Purchasing E-Books for your Library
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Purchasing E-Books for your Library

on

  • 15,006 views

ALA TechSource workshop presented February 14, 2013

ALA TechSource workshop presented February 14, 2013

Statistics

Views

Total Views
15,006
Views on SlideShare
6,483
Embed Views
8,523

Actions

Likes
11
Downloads
122
Comments
0

54 Embeds 8,523

http://lerebooks.wordpress.com 2845
http://entreestantes.blogspot.com.br 1818
http://entreestantes.blogspot.pt 906
http://www.alatechsource.org 679
http://www.scoop.it 639
http://ebooknoir.wordpress.com 438
http://stephenslighthouse.com 386
http://lonewolflibrarian.wordpress.com 195
http://entreestantes.blogspot.com 129
http://technologyandchange.pbworks.com 95
http://feeds.feedburner.com 88
http://www.nswnet.net 64
http://alfinete2008.blogspot.pt 57
http://www.newsblur.com 16
http://entreestantes.blogspot.fr 15
http://entreestantes.blogspot.com.es 14
http://alfinete2008.blogspot.com 14
http://www-stage.nswnet.net 12
http://newsblur.com 11
http://entreestantes.blogspot.it 9
http://libguides.ashland.edu 8
http://www.entreestantes.blogspot.pt 7
http://www.library.ceu.hu 6
http://entreestantes.blogspot.mx 6
http://entreestantes.blogspot.de 6
http://entreestantes.blogspot.ru 5
http://entreestantes.blogspot.co.uk 5
http://entreestantes.blogspot.com.ar 5
http://entreestantes.blogspot.nl 4
https://lerebooks.wordpress.com 4
http://theantiquarianlibrarian.blogspot.com 4
http://entreestantes.blogspot.ch 3
https://twitter.com 2
http://nswnet.net 2
http://apps.synaptive.net 2
http://entreestantes.blogspot.ro 2
http://alfinete2008.blogspot.com.es 2
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 2
http://fever.infoneer.net 2
http://google.com 2
http://entreestantes.blogspot.ca 1
http://www.diffbot.com&_=1360932672961 HTTP 1
http://entreestantes.blogspot.fi 1
http://entreestantes.blogspot.sg 1
http://entreestantes.blogspot.jp 1
http://news.google.com 1
http://bpl-teen-programming.wikispaces.com 1
http://alfinete2008.blogspot.com.br 1
http://alfinete2008.blogspot.ru 1
http://entreestantes.blogspot.be 1
More...

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Thanks for joining me today for the first of our 2 part webinar on eBooks. number of attendees today from a variety of libraries. Before we get started, I have a couple of questions to ask you so that we all have a better idea of who is on the webinar.Dan, please post the poll questions. Throughout the webinar I encourage you to ask questions via the chat window, comment, and have conversations amongst yourselves through the chat. I know a lot about ebooks, but I don’t know everything and find it extremely difficult to keep up on all the latest news since this industry is changing so quickly. I will share what I know and hope that you will share your knowledge and experience with others via chat or twitter as well. Disclaimer – my presentation is up-to-date as of today, but things might change tomorrow!You don’t have to buy ebooks. You may be opposed to it due to the multitude of restrictions and that is fine. My purpose here today is to educate you about options, opportunities, and challenges.I have enough content for days, but only have 90 minutes.
  • Today we will focus on purchasing and accessing eBooksTopics include –I’ll stop for questions throughout the discussion today.
  • Some of the reasons people may prefer ebooks include- 24/7 access anywhere, convenience of downloading content on the run or carrying hundreds of titles on one small device. Others like the built in dictionaries, highlighting/note taking, narration or interactive features. Some like the fact they can find free ebooks online or borrow ebooks at no cost from their library. In an educational setting, having multiple users access the same title is beneficial.
  • It’s getting more and more difficult these days to define exactly what constitutes an ebook. Some of them are simple PDF replications of print. Others are free flowing text such as ePub with or without grahics. Some eBooks are in a proprietary format and can only be used on certain devices or with certain software. Many ebooks contain interactive features like audio, video, images, games, and hyperlinks. Textbooks are being developed in digital format and many of these contain supplementary materials and assessment. eBook Apps make up a large portion of the app stores these days. You can find thousands of individual titles enclosed inside one app. Audio books are another type of electronic book. The list goes on and on and will continue to develop.
  • For the last three years, Library Journal/SLJ has conducted surveys of school, public and academic libraries regarding ebooks. Data showed that 33 – 44 percent of school libraries reported offering ebooks. Public libraries ranged from 72 – 89 % in the same time period.
  • When you purchase eBooks one of the most important things to realize is that you are not just buying content.
  • Instead, you are buying content in a container. In addition to the text, images, charts and graphs, you are paying for software and an interface in order to interact with the content. You will have to choose a business model which will determine your access to the content. You will sign a license agreement which will indicate the terms under which you may use the content. Much of this will be governed by DRM – digital rights management.You are buying content, software, licenses, DRM, and an ongoing relationship with a vendor.
  • When librarians ask me for advice about purchasing eBooks I always ask them what their goals are. For example, do they want to build a comprehensive research collection or would they rather pay for access. Some libraries prefer to build, others would rather spend their money by accessing more content for shorter periods of time, and others will want some combination of the two.Whatever route you choose, you have options.
  • Often, the content you want will automatically determine the vendor, business model, license, and format that you will get. This is particularly true with US public libraries, who have limited choices for purchasing best-selling fiction.
  • I’d like to discuss some of the ebook business models in use in the US, focusing on several that may be unfamiliar to you.
  • Short Term Loan is also a growing business model in US Academic Libraries.This model works the same way as PDA, except when it comes time to purchase the title.Instead of triggering a purchase of a title, a library can establish with the vendor a short term loan, or pay per use model.The library will pay a smaller fee to use the book for this one patron for a designated amount of time – 1 day, 30 days, etc. For instance, if the book in question costs $100 list price, a short term loan for 3 days may cost $15.00. So, if your library only uses this book one time and you pay $15.00 instead of $100, you’ve saved money. You are buying access only, not buying content. You own nothing. You have no right to the content after the transaction. However, you can establish a purchase threshold. If the same title is loaned 3 or 4 times, you can choose to buy it at the 3rd or 4th use instead of loaning it again. Some US libraries are using short-term loans instead of Interlibrary Loan services because the costs may be less. Libraries who are using STL are finding they can provide access to more content for the same cost.
  • Internet Archive - They want to buy all the ebooks they can, scan the older books into ebook format, lend ebooks, and use open formats. They have 2 million classic ebooks available and 10 million downloads per month since 2005.  150,000 modern ebooks scanned for the print-disabled since 2010. In-library lending program launched in 2011.  Lending in copyright materials through 150 libraries.  They put 100,000 books into the program from pre-2000. They are trying to buy the rights for 2000 forward, but are having difficulty. The program delivers ebooks from inside or outside the library, checked out to one user at a time. Access via openlibrary or load the catalog records into local catalog.  Joining is easy – contribute at least 1 book to the co-op and submit IP addresses.  Robert nearly had us chanting, “If you own a copy, you can loan a copy.”
