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William Pawley
 

William Pawley

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Flying Tigers. Was aware of Oswald being OP

Flying Tigers. Was aware of Oswald being OP

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    William Pawley William Pawley Document Transcript

    • - ..........- - - -------- - - ··· -- ··- · --· -- · --·---- · ~ --~ ------..._ -- . ._.. ! ' U:."" l ~ 13 - #4JCE C>F .THE £.,fEDICAL EXAlJINER, Dade County N ~.Mt: ~.l1... _ OF DECEASEO ....Nl.LLll':...M.._PAWLEY 8..,_l9_ TL..._ __ -- - - - CiSE No. rJ.=..£..2__ ___ _ _ _ CAUSE OF DEl1..'fH; Guns hot wo und of ch~st TOXICOLOGICAL l"INDINGS : H•3 art blood: E thanol .:u1d methano l ·-· neg·c>.t: i ve .Aci c: a!i. cl b as i.e sc.:ms -- n c~ga ti 'h~ Group - "A" , ./; ' 0 • 0 ·' /' , .... "",· _,. / ' 1 " ! · ' . I , , .. , , ' / .. ''.. ( • ·!· ,•"~,-' I -., E' L •·u -r -0-~C- --·PP ~N-1~.-Jl~ D1;~-~~;!_ _ .. D ..J.. l. ..4- " ..,_ L..J ~ '"- '<f ._,L_ . o "~ .. .;. . ' / .. •/ • ft... . , Assistant Hedi c a] Exar"i ner ECP : s m _ _ __ _
    • 11 ;!,. u :•-•:~ ' ~ OFFICE OF. THE MEDICAL EXA1v1IN£R, Dade County CTSE No. --::J-7--6-2..-··-- - - - ____ EXTERNAL EXAl"!Il~A'r iON : The body is t hat of a well developed , thin , e l derly Caucasian male tha. ·t appe a rs to be ·t he r ecorded age of 80 . 10 inches and ~eighs I t msasure s 5 f e et 125 pounds . The body is clad in light bl u e p aj a ma pants. There is ful l to moderate rigidity on this b cdy a nd s l ight dependent lividity over th e back portions of the torso and extremities . There is a gunshot wound on this body. The e ntry wound is l o cated on the le ft f ront of t he chest at ~::boulder 8- 3/4 inches belO'Il the top of the t.he anterior midline . c:m d 4 inches to ·J.:he left of Thi r:.; wound is located slightly to t he J.e f t .slightl y a bove the left nipp le . Th <:'! entry <Jound is roush Ly and measures 3/ 4 o f an inch in di a meter. no signi f i c ant gros s change s. .;.,nd ci1~ cular The surroun din q skin ex.h ibi ts The projectile 0nt.ered the ches t cu.vi t y through the J.e ft 4t h in tercos ta.l space an ·i:.:ed.or l y , t. r .:we r sed the l?e.ri card i e:,_ sac , ·the a o :rta, ·the l eft. lnng and e xite d t h e l eft ch e st l cavity through t.h e 9th int.e rcos ta l spac e pes teri o r J. y. o f this woun d is from front t.o b ack, l ef t to r i g h t 'r h e p <i th:vay and sligh t l y d own . The c orresponding ex it wound is loca t ed on th e l e ft ba c k 9 inchGS from the top of the shoulder and 1-1/4 inc h e s to tl1e l eft o.E t h e post.crior midline. Th e exit. vo und i s i r r egular in shape me asuring approx imately .. . 6/16 of an ir.ch i n d i a meter . No p roje ctiles a:r:·e recovered f r om this body . No other ·tr a uma is e lici ted Qn 1:he e x a;-nination o f thi s bod:; . . £}~amin ati on o .f the hands r e veals no powder and/or· The h e ad is o f normal c onfi g ur ation . scalp is unre markab l e . gu.~ soi l dep osition . The scalp ha ir is gray . 'fh e iride s et.re g rc:>.y -blue. 'I'he pupils are The
    • . .. .. ". .. ... ... . . . ,._. ______ _ _______.......,.==..=-= -=__ · ·--=- ;_ _ , := :-=:;-=-: . - . ~ ,.....- ' 11J. '.) 1 !! 1 3 ;. fJFFICE OF THE MEDICAL EXAMINER, Dade County ._ _ equaLLy dilated a nd round. ,he faGial featur·es are r1 'I'he ocu l.ar c onjunctivae is somewhat pale . symmetrical and unremarkable. permanent teeth w:Lth ex·t.ensive in the lower arcus . _ _ CASE No . _2..7.=..6.2_._ . m~:!tal 'I'he mouth contains dental work and some t ee th wissing The ears, nose and t hroat are grossly . un r e ro~ rkab l e. The neck and chest are o i:herwise g ros s ly unremarkable. Hos9ital associated trauma is represented by a l eft trans vers e ante r io r thoracotomy incision that course s through the entry o ri fice Th e and by l e ft subclavian and right antecubital venep unc tures . abdomen shows the presence of one midli ne supra a nd infranmbilicaJ. o l d sur g ical scar 5 inches long an d o ne vertical rig h t lowe r quadrant scar 2-1/2 i nches lo n g . sex. 'I'h e ext.erna l genita li a a re norma l f or t his age and The extremiti e s and back a r e gros s l y unremarkable excep t prese nce of a 2 inc h old scar on the dorsum of ~ci1e fo r the righ t h c-.nd . The body is openeJ in th e u s u a l fashi o n. 