Osaka – A Different Culture Final

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A short explanation of some of the cultural differences between Osaka and Tokyo by a long-term foreign resident

A short explanation of some of the cultural differences between Osaka and Tokyo by a long-term foreign resident

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Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2.
    • Natsume Soseki
    • “ You know when you’re getting closer to
    • Tokyo because the peoples noses get
    • longer and their faces get pointed.”
  • 3.
    • Botchan was written by a Tokyo author, about a
    • very direct Tokyo character
    • Any differences we identify are tendencies rather
    • Than hard and fast rules.
    • Often differences between company cultures are
    • greater even than national cultural differences
  • 4. Stuttgart Milano Tokyo – 550 km (340 m) Stuttgart – Milano Washington DC – Charleston London – Edinburgh Not surprising there are some differences in style
  • 5. Overspending on: G o o o d food
  • 6. 808 Bridges – they say
  • 7.
    • Northern Europe
    • Bad weather
    • Dull food
    • Rigid rules,
    • Reserved people
    • Orderly parking
    Southern Europe Good weather Great food Flexible Open people Chaotic parking
  • 8.
    • Accent is scary – sounds
    • aggressive
    • Don’t stick to rules/agreements
    • Noisy, impolite, intrusive
  • 9.
    • Homesick - miss the food
    • Hard to meet people - don’t
    • understand me
    • They’re prejudiced against Osakans
  • 10.
    • What difference?
    • Direct and open
    • Why did I learn Japanese?
    • Wakarahen!
  • 11.
    • Targeted – sell good quality at a good
    • price to individuals
    • They will keep the price to
    • themselves so others don’t find the
    • source of their b argains and discover
    • that they are buying cheaply.
    • You can continue to sell at a good
    • price.
  • 12.
    • Volume – Sell quality at a good,
    • But slightly lower price to
    • individuals
    • They tell all their friends about the
    • bargain price and sales take-off
    • quickly.
    • Of course, they’ll try to find out
    • Where you’re buying, so they can
    • buy direct.
    • A City of Merchants!
  • 13.
    • Can be difficult to get into the market – strong personal relationships
    • Negotiation style is tougher
    • Negotiation after deal is signed
  • 14.
    • Flexible thinking – many of the best comedians are from Osaka
    • Not afraid to say what they think
    • Welcoming – once you’re in, people want to help
    • Long history of links with the world – The Manchester of the East
  • 15.
    • Adapt your approach
    • Use the positive points to your advantage
    • If you’re late for the Shinkansen and
    • can’t buy a ticket, in Kanto, you often
    • miss the train.
    • In Osaka, you ask the ticket
    • collector and buy the ticket on the
    • train.
  • 16.
    • End 1996 - visited various cities – Hiroshima, Kobe, Osaka, Nagoya, Yokohama to find a factory location
    • Most dynamic reaction from Osaka City - showed me a number of potential locations
    • When I arrived back in the UK, the Osaka European office called me immediately
    • Osaka-style result – found the first office through personal contacts
  • 17.
    • 1999 – Rented assembly location – normal bargaining over price.
    • Negotiated reduction in estate agency fee – everything is negotiable
    • 2000 – Started assembly – received subsidies from Osaka Pref for workers taken on full-time
    • 2002 – Re-negotiated rental agreement to reduce payments (negotiating after the contract has been signed is not necessarily a bad thing!)
  • 18.
    • 2000 – 2005: Mixed full-time and temporary workforce produced consistently high-quality products
    • Outsourced service providers (Accounts, HR, IT) were effective and loyal
    • Local equipment, component and service suppliers were flexible and supportive
  • 19.
    • Maido arigatou gozaimasu