  • Open LibraryToday, the Internet Archive announced that the 1,000th library from 6 countries has joined its In-Library eBook Lending Program. Led by the Internet Archive, patrons may borrow eBooks from a new, cooperative 100,000+ eBook lending collection of mostly 20th century books on OpenLibrary.org, a site where it’s already possible to read over 1 million eBooks without restriction. During a library visit, patrons with an OpenLibrary.org account can borrow any of these lendable eBooks using laptops, reading devices or library computers. This new twist on the traditional lending model could increase eBook use and revenue for publishers.Did I mention that it’s currently 100% free for your library to participate in the Lending Library?  All you have to do is send at least one paper book to the IA for digitization.  Users can access the entire collection in-library or from home with remote access, as long as you set up authentication on your end through EZ Proxy, WAM, etc.  Books are added two primary ways: they are scanned in from discarded copies sent to the IA from member libraries -or- IA has arranged a lending agreement directly with the publishers.  Books do operate on a one-user/one-copy model, in keeping with copyright holder rights.
  • Open access for ebooks is becoming more popular. Here I will discuss three services that support open access content for monographs.
  • OAPEN (Open Access Publishing in European Networks) is a collaborative initiative to develop and implement a sustainable Open Access publication model for academic books in the Humanities and Social Sciences. The OAPEN Library aims to improve the visibility and usability of high quality academic research by aggregating peer reviewed Open Access publications from across Europe.OAPEN offers publishers, research institutes and libraries effective new ways of disseminating scholarly work. We have developed a new publishing model to help you finance and produce monographs in Open Access and, most importantly, we have founded the OAPEN Library, a publishing platform designed to give global impact to peer-reviewed research from across Europe. Our members have digital publishing programmes, make use of digital repositories, publish in different European languages, command a worldwide distribution network (including the US), and work closely with university libraries. All titles available through the OAPEN Library have been subject to a stringent peer-review process.To support OA scholarly publishing and to build up our membership base, we have developed a variety of vital services, including a production centre to produce and maintain e-books, and the digital OAPEN Library which provides free and unrestricted access to a growing collection of peer-reviewed titles. OAPEN enables Libraries and Aggregators to use the metadata of all available titles of the OAPEN Library.
  • The Directory of Open Access Books is a service of OAPEN Foundation. The primary aim of DOAB is to increase discoverability of Open Access books. Academic publishers are invited to provide metadata of their Open Access books to DOAB. The directory will be open to all publishers who publish academic, peer reviewed books in Open Access and should contain as many books as possible, provided that these publications are in Open Access and meet academic standards. The current requirements to take part in DOAB are twofold: Academic books in DOAB shall be available under an Open Access license (such as a Creative Commons license) Academic books in DOAB shall be subjected to independent and external peer review prior to publication What is the difference in content of the OAPEN Library and DOAB?The OAPEN Library contains the full text of peer reviewed OA books; DOAB contains a description of OA books. This means that you can search both the contents and the description of the books in the OAPEN Library, and you can download the book directly. DOAB enables you to search the description of the books and enables you to download the books from the site of the publisher.What is the difference in licenses in the OAPEN Library and DOAB?The collection in the OAPEN Library contains books that are ‘free to read’ and books that are ‘free to share’. All books in DOAB have a full OA license, making them ‘free to share’. The books in the OAPEN Library that are only ‘free to read’ are not listed in DOAB.
  • Unglue.it is a new company launched by Eric Hellman. Eric blogs at Go To Hellman. Eric supports the open access business model for e-books. Gluejar is building a place for individuals and institutions to join together to liberate specific ebooks and other types of digital content by paying rightsholders to relicense their works under Creative Commons licenses.Unglue.it offers a win-win solution: Crowdfunding. We run pledge campaigns for books; you chip in. When, together, we've reached the goal, we'll reward the book's creators and issue an unglued ebook.Creative Commons licensing means everyone, everywhere can read and share the unglued book — freely and legally. You've given your favorite book to the worldBooks that are out of print, not available as ebooks, or otherwise hard to enjoy will be available for everyone to read, share, learn from, and love -- freely and legally.Unglue.it dedicated to licensing works to the public commons, not publishing them or owning rights. We work for books that have been published in other ways. We are NOT a publisher ourselves.
  • The ProblemSpecialist books in the Humanities and Social Sciences (including but not exclusively monographs) are under threat due to spiralling prices and reduced library funds. While academics could choose to bypass existing publishers and just post content on the Web, the general consensus within academia is that they would prefer to have their books professionally published. Only a few hundred copies make it into the eight to twelve thousand research universities, and very few teaching universities have access to these materials.A Possible SolutionCover the costs of creating the first digital copy through a library consortium and make the titles open access. Publishers would continue to generate additional revenues from the sale of print, ePub and PDFs in bespoke formats. The concept is of a two-sided approach by publishers and libraries to offer and buy Open Access scholarly specialist books (sometimes referred to as monographs, but not restricted solely to this genre). The model is conceptually simple, but would requires considerable stakeholder buy-in.The principle is one of aggregation. Libraries, via a consortium, would aggregate orders and offer to pay publishers an amount that covers the publishers’ fixed costs (or otherwise expressed, ‘getting to first copy costs’). This would include the traditional work of publisher selection, peer review, editing, formatting, design and overhead costs. Works would be published online on a creative commons non-commercial license, and publishers would retain the right to sell print versions, bespoke ebooks, enhanced ebooks etc. Unlike OA Gold for journals, this model would not rely on research funding bodies to pay publication fees as doing so would exclude much unfunded research and writing in the Humanities and ocial Sciences. This model simply uses existing library book purchasing budgets more efficiently and effectively. However, it does not preclude funding body engagement, which would be especially helpful during the start-up phase.Benefits for publishers – assurance that no monograph under this scheme makes a loss and affords opportunities to build further on the core content;.For libraries – content is acquired at a greatly reduced cost. For authors – discoverability and visibility worldwide. For readers and researchers – free at point of use with the opportunity to purchase in different formats.