'rhe peri.cardia l. cavity contains a small amount of b lo0d . h e a rt we ighs 300 gr ams. There is mo dera t ely s~vere rosi s with maximal lumi.nt:-.1 narro,.;ing at 7 0 to 80% . •rne coronary arteri osc l e Se c ·tions > ro ugh tile :h myocardi urn exhibit ext e nsive my ocardial fibro sis invol-v·ing t he poctero-lateral wall of the l eft ventricle. heClrt is gross ly unremarkable. 'l'he rest of the examin a tior. of th2 ·rhe aorta sho ws moderately seve re athe rosclerotic ch ange s a.t'ld a small lace ration in t he lmV"e r p or t ion of t.he thoracic de s cending aort a in relc..t ion v-Ii th t h e g unsho t wo und p r eviously descri be d. The right lung 'YH~ighs 3 80 g rams and t he left lung wei9hs 28 0 grams . The left lung exhibits a throuqh and through lace rat ion cor r es p ond i n g· to the passage of the g unsh o t wound p revious ly that the lun9s exhibi t r. d es~r:~bed . Otl1er than l':'a te pu lmonary e mphysema . 'rhe re is bilate ral ')
    • --OFF1CE OF THE MEDICAL EXAMINER, Dade County NAME OF DECEASED -WU~WLE-Y J~n 8, _ __ _ CASE No. _:r]_.=-CI..l6'-'2_ _ __ _ __ J977 apical pleural fibrosis with a few s mooth line small cavi ties. 'l'he abdominal organs are normally arranged . The liver i s of s li ghtly increased densi ty and a faint gran ular capsu l ar surface . The gallb l adder is present and unremarkable . The spleen , pancreas , adrenals are grossly unremarkable . 'I'he genitourinary tract organs are normal except fo r the presence of fine diffuse granul arity of the renal cortical sur faces and moderately increased prostate . The gas trointestinal tract is grossly unremarkable . The gastric con t ent consists of app roxi mately 60 grams of semisol id partiall y digested food suggestive of cereal . The rem~inder of the examinati on of the abdominal and pelvic cavities is gross l y negative . The neck organ s are examined next and found to be free of gross abnormality. The cranial cavity is opened in the usual f ashion . weighs 1300 grams. The brain The meninges and skull are grossly unremarkable. The brain will be examined in detail after fixation . AUTOPSY FINDINGS: 1. Gunshot wound of chest • •/ ••• •7 ~.·· ' (r ' • /,: ; :/ / . ( ' //r / ,..,__.( ' ,, ..(.. '/ t' I ' t· ( ( /( ( / / '(//; ELIDIO C. FERNANDEZ , M. D. } · ·Assistant Med i cal Examiner ECF: sm 3
    • 1:s :o,•- 13 I ~ .,. bFF1C.E OF THE MEDICAL F.:XA~JINER, Dade County HA.ME or DECE...ISED WI LLIAM PA WLEY Ap r i l 1 , 19 77 CASE l,IJ. 7 -_E _ ) z ____ _ _ _ NEUROPATHOLOGY CONFERENC E Eva Gyo r i , M. D. Th e we ight of th e c e r e bra l lH'! mi s phe r e s and d e ta ch e d rna i n s t2 m and c ere bellum to ge t her is 1 ,2 70 gr am s af t e r f ixa tio n . The ce r ebral h emi spl1 eres are s ynmetr i cnl . The r e i s minima l f ron t a l co n v o l u t ion a l at r op hy. The l eptom enin ges a r e t h i n , trans l u ce nt a nd mo d e rate l y con g e s t e d . The ~ntc~ri c s o f t he c irc l e o f .1!i. l 1 i s s h ow cl. norma l ar r an ge ment . There i s minim a l segmen t al art e r i osc l ero s i s i nvolvin g t he proxima l tr unk of t he mi Jd l e cere br a l a r te ri e s with no ap p rec i a ble na r row ing o f t he v ascu l a r l um e n . Cranial ne r ve roots 5 , 8 and 9 app e aT gross l y no t remar kab 1e. Coronal se ct ions o f th e c er eb-ra. J h emi s p h eres show goo d cor ti cal defi n i tion . The r e is mi l d d i s t e nti on of t he an t eri or hor ns o f th e l a t era l ve nt r icl e s. Th e basa l g a ng lia are pr ese rv e d as we ll a s a r e t he mammill a r y bod i e s . Se c t i ons th ro u gh m.idb Ta .in , po ns, ce r e be l l um an d u pper med ull a s how no r c 111nrkab 1e gro5 s c han ges. IM PRESS I ON : 1. Front al c onv o lu ti ona l atrop hy, mi ld 2. M l d di s t en ti on of a nte rio r ho r ns o f l at e r a l v e ntri c l es i 3. ( f-l"e rp e s op h t hami c us , J on gs t a n d3.ng '?) t; . / (' ' . / lt[ftfti -(t. tt/J.~l(i_..tj/(ft~ i .{ I:J EG : ECF/p l ~L l DIO C. FERNANDEZ , M. D. Ass i s tant M edical Examine r
