPROVEMENT • Spurred by major departmental changes • BHAG • Goals • Develop baseline • Do our staffing decisions follow our goals and priorities? Do we organize around the work? • What changes need to be made based on our goals, how our service and staff are set up, and the quality of service we are providing?
  • 29. DIGITAL SERVICES PROCESS IMPROVEMENT • BHAG - Digital Services enjoys empowering our customers to succeed by giving the best collective, creative solutions to technology by being open and flexible with each other. • How successful are we right now? • Staff surveys
  • 30. Extremely Dissatisfie Dissatisfie d d Neutral Satisfied Extremely Satisfied N/A Averag e AV Setup in Meeting Rooms 0 0 6 29 19 Speed of Resolution 1 4 10 41 18 3.96 How Effectively the Problem is Resolved 1 1 15 38 19 3.99 How Friendly and Courteous 0 6 23 32 12 3.68 Overall Satisfaction 0 3 13 43 15 3.95 17 4.24
  • 31. Why? INTERNAL DECISIONS PROCESS IMPROVEMENT SPECIAL COLLECTIONS • Merging three units Special Collections, Senior Services and Reference BHAG • Special Collections will connect people to their stories by being the best, first and most accessible choice for genealogy and local history.
  • 32. PROCESS IMPROVEMENT SPECIAL COLLECTIONS Service Audit • Who are our customers? • Reference logs- 6 months • What are they doing or needing for Special Collections? • Work logs • What are we doing with our time? • Collection and reference questions and duration
  • 33. Process Improvement Special Collections
  • 34. Work Logs
  • 35. PROCESS IMPROVEMENT SPECIAL COLLECTIONS FOCUS ON LOCAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY Service Plan Goals and Objectives Customer Service Training Programming and Outreach • Space (physical and online) • Collection • • • •
  • 36. OTHER- INTERNAL DECISIONS STAFFING LEVELS AND WHO • Reference logs • Customer use patterns • Questions asked • No logs Books/music/movies/readers advisory Business/jobs/non profits/taxes Computer/internet/printer/scanner/wifi Research/ill Business phone Resident phone Public catalog instruction/unable to use Customer Account/guest pass Misc/study rooms/safety valve/programs Ebooks/eaudio 1-10 min Ebooks/eaudio 11-20 min Ebooks/audio 21+ Ebooks/eaudio total Fax/pos/copier/dispenser Comments/small talk all days weekends 7596 1943 107 17 1918 445 1807 476 1261 204 274 57 229 57 1813 376 1121 227 126 16 42 5 6 1 174 22 1122 194 139 29 Questions all days 1-10 mins 11-20 mins 21+ 16991 520 50 weekends 3927 110 10
  • 37. WRAP UP AND QUESTIONS Thank You Marie Pyko, Public Services Director mpyko@tscpl.org 785/580-4560 Thad Hartman, Community and Strategic Services Manager thartman@tscpl.org 785/580-4511

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