  • Mary Minow – E-book buying vs. licensing, Layers of control - Physical, copyright, licenses/agreements, and encryption/DRM, and the DMCA.  The physical layer of control was chains on books, 2nd layer was the publishers wanting control and thus copyright was born, licenses cover the vendors, DRM protects digital copies and the DMCA makes it illegal to “pick locks on digital content”.  DRM is a digital restrictions management that has nothing to do with copyright.The purpose of copyright law is to expand knowledge.Copyright on published works – life of author plus 70 years.Section 108g of the copyright law allows libraries to do ILL.Libraries are still subject to the copyright restrictions on ebooks.  They can’t make copies, etc.What is first sale?  Important for our existence.  Allows us to loan books and sell used books.  This is in the US, but don’t take it for granted b/c it’s not the same in other countries.  Some libraries in other countries have to pay royalties on the times a book is checked out.Fair use argument to allow library loans – 4 factors in the law.  purpose, nature, amount, and market effect.Copyright only protects the publisher and author, not the vendor, so vendors need a license agreement.  The license agreement negates copyright, so technically we start with ILL, the license agreement takes it away.  So, don’t sign license agreements that take it away.Removing DRM is easy to do, but should you/can you do it?  DMCA of 1998 made it a crime to “pick the lock” and remove the DRM.  DMCA is a law that criminalizes tampering with digital locks.  But, there are some exceptions, but they are very narrow and revised every 3 years.  July 2010 – added ebook controls on read-aloud functions when all existing editions block accessibility.  Cell phone apps interoperability."... (i)n the event of termination, DLR [OverDrive] will cooperate with the Consortium to transfer any and all Digital Products and content purchased from DLR or independently owned by Consortium to another service provider to permit Library to continue to serve its Patrons with Digital Products. For Digital Products that Consortium has purchased from DLR, Consortium shall obtain permissions and consent from the owners of the Digital Product authorizing DLR to transfer the Content.“But what does bother me about the Kindle’s DRM is the fact that once you download a book, it is permanently bound to your Kindle account. The new Kindle lets you share the content if you own multiple units and Amazon says it will make Kindle content available on other devices. But what you cannot do is sell, trade, or give away the book when you are done with it. U.S. copyright law is grounded in something called the first-sale doctrine. First sale means that when you purchase a protected work, you own it outright and are allowed to dispose of it any way you want. In fact, you can do just about anything you please with it except duplicate it. Kindle’s DRM takes away my first-sale rights. The same can be said about the DRMs that protect downloaded music (where DRM seems to be dying), videos, and games. But those don’t have the same emotional effect on me that DRMed books do, probably because the trade in used books has been an important part of our culture in the way that selling used audio or video recordings has not. Our culture would certainly be much poorer without Powell’s Books in Portland, Ore., or Witherspoon Books in Princeton, N.J., or Manhattan’s Strand Bookstore.It seems to me that there should be a simple solution to this problem. With all of its technology, Amazon should be able to find a way that I could transfer a Kindle book from my account to someone else’s.
  • Mary Minow – E-book buying vs. licensing, Layers of control - Physical, copyright, licenses/agreements, and encryption/DRM, and the DMCA.  The physical layer of control was chains on books, 2nd layer was the publishers wanting control and thus copyright was born, licenses cover the vendors, DRM protects digital copies and the DMCA makes it illegal to “pick locks on digital content”.  DRM is a digital restrictions management that has nothing to do with copyright.The purpose of copyright law is to expand knowledge.Copyright on published works – life of author plus 70 years.Section 108g of the copyright law allows libraries to do ILL.Libraries are still subject to the copyright restrictions on ebooks.  They can’t make copies, etc.What is first sale?  Important for our existence.  Allows us to loan books and sell used books.  This is in the US, but don’t take it for granted b/c it’s not the same in other countries.  Some libraries in other countries have to pay royalties on the times a book is checked out.Fair use argument to allow library loans – 4 factors in the law.  purpose, nature, amount, and market effect.Copyright only protects the publisher and author, not the vendor, so vendors need a license agreement.  The license agreement negates copyright, so technically we start with ILL, the license agreement takes it away.  So, don’t sign license agreements that take it away.Removing DRM is easy to do, but should you/can you do it?  DMCA of 1998 made it a crime to “pick the lock” and remove the DRM.  DMCA is a law that criminalizes tampering with digital locks.  But, there are some exceptions, but they are very narrow and revised every 3 years.  July 2010 – added ebook controls on read-aloud functions when all existing editions block accessibility.  Cell phone apps interoperability."... (i)n the event of termination, DLR [OverDrive] will cooperate with the Consortium to transfer any and all Digital Products and content purchased from DLR or independently owned by Consortium to another service provider to permit Library to continue to serve its Patrons with Digital Products. For Digital Products that Consortium has purchased from DLR, Consortium shall obtain permissions and consent from the owners of the Digital Product authorizing DLR to transfer the Content."
  • KindleUpon your download of Digital Content and payment of any applicable fees (including applicable taxes), the Content Provider grants you a non-exclusive right to view, use, and display such Digital Content an unlimited number of time…solely on the Kindle or a Reading Application or as otherwise permitted as part of the Service, solely on the number of Kindles or Other Devices specified in the Kindle Store, and solely for your personal, non-commercial use. Digital Content is licensed, not sold, to you by the Content Provider. The Content Provider may include additional terms for use within its Digital Content. Those terms will also apply, but this Agreement will govern in the event of a conflict. Some Digital Content, such as Periodicals, may not be available to you through Reading Applications.
  • Pottermore12.3 You may not and may not permit others to do any of the following things in relation to any book or extract:§ sell, distribute, loan, share, give or lend the book or extract to any other person including to your friends (except in the limited circumstances explained at 12.1 above);
  • Publishers vs. Aggregators – which is best for you?Public libraries – not much choice in the matter since most trade publishers will not sell direct, you’re stuck with the aggregator. Plus, multiple publishers means multiple contracts with a city/county governmentBenefits of buying from Publishers:they provide content directly – have content that is NOT sent to aggregators and overall a more stable title listsingle platform built to enhance the content offered and sometimes integrate the search with journal content of the same publisherPricing – no aggregator/middle man to take a cut, opportunities for greater negotiation on price
  • Purchasing from publishers does have negative implications as well. Each publisher will require a license agreement, so there will be multiple ones to negotiate and track through the processlicense agreements needed for each publisher, which isn’t cost effective for librariesLots of work with electronic licensing, ERMs, and tracking of links, etc. If you purchase from 5 different publishers, you will have 5 different user interfaces. More instruction, tutorials, differences in printing/downloading limits, etc. As I mentioned earlier, publishers of trade titles are highly unlikely to sell direct to libraries. So this doesn’t offer options for libraries who want downloadable fiction titles. Many publishers are moving their traditional books (monographs and A to Z reference) to databases. This type of material is highly unlikely to be sent to aggregators and will come with a variety of biz models – subscribe, perpetual access, etc. (examples include SRMO, OUP’s OBO and the berg fashion encyclopedia, etc) This will make the use of discovery tools so much more critical
  • Benefits of Aggregators:They serve as mediators for content so in one platform, you can have multiple publisher content that is cross searchableThis helps to improve the visibility of smaller publishers, who if purchased from publisher, may be hidden on the library site.One license to negotiateIntegrated into distribution systems and approval plans, for example if you use YBP, the gobi system offers to option to buy the book from several aggregators (overdrive excluded here, they have their own ordering system)Ingram, overdrive, and others also have robust systems for libraries to purchase content, track use, etc. Many aggregators offer collection development assistance in the way of customized collections, subject collections, etc. Two of the major aggregators – ebrary and ebooks on EBSCOhost, are owned by companies who have large scale discovery systems. Assuming these companies index their ebook content in the discovery index, this will add to greater discovery of content.