    • SUBJEer: UNSUB; BOMBING OF CAJl AT 6775 S. W. 27m STREET, MIAMI, J'LORIDA, 10/31/75; ROLANDO IIAS:FDRE~AS - .. .~ VICTUI liD . < • ,t'" ;:. : .:~i·: . , . . -; . . . ·.. . - .... - .. .:- . . : . #J . .. ·:.:. .... . . :-.,..... · :·; .. . . '~: ...... . .. . . .: -:~ ~· · ...... . . ,. .. .... : • ,: .. . ~ ·- . ·.. .• :· . -:" ·: .. : ~. - ..... .:. ~... ;. .-. ;·~::-, :.:-!, .: . aeButel to • ..._.a1 I 11/10''75 ··~ ··.~:·~ ~-· ..._...;.:~~.::r-:·-: ....· :· ,, .._ .... · 'I · - ·.:··.~.· . .. Bnelosed herewith 1s a copy ·of a ·1 etter···aent . .· to lliami .llayor MAURICE :FERRE, pursuant to instructions :_; ·:' · in retel • .... , .. . .. ~ .. :-; • . . t ·- -:~ :_ • '• • =~- ~:- •
    • ·&~-'i 'CLASS. BEA~01~- FCIK !'0 SAC J/IJ.J/I DA'I E OF BE TROL' DIRECTOR1 FBI UliL!ICJ.,/1 SUBJECT . · ~~~~~~~~!~~~DASH YICTIM 1 ZIDNUPI¥0 f!ILLIAI.I PJ.rUI, TORJ/D UNITED BTJ.T&S INTELLIGEiJC& AGENCT P.iREN CU CLOSZ t . t .. . .:_, . ""'-···· 'i;T .. •. ~- - UTBUB PJ.TrOJ/~ DADE COUNTT . _. . .. I• i _ _:.;..;.gt_...:.;.-.:;.r· .· · . · . . .. · :.· .· ' · - .. ·.:- ' ~~B ~~8:~:~;:_,,~~7~1-~~:~ "':&4~~TI0~1 J.DYI~&J) C_J'~. ::·_ :"~ ~A.RJ'I f'OIUl COJJUcr ,Ira . - -~.- . or COJJJII~SICJN~. ,·• l*i7TOX·· ~TArED·· :o66- ~: U~ , .. .' •. . . . ·• # .. I . POLIC~ OFI'ICERB /U.S BEEN OFTERED !YO 6WDRD 'lllOUUIID DOLURs .!T. :..... . 'J!liE . . -· CASTRO TJ KID.'IAP 011'8 Ol'jJU.:JTERBi"B8 PARU BPZr:UU'rED . ROLANDO JIA.SFER/l&R CLOSE PARJJI J'O CUU. ..·. . . . ·. !r CU . r . ·o U · · WM J'Q / MLICZ OTiiCI:B .. I .. . . : ." . . .- ·~ 'c'' i~1 •(
    • .. ··o,t_ I ·' ............ ., .,....... • I I • t, !, . ~ ~.. 1,. •• ~,... of .'· ~ · I • 0 • ., . ~ ,,.. 'Pill•· . . :. ••· -..~ . 'I "'., ... ' .!..""'JI ... "')1''.-Jl f , • ., ""!' '0 ' •• a!.- ?!'J ~ Cc-.. . . . . ~X'Ll':"::L:, J~ c·;:~. J. !!., L~. ,. ,. r --<.·-· . ('I ~ l·u~t. l~~ 0 . • 0 ,' .r-" . . . --=--1 t::.on•l. i i -UU.Q ;;i,.-,...U P~ ~ L·;.;'(_·- 0 0 ~- --------··- --· n. I Q~~ ~ "l.N.N• ~l'e ~'r&d ~ t.bo t>Ono~. I 0 -·.----~-- · -.r 3~ty Ot:i.oe an;! •ro rohn-ed to t-'- ~~1" ot !ioourl~ ~ 5..,.t1oai»cl ~'-:1 .,,.. to 'bo m.ed ~ t.h.d· tua.. o!" ~ cubjeat I . J':l~:.k ;".,!:_-;&A-ll U:.r.~ I J :.~'7'0!, li. f~ :::v z~ . ._, .I ., ;-,, J. • (:,~~ I• 1 . I f I !( . '' .c::::~ .~ • ... . I
    • :' ·~ II~: ·· l. 1~. L,~oy ,~,~--bo_r_n_i n_f_l_l)_!'~:., E~utb Cnrol1o:1, iu 1696. frc:A 19a7 t.o It; I Prellldt:at or lhu: 1on:U Cubi!.'la de A'l1oc1on, Jiavo.'la, Cuba, Jly beu:-e Pruldtot or tbt Cbina llntionfll /lv1ot1oo CorJloroUon ln 1933, and lo 193'+ or~ot~hed CLd bece.c. ~ tee Prclli<!~nt ot tb• Central Aircraft l'~utacturlDJ Co., vbicb pioneered 1o tbe field of r.tTc:r:-!"t t'C~!)t'!"l:tso~ ln Chh:o. __ {~JrtJ Co~pa.oin Lnter he becace Pree1dent ot Bindu•tan Aircraft, Ltd., ~1th bead· at !an33lore, India. Be orsani~ed recruited end c~tntained the Aa•rtr.an Volunteer Croup (Flyio" ~lgera} for tbe Chinese Air Forca. qu~tera In 1945 b~ ':a!) c,t:poictea k;)bas!e.do.- to Peru, C.."l:l .io 19~5 becc.::e A:tb8.3la.!or to Brazil. liis bo::~ ie at 2555 L!Ue Avr!cu~, S•Jo~et l:;la::d /!2, H1a.:U Beacb, ~d be 1:..2..1cta1n• ofticea ot 30 Rcckefellcr Plaz.o, I;ev ~or~ City. "
    • ... ( ( ~' ~_illi~m Pvuglas Pawley --b. Flo:-cncc, 5. C. isr/6; M~rri r.: c! twice; Pres. Compania Nadon<ll Cubana d e Avlacicn·· H.wana, 1927-33; Pres, China Nat•l. Avietion Corp., 1933 ; Pres. (organizer) Central Aircr~ft Mfg. Co,, 1934-38 pioneor building of aircraft factory in China: Pre•. Hindu$tan Aircraft, Ltd., Bangalore, India: Organized, rccruit~d, and ma.intain!d Am.' Volunt~er Croup (Flying Tigers) !or Chin~se Air Forco; 1945-46 Ambaua.dor to Peru~ 1946 Ambassador to Brazil; Home: 2555 Lake Ave., Sunset Island fJ2, Miami Beach; O!Iice: 30 Rockefeller Plaza, N.Y.C •. ) " I .- -J
    • ( I ·' •.... •--I • ..., .. . --t :IIl I I j• II ·' ST. '!'US Subj~ct 1~ a r.~~n of th" Doolittle Con.:U.tt.ee. lntcrlr. Top Zec:nt ch!1~C& ''3S trantud 5ubj~d, b;r 'til~ l~H.-3 lioun on 16 July l15L c!l b~~is of r.~t~ri~ in tba !ilos of the F~cvral n full iii.i.!l"~ · S~ject is tiit7-eit;ht ye~ of age, m.ar:-ied a."ld ·1 14ti7'!! b o:-:r.. S~ject Co:!'.pleted his .toma.l eclucahon at the t~rdon Hilita....-y .Acader.r.r in 1917 and c!l.!l'i.tg Cle naxt. ttle~n years, engQg-ed in 'Varlous ~sC"llht.ive at~d pr~tiooal. b-.:!-in~.n :sche:nes. In t!.:a late 1920's, Subj~ct b?.ca.-:e interoe~ted ill aviation a.od siDce tha't. t.i.':le 1 has pa.rt.!.cipa~d ill the clav-elop:::ent of ttat in~t:"7 iD CU:,a~ CMna aDd l:ld.i.3 -:.;here h'3 bas b9en organi:.er i!nd president 9! ai:cra.!t i'i~. DUring World -l'ar 1I1 Slbject ausisted in the for;;:at!.on o: th'! A.