  • Not all publisher content is available via the aggregator, publishers do hold back more popular titlesSome titles are sold via the publisher first, then are sent to the aggregator, so there are delays in release or embargoesPricing/licensing is established by contracts with the publishers, and there is not much room for negotiation. Anytime an aggregator wants to adapt a biz model, or anything that has to do with DRM (printing, downloading), the publisher contracts need to be updated. Some publishers are concerned about loss of revenue due to large consortia buying fewer titles. As a result, some are limiting the size of the consortia. Another example is with OverDrive – they used to have the statewide consortia plans where public and academic libraries could purchase titles. OverDrive now excludes academics from joining these public consortia groups. Several public librarians have told me that the ongoing access fees for OverDrive are very steep and it is difficult for smaller libraries to pay these fees. Aggregators don’t own the content, the publishers do, so if something should happen to them, what happens to your content? We’ve experienced this scare twice now with the sale/purchase of NetLibrary. We’ll discuss this again later in the webinar.
  • Throughout the rest of the presentation, I’ll be referring to a number of ebook aggregator companies when I discuss biz models, etc. The ones I will focus on are:EBL – academic aggregator, heavy on STEMM, internationalOverDrive – industry leader for public library downloadable contenteBooks on EBSCOhost – AKA netlibrary. I’ll refer to them as EBSCO because after July 1st this will be the new name and the netlibrary name and interface will be dropped. Titles will be accessible on the EBSCOhost interfaceIngram Digital/MyiLibrary – academic content as well as downloadable ebooks and audiobooksEbrary – variety of content for academics and publics, proprietary interface, no downloading at this time, but other interesting features like the interface can be purchased so libraries can add their own content using the DASH service – upload PDFs
  • Throughout the rest of the presentation, I’ll be referring to a number of ebook aggregator companies when I discuss biz models, etc. The ones I will focus on are:EBL – academic aggregator, heavy on STEMM, internationalOverDrive – industry leader for public library downloadable contenteBooks on EBSCOhost – AKA netlibrary. I’ll refer to them as EBSCO because after July 1st this will be the new name and the netlibrary name and interface will be dropped. Titles will be accessible on the EBSCOhost interfaceIngram Digital/MyiLibrary – academic content as well as downloadable ebooks and audiobooksEbrary – variety of content for academics and publics, proprietary interface, no downloading at this time, but other interesting features like the interface can be purchased so libraries can add their own content using the DASH service – upload PDFs
  • Throughout the rest of the presentation, I’ll be referring to a number of ebook aggregator companies when I discuss biz models, etc. The ones I will focus on are:EBL – academic aggregator, heavy on STEMM, internationalOverDrive – industry leader for public library downloadable contenteBooks on EBSCOhost – AKA netlibrary. I’ll refer to them as EBSCO because after July 1st this will be the new name and the netlibrary name and interface will be dropped. Titles will be accessible on the EBSCOhost interfaceIngram Digital/MyiLibrary – academic content as well as downloadable ebooks and audiobooksEbrary – variety of content for academics and publics, proprietary interface, no downloading at this time, but other interesting features like the interface can be purchased so libraries can add their own content using the DASH service – upload PDFs
  • Throughout the rest of the presentation, I’ll be referring to a number of ebook aggregator companies when I discuss biz models, etc. The ones I will focus on are:EBL – academic aggregator, heavy on STEMM, internationalOverDrive – industry leader for public library downloadable contenteBooks on EBSCOhost – AKA netlibrary. I’ll refer to them as EBSCO because after July 1st this will be the new name and the netlibrary name and interface will be dropped. Titles will be accessible on the EBSCOhost interfaceIngram Digital/MyiLibrary – academic content as well as downloadable ebooks and audiobooksEbrary – variety of content for academics and publics, proprietary interface, no downloading at this time, but other interesting features like the interface can be purchased so libraries can add their own content using the DASH service – upload PDFs
  • OUP – XML based, First phase of content from participating partner presses include Fordham University Press (Fordham Scholarship Online/FSO); The American University in Cairo Press (Cairo Scholarship Online/CSO); The University Press of Kentucky (Kentucky Scholarship Online/KSO); University Press of Florida (Florida Scholarship Online/FLASO); Hong Kong University Press (Hong Kong Scholarship Online/HKSO); Additional presses are signing up to participate and OUP expects to add their content to UPSO in March 2012.  Edinburgh University Press (Edinburgh Scholarship Online/ESO) and Policy Press (Policy Press Scholarship Online/PPSO) are just two additional presses slated for the March 2012 update.Two major university press e-book initiatives –Project MUSE Editions (PME) and the University Press e-book Consortium (UPeC) — have joinedforces. The result of this merger — the University Press Content Consortium (UPCC) — will launch January 1, 2012.The partnership allows e-books from an anticipated 60-70 university presses and non-profit scholarly presses — representing as many as30,000 frontlist and backlist titles — to be discovered and searched in an integrated environment with content from nearly 500 journalscurrently on MUSE.Five of the nation’s leading university presses – Chicago, Minnesota, North Carolina, Princeton, and Yale – are at the forefront of a new effort to publish scholarly books online as part of the non-profit service JSTOR.  Their books, representing ground-breaking scholarship across the humanistic, social, and scientific disciplines, are expected to be available in 2012.
  • As e-books emerged in libraries, traditional print wholesalers were not equip to handle digital transactions because their systems were based on a print model. Innovations in recent years have opened the market for wholesalers to offer e-books. Purchasing through a wholesaler allows libraries more flexibility to purchase single or multiple e-book titles from numerous publishers or aggregators. Wholesalers are similar to aggregators because they negotiate the licenses, track billing, ordering, and shipping (for print titles). But they differ in that most do not have an e-book interface. Many wholesalers will sell access to e-books from multiple aggregators. For example, Yankee Book Peddler offers e-book content from ebrary, EBL, and eBooks on EBSCOhost. Wholesalers also offer approval plans for print or electronic books. Libraries can choose to have an “e-preferred” status in the approval plan 
  • Wholesalers are also similar to aggregators in the challenges they present with e-books. They can only sell content made available by publishers. Additionally, price negotiations are not as flexible because two parties are now seeking revenues from the same sale.
  • Blio reader was developed by Ray Kurzweil and is offered by Baker and Taylor. It’s currently only available for the PC, with MAC and iOS versions promised soon. It’s a consumer based app that offers full color, audio, read along features, and a variety of other tools. Baker and Taylor – Baker and Taylor, through their new Axis 360 digital media library and blioereading software also offer ebooks. Libraries can order over 105,000 ebook titles using Baker & Taylor’s Title Source. Circulation of ebooks takes place using the Axis 360 digital media library with cloud based delivery of content. Finally, the blio reader is used to consume and interact with the content. The blio reader specializes in full-color content, interactivity, and accessible features. Ebook programs start for as little as $500 per year. This low cost of entry allows for an individual library to have a personalized collection for their community. Patrons need not compete for title availability within a larger consortia. In spring of 2012, they will offer EPUB and PDF files available for download to devices. The Axis 360 mobile site was launched. The "magic wall" is now rendered for mobile with a carousel display.  Many new browse functions/categories are available on this new mobile site to help users drill down to the content better.  Michael Bills, Director of Sales, Digital Products, says they may adopt this on the full site.Full testing of ebooks sales from Hachette and Penguin publishers will be announced soon.  Penguin pilot projects have been in place in two library systems since late 2012.APIs were released to ILS companies, discovery services, and mobile apps.  These APIs provide real time inventory, checkouts, and holds.   A second set of APIs will be released soon.  These will track the circulation stats on print and electronic books in one place.  SirsiDynix, III, TLC, and Polaris will all roll out with these in the next couple of months.  Bibiocom, Boopsie, and VuFind will follow.Patron's can now see the rank of their hold to determine where they are on the list. The patron's wish list will also be viewable in the catalog (once the APIs are fully functional).B&T offers about 413,000 ebook titles and 25,000 audiobooks from 297 publishers.  The blio and BlueFire reader apps can be used to read the B&T content on devices.  Direct downloads in PDF and EPUB formats are also available.  Audiobook content is available via Acoustik audiobooks via the Acoustik app.  The app can be downloaded with sample content.
  • OverDrive - OverDrive, the largest public library ebook vendor, offers over 700,000 titles from 1000 publishers. Ebooks, audiobooks and videos are available in a variety of fiction and non-fiction genres. OverDrive is the only library vendor at this time to offer direct download to Kindle devices. Titles are leased, and do not include annual maintenance and hosting fees. Libraries with limited budgets are strongly encouraged to create larger purchasing groups like the West Texas Digital Consortia (http://ow.ly/9P3fj). Another option is to join a pre-existing statewide consortia. These are open to new members in most states. New members must be public libraries, be new to OverDrive, and serve a population of less than 100,000. Libraries in the consortia will pay annual participation fees. Current participation fees cover content as well as hosting and maintenance costs. OverDrive has a huge array of new services. The first is the new digital library website redesign.  This is in place in several libraries right now.  See it live at Cleveland Public Library or Cuyahoga County Public Library.  The library website was redesigned for ease of use, and now includes One-Step Checkout, in addition to a number of other improvements to simplify and speed up the user experience.  One of these is an assortment of new facets for filtering content.OverDrive APIs are now available for a variety of ILS companies - Biblionics, Sirsi, TLC.   The current APIs available (and that have been integrated into various library OPACs) are Search, Metadata and Availability.  The APIs allow real time searching of the OverDrive catalog via one's library catalog.  It shows the number of titles available for checkout.  Soon, more APIs will be released to include checkout and hold features within the catalog. More info is available at developer.overdrive.com.Audiobook and video streaming was announced just before the conference.  These will work on any device with a modern web browser and an active internet connection (must be connected to enjoy).OverDrive Media Stations are now available in a pilot program.  These provide a visual display digital content in the physical library.  The service is compatible with a touchscreen monitor or existing library workstations and devices.  The primary role is discovery and sampling of content, checkout and downloads are not available from the service at this time.OverDrive Read is browser-based, and also is designed for ease of use.  It works in any modern browser for online or offline reading.  This new feature enables in-library and in-school reading of OverDrive content. Content is placed in the cache of the browser to allow for offline reading within one's browser.  No DRM activation, software installations, or personal devices needed.  This service allows one to read content using their existing desktop or laptop computer.OverDrive advantage allows libraries the best of both worlds:  belong to a shared collection and also have a custom collection just for their community (e.g., additional copies of popular titles, or other titles not in the shared collection).  Titles purchased through the advantage program are for use by the local library only, giving the user community a larger selection of content.OverDrive Test Drive is a program to allow libraries to lend devices, or provide training (or both), that are compatible with the libraries' OverDrive eBook service.  Libraries must enroll in the program (free).  They receive device recommendations, promotional materials, best practices ad guidelines to support the device lending program.  Libraries must provide their own devices of course, but the program offers assistance in developing an eBook device lending program that doesn't involve purchasing titles for preloading.  The devices recommended in the OTD program allow patrons to borrow a device, browse the library's digital collection, borrow, read, and return.  Devices for low-vision accessibility are also recommended in the program.   More information is available at www.overdrive.com/testdrive 
  • 3M Cloud Library – 3M launched its cloud library in June of 2011. They currently offer 100,000 ebook titles (other formats will be forthcoming) from 40 publishers. Small public libraries in a consortial group can be easily accommodated by the 3M service. They also have pricing terms for small libraries who wish to remain independent. What makes 3M unique is their year by year commitment with ownership of content. They also offer cloud delivery of content. The company is engaged in discussions with Amazon and hopes to offer downloads to Kindle devices in the future3M now has 300,000 ebook titles and over 1,000 customers.  They are currently the only vendor to offer all customers access to Penguin titles (about 45,000 titles).  These titles have a 6 month embargo.  They are also providing access to Macmillan content.3M is live with ILS integration with Polaris, BiblioCommons,andBoopsie.  III and Sirsi are targeted for March/April 2013.The 3M Content Acquisition Tool (CAT) (launching in April) now provides featured book lists created by Heather McCormack (Former LJ Book Review Editor).  Imagine "if you liked The Hunger Games, try these."  The CAT now offers a save search feature, multiple shopping carts, improved searching capabilities, and eISBN searching as well.3M still provides their own eInkeReader for $149 each.  Libraries can check them out to patrons with no preloaded content.  Patrons can borrow, search for 3M books, read, and return.  The device is easily restored to default settings for the next customer.  3M also provides the 3M  Discovery Terminals, which allow readers to find and check out digital content at the library using a touch interface.
  •  Library Ideas, LLC, more than 500 library systems worldwide that subscribe to its digital products—Freegal Music, Rocket Languages (Library Edition), and Games for Libraries.Freading – Freading is a pay-per use model for libraries. They offer over 20,000 titles from dozens of publishers. After a small start-up fee, libraries pay for content as it is selected and used by patrons. Prices range from $.50 - $2.00 per use, depending on the copyright date of the book. Content is never owned and may not be downloaded a second time without paying the use fee again. On the other hand, this model allows multiple users to read the same title at the same time – no waiting. There are also no ongoing access fees for libraries. Patrons of participating libraries download content through the Freading site using prepaid “tokens” from the library. Libraries can choose the number of tokens available weekly to patronsThe new service, called Freading (free reading) is designed to increase the size and diversity of library ebook collections by allowing them access to a collection of over 20,000 titles without any upfront cost to the library. The business model allows libraries to pay a per-use fee instead of a purchasing an item of unknown desirability—libraries are charged for each download with the cost related to the age of the book (up to 6 months after print publication, $2 per loan, $.50 per renewal; 7-24 months after print publication $1 per loan, no renewal charge; more than 25 months after print publication $.50 per loan, no renewal charge).Freading charges no platform or access fees, and says it has tools to allow libraries to control their spending over the course of a budget year. Participating publishers and authors will get more of their titles onto library websites and get paid for each transaction.