~.e:-ica:1 Voltt::~~r Group {?lyillz Tigers) for ib9 Ch.i!lase .Ah· Po;-~. Si."'lC8 19LS, Su"oj~ct., io acciitiOil to bis r..a.ey business Oj/.l:-atic.n :3 , . r..a.3 b~n ~ctin in t': ~ F.:t)-;ral Se:-rlca. ln l9LS, ht> ~·3 3 A=;:asS<do:- to Pe:-;; a::d fr:1.., 19!!6 to 19l:B, he1d tl':s sa:.d }'lost in E~zil. In 19~8, hs aJ.::;o s~~d /. Crist:"' -to t.~ ~ ~:-cr'!.~.a...J of S"La ~ CJ.v t..'; e t;-~t:d ; ; ::.t.ic::..~ [~;:!:c..:'!. .A:-r-<- :-:.::.1; i• ?a..;-.!s a:::i c-=....-i!lg 1951, he Ha~ S~? cial Ass2.st:a..,t to ·t.:-;3 Sec~ -t ~ ::-:-· c·: !:~.:i:..? A-: .._:-: 'C"".r ~=':':- :=-'..:: :r-.:_-:~~ c~ .t_. . _.:;-;::,. ;~c- :-. . i: ~; ~·.:!"·!r-~~ f"?'-:::1 ~-:-:­ ~=· : .-:-:. :-c· ri "!.:: ~:-1 i:. ~ :: '7 :-::~:~:-, :S.5:-l ! ~ t·~ :· ·::"'~ ~-;-~::..~ : ..:;:-: !~ :...~.... -"':.~ .;. ,. ':) -L:.;. S .:- ~ :- .:-~:-;: c~ I.:c- f J :-.s !'. f.·.:::, j 1: ct p:--t- ==~ r:~l:~· i ~· i! . t1 C."",'-.i ::--e...::: c.! 'lt :-: L-: ..;_-:i t"f t:'l3 I::rt-3:--ccr.tic~.:.~ Cl!!J!v:-zti c::. c:t Sp::ci~ !.::7!:~tirc-. 7.:..:.:: "7~ ; c.:.= :--..: :~~ i.-: ~= cc~ :-- - ~ ' ' ... 1::- c .:.--:-::: '.. ~::-;;..5 ~:-it-·~ C ' ;:-- ::~ ~-=---=~. ! : ~t !t:~:;2 .t:'0-=-=::- c~er::~ ~ ~ · ~:~.~ ·.: ~!' r. ?~; ~i-;-;.- ~.: G~v r;~J C-? J I :I· ~l .If -. I , ··'I ., I I ~' i
    • I I I. ·. .. .. - 2 - .-8MJI!-:
    • ' <?(~/ficc jVfe?nor~trttl'ltnt 1~ TO l >J."Ill ; - ...... ,(j • . l ., 5C11JLC:t : I !r::!:::-.'J~':. {!~ -.. ~~~- O :~ric t: o~· "tb: D :...:· ·:c '~c :- -:;~ Cr- ~.~~:-.::.2 b:t:·l.l:;c!"'C[; ir:::icr. ~~d '.~. ( S~·,t,ii'Ci..l~ c o;,:;~c . i~~ 'l·~ ~~~c­ D:vl!~ ~!~ CQ:~i~"l.~~, the Direc~o~ 0~ s ~c ~-j~y ~ ~~ T~~~e~:~3 ".."h::t 't~e b:.Ui: of th~ jnnstigath!' ::.r.!.c:- i:ol rc:~e:..-ci;;z t:,(! S~.l~j-3ct be .pla.cod iu e.n o·.. ert file. S·.;c~ r.Ateri el is 1. for·. ra:cled bare1.1it'h. The Cffice of the Director of Cer.tral lnt~lligc~ce ~~s ftls~ auvised thet t~c Fe~e~el Bureau of . lnvesti~3tio~ rec~ntly co."?le.,c:l no investi;e.ion of tl':e D'-.J!Jj£c't . ~ to th~ ~e~cran1~ detec 21 lay 1954 conteined in file~ 2. C'l t ~ c! FBI c:ddsecl u s 0:1 30 hp:-il 19;4 th~t its L"l :~o;-r:.c.tlon ~-.-uj ~c 't ~ ..:.d b•:en f~:lh~~d t~ th ~ l.'hi tP. P.o:J!.e !1:1:3 · su;5estej th~t the info~~t1on be ob~~i~ e 1 dL-ectly r.~~ th~ ~·."':. i t ~ Ho~~ -=· l'o~ r;~J Orsir.:· ir:: a't-le '. :> y;y~ · c-f o:-~ 't!':e i I .I I .I ·I
    • - ~ Office .,o ~ · .. Memora~~dttnz ( . · . (· UNJTED STATES GOVE JCNilEl'J'l' I Claief 1 3ocurJ ty Dhic1on I _, I I IUDJI:CT: • 1. 17 :.~arc.:b P.cff!:rcnce 1s n:u!c to :rour l!t!De C'h!:ck Tre.::lS".J!.ttal :1951.. Sh~ ~t c~tcd 2. · On 30 April l95L, n r~pres~n~tive · or the fe~errJ Eureeu of In~c3ti£~tio~ odvis~d th~t the files of the Bureau contains !nfc~ation on Subject which -:-:ils 1lrnish~::! to the iTnit-: HouRe. It ri-a~ su:,t:,es~~! tb.:rt t~~is ir.fornaUon be ob~:dne:l directly fro~ the Tir.ite }iou::;e. .,. ~
    • __.,... ·, · :.:t~ I ··'· '• • . • 4• . l ;::.c~, J~ ~=:~. J. 'i~-r. P?1~ 3., z.t. 7~~~ ! . •• c.c.~• .l. ~ i.SHJm 3iznU L·. ,;(.- ....... - ·------- ----i ·I .. !:ern,. .;:;:rz;-:-....3, ::;. ~:-!..~m._ f. . . ., .. . • • --:~ .. t::. ~»•!»d m-.og~ 1 n:t.u-. 'Ill&" r.on~ b)' tt:. ::~t7 C.lt:1,ue and -.n ~to th. ~...0'1" ~ ~~ ..-b-6 S..,.:H, o-~ ~ -.n. to ·btf t1l8cS i:l tbe 1'Uaa or ':..'. aJbJecrt ~m. ( - ..:..:.:;. s -·· c:. I
    • Gm:at .. .. . I 1 . . , .._..., -:: ' :- _St:3JC:Cl' l r.'.:t~l, . h.lU:t:a toua,lu -the r.ooll S'UTUS . Subj,ct is a cl~:L-ar.ce vas r.~e~'1htlr g:"a."ltf)d o! ~'l;,ject tUe Coc::d t~e. b7 tl:a ·.:11 ~ li oc!e o:o 16 b:1Jis of Nteri.>J. alnadj' :b t!le !ilas o! t. 'le " Inte.rin 'ro-o 56C"nt Julj· l S'5l.t. c:l t..":~ of l::·.~:s ·... :.- Fe~n!. ~u.--ea·J S!hjact is !i!t:;~i~t jaan o! ag~, m..;;.rrled c.:JC. r.a";.!.'7'e b o ~. SU::~ec:. bu !om.al. ed~ation at the C-orc!.o:o Hll.i"U--y Aca~m:r in 1917 &:ld ch:.rill~ ee next. eleven year:s, engai;!d ill 'Val"'io~ s;?Scul..ative a=d prt::IOtic!:!.U blZ3ine:s~ ~cb.e~e . In t~e late 1920':~, Subject b!!c.ar.e intere~t.ad i.:l aviation 8JJd sillce tbat t.i.a:e, ~ par·~ipated in the aa'V'elop-:=ent of ttat i::Cu!s~ iD C~a, China and l:l~.!.a .._hen he h~ b9eJJ orc;;:a_,~ ...