  • Many of you are members of one or more library consortia. There are obvious benefits of purchasing via a consortia and include:more content for less money, equality and consistencyof content across libraries, and less technical work/licensing if one consortia does the work for multiple libraries. Lending content across multiple libraries.
  • But there are significant challenges with consortialebook pricing which included:publishers don’t necessarily want shared access and as a result are putting some pressure on aggregators to limit the size of consortia or the available biz models for consortiaindividual libraries have different needs and may not want to spend money on titles for the entire consortiaOhioLINK example – antheneum has completely different needs than the NEOUCOM medical library.As a result, individual libraries have less control of the content purchased and of the platform/aggregator purchased. differences in opinion on ebook platform and the user experience of each platformSome consortia are negotiating contracts in a “cafeteria” style. Here consortia members purchase only the titles they want access to, but get a discount because they are purchasing as part of a larger group. Some consortia are investigating the use of approval plans for ebooks, some with the PDA model. These can be very difficult to establish and negotiate, not necessarily between the consortia and the vendor, but between the consortia members. One challenge for negotiations b/t the consortia and vendor is negotiating the multiplier. The multiplier is the number of list price copies a consortia needs to pay for in order for everyone to have unlimited access to the content. For example, the Orbis Cascade Alliance, who is finalizing a contract with EBL for consortial purchasing with STL and PDA, agreed to a multiplier of 5. So, 5 copies of the same title need to be purchased in order for the entire consortia (34 I think) to have access. Finally, in public library systems where books are checked out, larger consortia means the potential for larger queues for popular titles. For libraries who are launching downloadable ebooks as a new service, the queues could be a turn-off for would be patrons.
  • Once you’ve determined which vendors have the content you wish to purchase, the attention then turns to evaluating the vendor.A good rule of thumb is to use an evaluation matrix that contains the important criteria for your library or consortia. I have a sample matrix, from the University of California, Irvine, that I’ll share with you in a moment, the URL is listed here, which allows you to download the spreadsheet. Some important evaluation criteria:Make sure the vendor has the content you needDetermine the available business models and how these will impact your budget and ongoing costsExamine and test the user interface. Make sure you try a variety of searches and attempt to do everything your patrons would do to get access to that content – printing, downloading, copying, pasting, etc. Find out what the DRM restrictions are for these features and test them all. Make sure you know how statistics will be kept, how they are kept, and whether or not they can be integrated into your existing ILS system. An important missing component is the availability to circulation figures that can be downloaded into our ILS system from our Electronic vendors.  This is something that the collection HQ people are suggesting we fight for- or (and this is not likely soon) find an ILS system that actually circulates our e-books for us.  There are  many issues with the latter model-including , probably, having a server on which to mount our e-book collection and.....?Investigate the level of support by using it during your trial period. Ask other libraries about their experience, pose questions on listservs about the company, etc.
  • I’m not sure there is a standard or even a best practice for budgeting for ebooks. To my knowledge, most libraries are not getting increased funds in order to add this new format to their collections, so this generally means that funds must be reallocated from existing print lines in order to purchase the ebooks. With ebooks, you will generally pay the list cost, sometimes higher for unlimited use. This is quite different than 20% discount off list for the print title from a distributor. Ross McLachlan from the Phoenix PL said   PPL spends about 4% on ematerials. Must address the needs of all patrons, some print, some electronic Make certain to weigh the costs of purchasing vs. leasing to guaranteed that the model you choose is sustainable in the long run. Also weigh the cost of e vs. p. Maintaining a print collection has ongoing costs – space, reshelving, staff, etc.Know the annual access fees going in, and again, make sure these are sustainable. Before jumping in head first, I recommend some smaller pilot projects for ebooks.
  • It’s about doing what your community wants and needs. Supporting the children and YA collections as needed by the teachers, curriculum, and demands placed on you by your users. If they want print, buy them print, If the want E, buy them E. It’s not a competition remember, we are going to have the two side by side, in harmony, each being used for the right purpose.
  • http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/01/22/library-services/Library Services in the Digital Age Patrons embrace new technologies – and would welcome more. But many still want printed books to hold their central placeby Kathryn Zickuhr, Lee Rainie and Kristen PurcellIn a national survey of Americans ages 16 and older:80% of Americans say borrowing books is a “very important” service libraries provide.80% say reference librarians are a “very important” service of libraries.77% say free access to computers and the internet is a “very important” service of libraries.
  • When Pew Internet asked the library staff members in an online panel about these services, the three that were most popular were classes on e-borrowing, classes on how to use handheld reading devices, and online “ask a librarian” research services. Many librarians said that their libraries were already offering these resources in various forms, due to demand from their communities.
  • Public priorities for librariesAsked for their thoughts on which services libraries should offer to the public, majorities of Americans are strongly in favor of:Coordinating more closely with local schools: 85% of Americans ages 16 and older say libraries should “definitely” do this.Offering free literacy programs to help young children: 82% of Americans ages 16 and older say libraries should “definitely do” this.Having more comfortable spaces for reading, working, and relaxing: 59% of Americans ages 16 and older say libraries should “definitely do” this.Offering a broader selection of e-books: 53% of Americans ages 16 and older say libraries should “definitely do” this.
  • I love ebooks, I think they have enormous potential for libraries, consumers, publishers, authors, and everyone in the information chain.But, as we’ve discussed today, eBooks are not simple, they bring an assortment of questions, issues, and challenges to the table. It will be important for all libraries to educate themselves about ebooks. Just how do you do that?
  • There are a number of great sources about ebooks. The ones on this list are sources that I follow. The last one is on twitter, and each of the ones listed here also has a twitter feed. I welcome you to follow me on No Shelf Required, a blog I’ve maintained for the last 3 years. share screen, demo NSR – show feeds, articles, interviews, do a search for articles of interest

Purchasing E-Books for your Library Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Purchasing E-booksfor your Library Sue Polanka Wright State No Shelf University Required® Libraries@noshelfrequired
  • 2. Topics of Conversation Why eBooks? Purchasing Basics Licensing, Access, and Business Models Publishers, Aggregators & Wholesalers Downloadable Options Group Purchasing Local Hosting Evaluating Vendors &Budgeting Future thoughts
  • 3. Why eBooks?
  • 4. eBook Benefits
  • 5. What is an eBook today?
  • 6. eBook Penetration School Public Academic100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 2010 2011 2012 Source: Library Journal Survey of Ebook Penetration – 2010-2012
  • 7. Purchasing Basics
  • 8. Rule #1You are not just buying content
  • 9. Content in a Container Software/Interface DRM Biz Model eBook
  • 10. Collection decisions have a directimpact on service delivery eBook vendor user content choice experience
  • 11. Search/DiscoverHighlight Print Vendor InterfaceBookmark Copy/Paste Download
  • 12. Do you want to.. Build Access
  • 13. The content you want determines the vendor, business model, license, and format you will get.