~~r a.::d pre:siee:ot of a!:cra::t .tir.:.:s. Dur'....Ilg Worl.C h'~ n, S'"bject assistad in the for:::ati.c~ o! the k:.erlca:1 Vob::1t..er Grct:-p (:ljin6 Tiger::5) ro:- ~e Cbi:lese Air ?o~ . Si;:;c~ 19L5, SU.:,J<!Jct, iD aC.C.:.t.ion to bi.s ~ bu.s~es:s operatior.:., ~ b~r. a:::ti·~ in t!:.:t Fe de ~--::Q Se~ce. I:: l 9L5 , !':2 ;.-;.a J..;:l::as~cDr to Fe:-:: a::.:i ! :-o:-'1 19!:6 t.:J 19~?; !:.elc t.'-:2 ~~ pos-t in !!"!":lill. In l~~·e, b~ also s a~c c..::. Sp?ci;:2. J. C.7is~:"'--:.o -t:.a Se c~tc_ o: S:.z. ~...c G. t "t.~. e t~ ~,:: :;.;:-~-:- =..:: C: ~::~:-_:_ -:: co..'"'lple~ !::.r::--::·1:- :_- .. :=· .~ -:~ a:::. t;=-:~-= ~ 1 9_5:;., ~-~ ~;;:., ~ s;::~c::..: ~. }.~!:!". ~:"':~ :,':" ..._-:~ ~~~ - :-:.--·: -::"' :".::.:...::::;~:: ;". ·-· ~ ::-! !:.;:.= -:. :':'-: ~. ~-.2 :1":: ~ ;:c.!i:.:..:~ i.~ ::c~::= t-;, J..9:·l tc ·:.~~:.=.~ :;.-:: .:. L. :.c~~~:::.'"'...G :..:.~ :...= ~_:-.,.:. ~ :: ::-:?~; c~ !:c~~;-~ @. S ·~· =-:ct J:r~s .;!.-:::.: : s "t~. ~ C~~ - - c·: ~t! ~:,.a,:":! c: -t::.~ bU!r=::n.ii:.er.!. Cc r;o:-at.i on • -... :~ :: '='-- :--.:- ? .. .. --. ... · ---· - _ _ ... ,.':.. _.._...<' ~ ~d ·.~· :. ._-: ,, •, Co-: :-~ :' ~ ~ ..., .__.: ,.. _ -""' ... ~- ~ '?:-s as'C....-:; I . .. ...., ..- ,_. I - ' ~ ~ ..._._ I c 5tG
    • ·,( I I : . rJ l {J1; J. 11 '·· . .1 I:-)': =:S.:.;;~::'"l~f! :r::!: c t'.~e::: t~: t- S i:.': .1~c:. 1 ! c::::::!:::t :: ::: ·.:::;. ::0:!.' ~:.:;1.::.":.:2~ Cc::-..:-.:. -::-.c:::, -::.:-.~ :·::...-~~:.:::- c~ .S.:c-.::·.::.t; ~e.! n·::..:H":.~.:: t=."'t -::,:,!! b;;.lJ: of t!:e i::>'es"t!.~at::.>!- :::; t~::-:c.l re:z;:..:-c::.;:z t~~ ~>.!~j.;, ct. '"~ placed i!l e.::l c·.,~:::-t. !'.:.le. S·.lcb =..ate!'ie..! ;.~ fc~;~ded h€:::-evit~. 2. !he Ofrice of the Directc,r cf Cer.-tral Intelli5enc:e r~s also ~vi~ed t~c.~ t.~e Fede~el S~e~~ c! I~esti6a~~o= ncent.ly c :")~leti:Xi nn im"esti .~a-.io!l o!' the Su?ject. J.cccr:ii=; to "t.C.e ce;:;crand:.::~ de:te::! 21 l·:~y :!.954 cor.ta~ed !.:; file . . . . . ~£ · n:> -'~ ~ ~ •· • ....,.,... .::e .,.,..I s~-.v ... scd us o::. ":lf" .-.;:;:- i, 10·1 •..n+ J. ... s ;:,n.:e;rr-'C!•... l.O:O .rv • ... ,;.. .,.,,_., .... C:'l t.r.e .Subj oct hM been f~is!:~ to t!::e 1-.!:.i te r.o'Jse n:.: ' · ru;",?estet. 'teet. ,;.h~ bfc:-=2.-:.io~ be cbt:;.~. ::.ej c:L-ectly .f.;-.:-:J ~= ~b:te Eo~s = . Yo'J ~7 des~e to ccia:n ~his i~!C~-Zt.ic= t~~t;~ fe~~ li:.ies ~~~~~~.
    • f>ATE : ~1 ltTDJtcr : l . ?.t-f,.:'c~ce is l? ~:arcb 19 ;4 , 2. On ::-..:1.o~e to ::rour ~i~e C~eck T:-a::s-~~~e2 s:~eto'";. c.:?.-:.~~ ;;o Ap..-11 195L, a npresec!athe of the ~e3ti~3tio~ Advise~ Fe:ie:-al Eureeu of thst ~~e files of the Bu:ea~ co~te~s ~~~~t!o~ on .S ubject wbic:b ~s furuished to the lihit~ Rouse. I t ms su~ses-';~ tba't this in!or.:urtion be oMained C.irectl:r !ron .the i7r.He f.ouze. I - -- - --- ·· -- - - · ---· - -- F~t- 0351
    • .. ~ · . '· ·i':l.4 . '. .,..-.-, .~,. ,, .. I / . ..' . . 1-ti. • . . . ' ,·~ -, • - I .. . ; # ' . .. I ' ~::> J,ul:.•t l~~ ;:1!-M I • '' •A .. ., Lt. r..on'l• ~:.Ct..r."":L::, J~ J. :~~ c:;:::::, "" '" . -- .. ___ ... _ :!., • : ,t ' • I • • '. • .. - . .,.. •• ~ ·~ . i:..! :;;,... -r. !.:c l":"U J:~~,. ~. ?Ael 7. 4 J ~ 4 a:a !Ji:":"tll ;·:vm., r.::. o.~!»d ~ "~ .. , • • . ... • ' i I l 1 . . I .. - ·- -·::·c~---~ P,.)JL-;;f_ - . 4,1,.. . .,I ..,.re J"f>>ei~ ~ tho :!ec'Ul"'i t:y o~.oe AZl.ll lleT'O nhrftd t.o ~ ~ ~ !;.ouri ~ tho • ::,:Oj O&i:»d t..~ ,..,.. to b. 1'1lod 1-!l ~ tuea or ~ e IJOJeO' r-o~:.. I l • "• J.. C::l~ I. 'I ''I l' .. • .. [ ~-- ____ ... - ~ ~··- ••''""':' ... .
    • ?. llr • } t .y 1927 t o = (. bor::;;Floro: •, 6o~tb Ccroll oo, In 18?6. fr"" Proaident ot Co:.:pa."lin Hncional Cub:t.-:a do A'lhcioo, BavA:la, Cub•· Be btCUI F.ru1dtat of tbe Cb1:1a llutionlll Aviotico Corporot1C!) 1:l 1933 1 and 1:o 1934 o:-cn=l1·ted c=d bece:::~ th~ Prcd<!-:nt ot . t!lt Ccntrol Aitcratt Ha.nutnctur1ng Co. 1 lb1c:b p1oo~~nd in tb:s fi~ld of tU cl~er~!t te~~t~ot1c~ 1n Chtr.:. · LDttr be b•c~ Freeidect ot Binduat~~ Aircraft, Ltd., vith ~eid­ qu3Ztera at !ansalore, India. Be orsani:cd recru1tca end c~intai~ed the ~triean Volunteer Group (Flyinb ~1eere) tor the r.b1r.ese Air Force. ln 1945 be VA!J cppointed A:Jbesndor to Peru, e. :j in 1946 bc c~e /.::b8.3sa.:!or to Bre:.!l. Bis bo.::: 1e at 2555 LG.!!e Avcpo.:.e, S;.m:>et 1:;1:!.~::1 {i2, Hie.::d l!eacb, a::d. be c.llntatna orticu at 30 Rock.e!ellcr Plazo, J:ew Yor~ City.