  • 14. Business Models & Access
  • 15. Business Models Free Perpetual Access  Single User (checkout)  Multi User Access or  Unlimited Use build a  Patron Driven collection? Token or limited use Subscriptions Ongoing Fees? Short-term Loan
  • 16. Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA) Guaranteed use of purchased content “approval plan” of ebooks Downloadable aggregators Brief MARC records in catalog use a wish list or request Use triggers purchase (10/10/copy/print) Various trigger/price points Publishers and aggregators offer See also: Patron Driven Acquisitions, DeGruyter, 2011
  • 17. Short Term Loan Based on PDA Use triggers a loan/pay per view Cost determined by list price and time needed Access only - Nothing owned Ability to purchase high use titles Access more content for same cost ILL alternative
  • 18. eBook Access Levels Perpetual Access Subscription Files sent to library Perpetual Access Fees paid up front LocallyPublic Hosted ShortDomain Limits Term On Loan or Circulation Rentals Perpetual Access Perpetual Access Ongoing Fees Open Access No Fees Locally Hosted DRM
  • 19. Free and Open Access Collections
  • 20. Expand your eBook collectionwith free content MARC records In catalog Collections in your list of databases Indexed in discovery tools? Embed search widgets in guides Create an eBook guide
  • 21. Sampling of Free eBook sites DailyLit  Big Universe Free Literature  Book Glutton Google Books  Children’s Books Online HathiTrust  Children’s Literature Bookshelf Many Books  Classic Reader Project Gutenberg  Fiction.us Scribd  International Children’s Digital Library (need account) World Public Library  Magic Keys
  • 22. Free - In Library Lending Internet Archive Hosted on OpenLibrary.org Pool of 200K ebooks 1000+ member libraries 20th Century titles Donate one book to the program to join See eBook Buzz column in ONLINE Magazine, March/April issue http://hdl.handle.net/2374.WSU/6339
  • 23. Open Access eBooks  OAPEN  Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB)  Unglue.it  Knowledge UnlatchedSee also ONLINE SEARCHER, Jan/Feb 2013eBook Buzz column
  • 24. OAPEN - Open Access Publishingin European Networks Humanities/Social Sciences Peer reviewed publications Search full text Free to read/share Metadata available
  • 25. Directory of Open Access Books OAPEN Foundation Increase discovery of open access books 1207 peer-reviewed books - 33 publishers Search description only, no full text Directed to publisher site for download Books are free to share
  • 26. Unglue.it  Work with rights holders  Relicense works under CC  Run a crowdfunding campaign  Reach goal = rights holder paid, book available to all for freeSee also: Eric Hellman’s Open Access chapter in Library Technology Reportsand ONLINE Magazine, eBook Buzz Column, May/June 2012 - http://hdl.handle.net/2374.WSU/6338
  • 27. Knowledge Unlatched Pinter Plan Global Library Consortia Support SS/Humanities Professionally published Cover costs of first copy Open Access/CC License Pilot in 2013 See also: NSR Audio Interview with Frances Pinter, March, 2010 www.libraries.wright.edu/noshelfrequired/interviews
  • 28. Licensing & Copyright
  • 29. Licensing and Copyright Right of First Sale in US US Copyright Law provides for Interlibrary Loan Licenses take away these rights Lease not own Limits on circulation
  • 30. Layers of Control DMCA DRM License Agreements Copyright Physical Adapted from Mary Minow, Library Law Blog: http://bit.ly/pVvxMj
  • 31. Think you own that eBook? …non-exclusive right to view, use, and display such Digital Content an unlimited number of times Digital Content is licensed, not sold, to you by the Content Provider. Text from Kindle Terms of Use
  • 32. When you buy a downloadable book from us,what you are buying is the right to use thatbookin the way we explain below for yourown personal, non-commercial use only Text from Pottermore Terms of Use
  • 33. Libraries don’t own them either Licensed Content “Access licensed content”Nothing contained in the agreement shall be construed as granting the end user any ownership rights in or to the licensed content Text from eBook aggregator license
  • 34. Read the License Agreement!
  • 35. Questions?
  • 36. Purchasing eBooksSee Dispatches from the Field: A Guide to Buying Ebooks http://hdl.handle.net/2374.WSU/5994
  • 37. Buying from Publishers +’s Get content direct More stable title list One platform  Search across content formats  Features enhance content  Target to your audience More room for negotiations
  • 38. Buying from Publishers -’s  Multiple license agreements, one for each publisher  Lots of E-management  Multiple platforms  Not an option for most trade titles
  • 39. Buying from Aggregators +’s Many publishers, one platform One license agreement Integrated into distribution systems and approval plans Discovery Improves visibility of smaller publishers & collections CD services offered
  • 40. Buying from Aggregators -’s Many publishers, one platform  Not all publisher content available One license agreement  Delays in release or embargoes Integrated into distribution systems and approval plans  Pricing/licensing established by publishers, not much room for Discovery negotiation Improves visibility of smaller  Limits on size of consortia? publishers & collections  Minimum purchase CD services offered requirements?
  • 41. EBL Dawson eBooks on Era EBSCOhostKnovel ebrary Books 24x7Safari Ingram MyiLibrary
  • 42. EBL Dawson eBooks on Era EBSCOhostKnovel ebrary Books 24x7Safari Ingram Baker& MyiLibrary Taylor 3M OverDrive Freading
  • 43. EBL Dawson Mackin eBooks on Follett Era EBSCOhostKnovel ebrary Books 24x7Safari Ingram Baker& MyiLibrary Taylor 3M OverDrive Freading
  • 44. EBL Dawson Mackin eBooks on Follett Era EBSCOhostKnovel ebrary GVRL Books Credo 24x7Safari Ingram Baker& MyiLibrary Taylor 3M OverDrive Freading
  • 45. University Press Consortia At least four consortia Books at JSTOR UPCC = Project MUSE and University Press eBook Consortium UPSO – Oxford University Press UPO – Cambridge See also, eBook Buzz column in ONLINE magazine, Jan/Feb 2012 http://hdl.handle.net/2374.WSU/6259
  • 46. Buying from Wholesalers +’s Many publishers or aggregators Single or multiple titles Print or E titles Billing/licensing/shipping Approval plans E-preferred status Single library or consortia
  • 47. Buying from Wholesalers +’s -’s Many publishers or aggregators  Not all publisher content available Single or multiple titles  Delays in release or embargoes Print or E titles Billing/licensing/shipping  Pricing/licensing established by publishers, not much room for Approval plans negotiation E-preferred status Single library or consortia
  • 48. Downloadable eBooks Cover to Cover Reading OptionsSee also: A primer on eBooks for libraries just startingwith downloadable media at http://bit.ly/Iz9jwE
  • 49. Suggested Readings E-Book Media and Communications Toolkit  http://www.ala.org/transforminglibraries/ebooktoolkit EbookBusiness Models: A Scorecard for Public Libraries  ALA Digital Content & Libraries Working Group  www.districtdispatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Ebook_Scorecard.pdf Library Services in the Digital Age  Pew Internet  libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/01/22/library-services/ Library Patrons and Ebook Usage  Library Journal Patron Profiles, v1 n1 (fee based report) A primer on eBooks for libraries just starting with downloadable media  Polanka, Sue, in Library Journal http://bit.ly/Iz9jwE
  • 50. If you want… Largest selection of titles – OverDrive Lowest cost of entry – Baker & Taylor Own/transfer content – 3M Short-term loans – Freading Discovery terminals – OverDrive or 3M Custom eReaders – 3M Titles from Big Six – OverDrive, Baker & Taylor, 3M Integration into ILS - OverDrive, Baker & Taylor, 3M
  • 51. Baker & Taylor + Axis 360 + blio 413,000 ebook titles (25K are audio) Lowest cost of entry Harper-Collins, Random- House, Hachette and Penguin content Acoustik app for audiobooks APIs integrate with ILS Cloud based delivery blioereadersoftware - accessible EPUB/PDF downloads
  • 52. OverDrive One million titles, 2000 publishers Random House, Harper- Collins, Simon and Schuster (20 titles), Macmillan (in March) Ebooks/audiobooks/videos + audio/video streaming Lease with maintenance/hosting fees Format choices + Kindle OverDriveREAD – browser based reading ILS system integration via APIs Media Stations Advantage Program - shared collection + custom local collection
  • 53. 3M Cloud Library 300,000 ebook titles;300 publishers Penguin, Macmillan, Harper-Collins, Random House Purchase with rights to move content Year by year commitment Manage content in the cloud ILS integration eReaders& discovery station Content Acquisition Tool (CAT)
  • 54. Freading 50,000 ebooktitles No Big Six Pay per use, nothing owned $150 start-up fee, no ongoing access fees Simultaneous use of titles via token system $.50 - $2.00 a loan, depending on copyright date Meet high demands at lower cost
  • 55. Group Purchasing
  • 56. Group Purchasing +’s More content, less money Consistency across libraries Share content One license Centralized tech/billing
  • 57. Group Purchasing +’s -’s More content, less money  Publishers don’t necessarily want shared collections Consistency across libraries  Long process Share content  Less control of One license content/platform selection  Negotiating the multiplier Centralized tech/billing  Higher holds ratios  Cafeteria plans
  • 58. Host your own eBooks
  • 59. Locally host eBook content
  • 60. Locally Own/Manage Content +’s Purchase content files direct from publisher or author Control Interface We are the aggregator Self-preservation No DRM - kinda
  • 61. Locally Own/Manage Content +’s -’s Purchase content files  IT/Programming staff direct from publisher or author  Technology/servers Control Interface  We are the vendor We are the aggregator  Upkeep costs Self-preservation  Not all publishers will play No DRM – kinda
  • 62. Suggested Readings All Hat, No Cattle: A Call for Libraries to Transform Before It’s Too Late  Library Journal - http://www.thedigitalshift.com/2012/06/ebooks/all-hat-no-cattle- a-call-for-libraries-to-transform-before-its-too-late/ Trailblazers: Moving the Library Upstream in the Digital Distribution Process  ONLINE magazine - http://hdl.handle.net/2374.WSU/6342 E-voke: Creating the future for library E-Content  http://evoke.cvlsites.org/tag/libraries/
  • 63. Questions?
  • 64. Evaluating and Budgeting
  • 65. Evaluating Vendors Find your content first Business Models available Level of access desired User Interface features DRM/restrictions Statistics/Use Data Support Evaluation Matrix - bit.ly/f0z7UP or bit.ly/mY8Azy
  • 66. Sample Evaluation Matrix Chart courtesy of University of California Irvine Libraries
  • 67. ALA’s Scorecard for Public Libraries Replicate print  Variable Pricing Inclusion of titles  Delayed sales with discounts Transfer content  Premium for immediate Lend indefinitely access Accessibility  In library check-out Integration with ILS  Consortia/ILL restrictions Single User  Enhanced discover Limited Loans  Sales channel http://www.districtdispatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Ebook_Scorecard.pdf
  • 68. Budgeting What is the best practice? Most are reallocate existing print funds List Cost vs. Discount vs. List+ Weigh costs of purchase vs. subscribe Look for sustainable models Short-term Loan vs. ILL Access Fees and ongoing costs? Start with pilot projects
  • 69. Budget Projections Public Libraries Current 4%, projecting12.6% by 2017 Academic Libraries - average Current9.6%, projecting 18.5% by 2017 School libraries - average Current 2-3%, projecting 7% by 2017 Source: Library Journal Survey of eBook Penetration and Use, 2012
  • 70. Budget for what your Community Wants!
  • 71. What about the future?
  • 72. Libraries and Self-Publishing How do we Discover Review Purchase Access Self-published eBooks?
  • 73. Library Services in the Digital Age Pew Internet Research Study, 1/22/2013 Free computers and internet access now rivals book lending and reference expertise as a vital service of libraries. A notable share of Americans say they would embrace even wider uses of technology at libraries.
  • 74. Library staff opinions Pew Internet Research Study, 1/22/2013 Three most popular services are:  Classes on e-borrowing  Classes on handheld reading devices  Online ask a librarian service
  • 75. Public Priorities for Libraries Pew Internet Research Study, 1/22/2013Libraries should “definitely do” this 85% - coordinate more closely with local schools 82% - free literacy programs to help young children 59% - comfortable spaces for reading, working, relaxing 53% - offer a broader selection of e-books
  • 76. Black and Hispanic Communities Pew Internet Research Study, 1/22/2013 Are more likely to use these services: Cell app  Media lab to create e-books, movies Ask a librarian service  Borrow loaded e-book Service to test new readers technology and devices  GPS app to locate materials Classes on downloading e-books  Classes on e-readers Kiosks/red boxes  Customized online recommendations
  • 77. Publishers Platforms Archiving Budgets Patron DrivenDevices Access Consortia eBooks ILL DRM Accessibility Aggregators Formats Libraries Licensing Downloads
  • 78. Keeping Up? No Shelf Required – www.noshelfrequired.com LJ/SLJ ebook blog– www.thedigitalshift.com ALA eContent blog-americanlibrariesmagazine.org/e-content ALA TechSource blog - www.alatechsource.org/blog Teleread– www.teleread.org INFOdocket– www.infodocket.com eBooknewser - www.mediabistro.com/ebooknewser/ The Digital Reader - www.the-digital-reader.com/ Go-to-hellman - go-to-hellman.blogspot.com
  • 79. Questions? sue.polanka@ wright.edu Twitter @noshelfrequired noshelfrequired.com