    • . I. ( Willi:lm Douglas Pawley --b. Flo~cnc~, S.C. i696; Mc.:rr: !d ·i~ice·; Pres • . Companio K~cional Cuhana d e ;viacicnHav~na, . l9l7-33; Pres. China Nat'l. Avi i! tion Corp., 193.3; P~·es. (organizer) Central Aircraft Mfg. Co., 1934-38 pioneer building· o£ aircraft !act.:>ry in China: Pres. Hin c!ustnn Aircra!t, Ltd. a .BangAlore, India; Organi:ed, recruit.!d, a.nd maintain~d Am: Volunt~er Group (Flying Tigers) !or Cbint'l~e Air Force; 1945-46 Ambassador to Peru~ 1946 Ambassador to Brazil; Homo: 2555 Lake Ave., Sunset Island #2, Miami Beach; O.Uice: 30 Rocke!ellcr Plaza, N. Y.C •. ]
    • ~ : , ~ ,. • • • '· J ... :.... I . :.;, ::..-1 STl'l'US Subj.::ct 1' a c"l~~-;mca la!S b:~:.is nticn J~ed:>~r .. I of the Doolittle Cmcl t~t- lnkr-i.J:l ~op Sacnt £T3.."ltod Subj~ct b:r tha '~1 ~ l:ou5a on 16 Julj• 1954 c!l t.'!., of r.-.:1terial already in tbe .!nc!l ~ re~ult-3 or .tila~ rnr of t."le Feder;D. 1}:.!'~au of I:l~3ti- ~ .. I ., ,, ? I Su!>jGct is .tii~-ei~t yea,r., o! age, ~:-ied Al.!lc nat.i~ bo;;,::. 5i:>~ect his fort.'!al. edccation ot 't.ha C~rdon Hllit.l..-y Acadecrt' in l.9l7 c.d ch:.illlg t..'le ne.:rl. el&~n yea.:r,, onga~d in variou!l 8peC:U:Ut1'n' ·and p~t.iorull.. b:~ir.~~~ ~cll.e:ne3. In t!:e l.ata 1920's, Subj~ct b~ca.~ ints'r"e~tcd in a7iation B.nd .sioco tilat ti::le, ha~ part!.c:ipa!c!d 111 the ca~lo~ot of tta·~ ir.~tlJ i.D CU::,a 1 Chir.a and l:ldi3 •horo be ba-3 b9en o:q;ani.:..:n· a.'1d pre!!!t!ent o! a.i:cra!t fir-...:7.. During World War 11, Subject assi,t.ad in the !or.::ation o: tr.9 A:-:-.e::-ica=1 Voltt::~'t.e-er Group {:Fl.y-4~6 Tiger:s) for t!le Cb.bastJ Air Fo:-CtJ. ~.:L--:ce l9h5, Subj~ct, in a~.di:tio;) to his r...an:r businens operation:;,. r~ b~n c:.cti~ in ~a F~c.!eral Se:r:ica. In 1915, h2 .,.:aa A:-l:ass..<!~o:r "t9 Pe:·~ a::d ' !ro~ 19!..:6 t~ 19L3, l:.eld t~~ so=.il post in Bn:::il. In 19~8, ha al!:o :o.;~~d CO:!:"Ole~d Sec::--e't.<L-:J of St.ata at t.'·H! t!:::.itsG ~;;;t:..c~ Ge:~~::-a.'!. 1951, be o·as !:pecial As~!.st2.:·:t. to t::;;, Se~ t..:.:-:: c-: ~· ~ t.2 ~~ ~::..'": t:·. ;! ~er=:,c=.;2 n...-.:.: o!"' a :.:.::rc ! ~ e ~ o:-. f. c ~ ~! P"="~ ::'rc::t ~-. i' :!':. :.TI ;:- c.s~~:.c~ i..; &::~=·=~:-: 1~51 t~ l:.+':C:!-? $f.,:: '..::..a.l ; ..;;-::-':~:-:...:.....:. ~:..~ t ') t:-.-= S:;::::-:;-~-:; c!' £:::f:n-:.se. 5-.::':>jP.ct p:-ese!:~)' :.s 'L';::: C~ c..i.~ c: it t: E.c..c.=:! or t:-.. 3 l:::t.ar-ccn·ti.ner. ~ Cor:po:-?. t.ion. 25 Sp:!cinl .~c!nser"-to ~a }.$!.!?X•ly i:l ?a; ·!.s z.=c !~.-r~sti~tic..::l .&..:! :;:,:-::.cc::-=....~s. ozd 'rn2sU-'J' l~t.:.c-- ;! c~:::... -ing cc::.C':.ci:.s;. i:'l accc~a-'"e -.~~ c-.:.."-:'!':-.:. p~~~,~c J. ~~7 c~~c~ ~-... 1::(:":~' • ·~ ; ... !::~:.:-.:- ~= c.t c:;:,· L-- 2 :
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    • ·· · •! ·, I I TO . . .. l. J~~s:::·Jc'h ~!; l:1t!~:; c:~cp • D:ol!~tl':) L.'he O!'fice ~r. :=.:. c~. tf2=. t. ~:~ o~ t.h~ Di.;·~ctc:- Sr.t.5c. ~·. . t! ~ ... I, '' jl Co-:-:.H:tc!:, t~i!! Direc ~o::- o! Sec·.l...-it;, ha$ r e-:;::..l~~t.e.! ~;,~ 2. !he Office of the Directo::- of Cer.trnl ~!i nl!!o rcc~ntly I I' ,, iI of Cc:-:!:-zJ. cc ~.::~c ti:,::: :i t~ t~,!:' l:.i.J.ll: of tb~ i!"l"C:;ti;ativ!.' :::...'~te:-i-:!1 rc~O.i..-:~ S~~jo:>ct be ;>lLccd in r.n v"-ICrt file. Sue~ r;:ntc~· ial is for·;a.-ded b~!';:n.tith. tb::t - ,I t~e lotellig~= ce fl.clviscd the-t t~1c Federcl Burcc.u of Iovesti6atio;J co.::J?lGtcl nn imesti;et!o:l of tbe rr..:.~j~;:t. Accordi!l; ~o t~.! ;,:• ~c:-adn1 ~.,detc~ ~9 5 4 ~?nthui.ned 1o::11" 0 ~ 0:1 t~e 1 £ suz~e sted 2;nJ.:y 1 1 0 ¥! that ~h~ info~tion be obtui~ej d~ ect~y frQ~ You n<::;- CE· !:in~ 'tC· c't",:?. ~ t.. "this i ~fc-r::-. =. 7•-::: fEc-cili-~ics an.ilab)e "t.::l ::-'t::" office. •,.:r.:~.f P.o~.:s,:, t~:v~;!": 1 V s cu Us 0~ ~~ n?::-l ,;4 ~ . ~t it~ ~~0~~~10~ :3uu.~ cct l-..!!-1 b ee n f!.:.!'::i~e.J to t.!::e !hi t u House a!"ld · t~~ ~o t~ ~ · SBiJ&L V31D~'Z~ I i: I I I ' t I ji I' t I
    • 0 I • <.-{-'/fie~ .LV.t(;· ;Jtot~:t;h]JJ?JI- SUnJt:Cl': 1'-~~fL::Y, .. Hill:l.!!!J D. I II 1. I~:~:.:-:Jc~ ns 't.~E· O~ficc- of' tt...: DiJ·ecto::- of Ce::"..:- .:?.2 17>:!0~ :. ;c:1~c- ::.r:~.~c<>.te~ tl':e Sl;~·J€ c·.. 1 ! cc:-.::ectio:. :i·~~ !. ~.~ D·: ol! t. U e Co:-:.i t't.e~ 1 the Di.rec~o:- o!' S ec'J.:"i ty has r~:J~::<.cj tb~t ~.";;e l:,;lil: of th ;l in~c:;ti gativc x::.ete:-1.:!1 rc~di;;g t~e Su~j~ct be ?)~ceo in~ evert file . Sue~ ~tc~ial is !'or·;a.-ded ba~eJi tt:.. ., ... l !I I· I I -I f: I I 'I I .! tt.ecl':..-~ents: 1~2 I~
    • • • • ..,..,.., ......... ....... . fJfjia: A1e:noran,dttm . 1 I ( ( .. UN11'J!D STA1 ES G OVEllNi-.1ENT 21 r c;; ' I i I I 1 ? ~!. .I ... .. -· :..J I . I .... aoo;zcr : 17 p;.-:-ru;y, ·.n.ll1s."l D.>u 3las l • Re:ff!.-cnr.e 1954. ~~arch j lo~e3tigation advised ·th~t t~e files of the Burea~ on Subject "~1ch ~' !uni!lhe:i to the lTnit~ House. t.ba~ " ' . f s O:lt!r. to ::rour Nt.i:e Ch~ck '!ra!!S":l!t tnl Sheet c~tc..-d · On 30 April 1954, n r~presen~tiv~ of the 're~eral Eureeu or contains infc~atio~ It ms SU!;ges~ed this infor:~ation be oM~ined directly !rot'l the m:1te Houle·. 2. i • #
    • -~ Trafficante. 47 The criminal operation also involved narcotics trafficking; and in 1963 several Mongoose participants were charged with smuggling narcotics from CUba into the United States. 48 The continued participation of known criminals in this operation and the revelations of drug smuggling were the primary reasons that JM/WAVE was closed down in 1965. 4 9 When JM/WAVE was terminated, Shackley and his staff left for southeast Asia. Subdivisions of the criminal operation remained in Miami, consisting of a highly trained army of approximately 6000 ultra-right wing Cuban exiles, closely allied with organized crime . That association led to the formation of terrorist groups such as Alpha 66 and Omega 7, and the continued illegal trafficking of narcotics.so 4 7 Alleged Assassination Plots, supra, pp. 74-130 . Ranelagh, supra, p. 383; Kruger, supra, pp. 146. In the summer of 1963 a raid on Cuba took place that was financed by weapons dealer William Pawley. Besides Pawley, the crew consisted of Trafficante associate John Martino and Cuban exiles, including Rolando Martinez . There is evidence that Trafficante and Giancana helped plan the raid. ~., pp. 131, 146. H~H X2~k ~im~~' January 4, 1975, p. 8; Marshall , pp. 37, 135-136. 48 49 5 H~H X2~k ~im~~, January 4, 1975, p. ~1U2t:~, a. °Kruger, S!JPt:Sl, p. 207; Marshall, supra, pp. 125-134. 17 --
    • ....... ·"'1. . • ·. ! . . .• : -~J.': haJI : ..,~,.,...~..L;..lllw!JUi _/_-::·...· !:'!'XC~ ·. -·:-~~,:: ..~. d~v · ~ · ..- ·.:. . •' ' ·:··- .._. . .: . .. ll- ';
    • ,- ..-, ! -·~ --~.--~-;:··:. J .• ... -' •··. ,. ,' ... ,, ·•. APPROVEO FOR RELEASE 1993 CIA HISTORlC~l REViEW PROGPJ111 ' 20 ·February 1964 1rEIYIORANDlThl FOR: ATTENTION. ... ~ .. SUBJECT Deputy Director of Security (Investfga tions & ·Operational S~pport) ID/l, 1Ir. Coleman William D. PA1YLEY REFERENCES .· • . i attached :' attached attached· ~ that Subject be grantediiiJ for use by J1ITfAVE on a e references reflect that Su9ject has been contact :with the AgencyJor a number of d th t the Western Remisphe Division was in October 1959 to enable their contact w~ J. 2. . • . Refer any questions to .. I. . <> :. ,,,, · i,,, ,,,, -· . -·---- - · ~J .. . -·--·. - I I . Chief, SAS Attachments: a/s J _,., __ 1 - ••• - . .. ., .. :·: ... ~ ~ "!~~;.·.14 .. ·,. ..;.;~.. ., I I I
    • ... ·. APPROVt.O rCR REUJ~ 1993 CIA HiSlOR}CA(tH:'VItW ~ilOGRM., . . .. ' .. ,. ' . . ~ ·~ · . .r ,' ·, . Cia ( .. - .:/ (When Filled In) J.!E::-.!0RAI."''DJM FOR: ATI'EN'I'ICN : FROM _ . :Deputy Director o~ Security- (Investigatioll.9 : · e.nd O!lerations.l. Support) p~~ ti1111»"alX::ugl...:ut. : 78435 • . .. .. - - ;~ - ~~-: ~~h~:-~~ . ·.· ' :9«Cli-t Stib.je-crl:-'5 tut-e .,~.......,•- 'bwl~ Cc:»iP11:1i't;f • - ~vat:!.= as a J".3tVX .. . : . ..... - . .. .. . ·.": . .... ·... . . In ·accordance with the }'lrovisions. set :forth in ~, . . . _ : ... 2. ~ 4 .. . ! . • .. ....,( . -I . ~ . .:·:·7·/.. . .. .. . ~ '· ; tor the use o:f' .. the Subject as above. set t'ortb. 'in paragrapll. 1, · .. · 3· ' themse~ves a.re not to r e_pre.se.!lt . as, nor a.re they to be represented as, employees or CIA. ·.- 4. Your attention is ce.lled to the :fact that not tute complete compllen.ce 'ld Therefore, it you should desire ~ or use o:f' this individual, a request f'or approval. to cover acy proposed change should be submitted to t.h;U o:tt1ce. 5. ...1 This approval becomes inval..id ill the event the SubJect • s su months of' the date o~ this services are not ut1l.ized vithi.n memorandum. FOR THE IIIRECTOR OF SmtmiTY: CLOSED J ~ 1 . ;r___, .hn/ Victot''a. f., - - COLFlWl/D:Jb/7 A:9rll 1964 ~c-R-..-c:: -s (When !"..i.lled In) Wh;l.~e OROUP l. Excluded matic auto~grading ecl.assUication •' ' !. .~- . X. . .· .· ·· · i '
    • ) ( ·e. ( ( JOSE A. BENITEZ . .. BOXJ47 SAN JUAN P.R. CHAIRMAN . · . '·.":: ... · :. · ·' . . . .· . .... . . . : ·:' ·: •.· - :_ · . ·. ·_. ·: · · . .. . ·.. .· . October 18'; 1980 ._·. . ...... · .. .. ...:. .·... . STRICTLY 7 .PERSONAL . AND CONFIDENTIAL .. ·. . .' ..... ~; .-. . ::_·:: : ~- : .. ·. ·.. . . : ... ;· . . ~: : ' _ ~- ·u i ~ -b ' . . .... i .A ·~ · ·n u ~ --------~• . '! .~ ·To:' .. .~Jlr. ·.irill tam D. Pawley . ·:· ·.. :,-. 280. J!~:. E•. 17th Terrace ,.... ::;. #ia~t . .32 1 J:lor'ida · F~o~; ..;. Jlr:~ ...; ~··~~ · ·A. Ben ttez~ Chairman .·. ·. IJernC,c ra·t tc ·PO. rty .. : . .. .··.Puert.o !lico . : ·: .. .·..., _ .. ~ : :' . ."·: ·..' : '• f . . ·. . -~ .. : .. 8 U B J E c . ------ "·T·:··: ·'. cuban . - • ,' • ' t : • ', • •• I "• I • • ;:, ' ' ; • , Revolution •• . · ...... : : :Aite ·~ ·: di;~uss ing with you and our mutual Jriend 1 ·.::'·. Senator· Smathers, yesterday the Cuban situation and the Cuban .Peoples 1 tdtos.yncrasies 1 and knowing your knowledge of the ·- · - ···- ··-pre:Jent. ·c uban· leaders in exile, I take the l tberty of rn.aking you the ·/ .a llowing. recommendation. ~ · . 1 ~ · I ~m sure that my recommendati or~ will be of great help to · ur dem~cratic cause and the j'u.ture development of o democratic movement in Latin America. · . . . •. ~ .. ·' .Captain Eladt.·o Del Valle . 8245 Colltna Avenue ·: :. · Jltamt Beach, Flortda. . .Telephone: UNion 8-8700 ( 37 yea r8 of 2. : ·. . G~Lter..--~x. II . . ' .JII:. •) .. . . ~· ·~·.~""- · "' ~ad the .pl~~~re of ;·= eet,ng wtth · Oa.pta.lri · Del I Valle and dtscusstng h~s plan. res ou. roes. He was ready to tnuade Cuba last week, but an my suggestion he postponed tt. l .. t . ' + •••• ... . : . •• ,.. •• ..~ · .. . • .• • ~ ·:. i. f t. -·- _ __j ·.·. . I • •• ~. • • 1 •• · : · .... · • ~• • •• • >' . • •• .. . ·: ~ . :
    • ,; i ) ( ·(. ( ( I JOSE A. BENITEZ CHAIRMAN BOXI47 SAN JUAN P.R. . I Page · iff ... ·. · . ,• I I I ' I· . · · ; . If ·u,e c~n offer help for htm, hts sacrifices wtll bring . be~ter results than allowing him to .worK by himself. . . · · ~ .H~ :has no relation wtth other acttue Cuban leaders in his pl~ns!· even though he is a personal frtend of them. . At t _ e present ttme Ca.ptatn Del Valle has 150 men-h armed--who: were· ·ready to go last week and will go as soon as Del .Valle.·· so . d t rects. . fhey are well equipped with arms and everything needed. · · . . He has in his group a person who was a Commanding Officer of t _ e - old Regular C'u.ban Army and twelve other h Officers from both Castro's and the old Army. These Officers are going to .establtsh contact immediately with 1,500 people prepa_ ed by ·. captain Del Valle in one of the Jlrovinces of Cuba. • r . -. ·ne· also has contact in Cuba with the organtzatton called El-J.!ar. ·- This organtzation in Cuba, as well as Captain Del Valle's organization outside of Cuba, consists mostly of e:c-membe .r s .of ._ the mil ttary class of Cuba. !! EM A R K §.: . I think Captain Del Valle Knows what he is tallrtng about. · His theory is that different battlefronts should be _opened and _these battlefronts should be dtrected by people who Know about mtlitary movements. . - .:o;r. ,_,..... . . ·. He ~ has resources enough tn CUba to opeh a second front ten days after his ~lrst ~aunchlng In another Proutnce at the · other eztreme of the first one. l • r. • . ·. ....:•• • • ····' · ~.~· .: : ~ - . •!.• ,. . ., ·r . : .. ·. •. ·.• • •• • • Jill • ~ ••• ... ... ... ·....,.:' .. . . -:i .• .. .• . . r-- t:_~-1 . ..:·~ ~; ... : . ·l
    • ( ( JOSE A. BENITEZ BOXI47 SAN JUAN P .R. CHAIRMAN I I I ~ Page I. .. 1. With your help, Captain Del Valle can make bigger . mouement than the one he ts ready to launch. He can enforce more the sabotage tn the Province of Havana, where open' fighting ts not foreseen • . 2. · As he q.lready counts with his own ,force, done and achteued by hts own sacrifices, we should provide those 150 men wtth e_ tra equipment--to be carried by them for z those t~ Cuba ready to join them. 3. -.. Also, I tmagtne, some financial help for the famtltes of those going over there can bring a favorable reactton. This ts a- very urgent matter and Captatn Del Valle ts on the moue. He will apprectate i t if you will get in touch ~tth our distinguished friend as soon as possible. Once more, thank you for your great interest tn our hemisphere. --- .•. -· . .. .,, · ,_ ' ' ··~ . ,-r . • , • t. ~'I.. - • • .. . . .. . : .: . . • • • •• ~ • •.. • • "':: . .. t · :' ·· . . · • • ... • •• :- ·- " I t. . • .. .: l.-:.:' !Ff ~ - ..-~-· .•.~.- ... · ; i -- . ~: ·. :• . ... ··-··· .·. . • • • •• • • " • . .• il • ·· .. . . : I·
    • , ) ·• ·•. . . APPROV£0 FOR RREI-S£ 1994 CIA HISTOPJCJ1. REY!£W tid~(L~~ ··, ( . . :· 18 November 1960 .. . MEMORANP~.M FOR: .. : . .·: :- ~-"'-~ C t-~ t::"-ck_ .• c.t A SUBJECT: · ·. '·. -:. /Correspondence ' . '7.· ·, '· . .·. .. ' ,• • . :. . . : ·... · . : .. : c orre spondenC:~- -~~o_rn • ~ 0 . • . ,. (. ) •I ·.... nothing of particular triom•nt. . : .... ·· ·: :·. . . . ~ - ··. . :. again befo~o pa.s slng o~ to. o 1 . .. . . . . . . s~et I would suggest, howeV&r, you acrsan it . . .. I have looked through it hUl"riedly and. ,. , 2 •. For .J. . •1 .You. s_ ould be aware of and somewhat intere•ted in thf> (. ..l h ' !act tha~ ",. ' . . . : . - haa establishod a new (and according to him productive) . . channel -to President Elect• , Kennedy through George Smathers. Acco:rding to . :· ·. ·: :: ' · /'1 JSm':'the_r~ con~rs~t~ons with the President Elect have lefd lt) . . . • . ·: . : • . - .. ·.' '• .. . . po~ition ~t he now to take the . •, .·. . . . .. ..!.....-- should not go along with the Department o! State .· - .. considerably mo%-~ ~onservativa position than lnally people - ··-· - --·- .. in the Department and "tha fun house ~ " I. ••'.• .·· •__ ~,. ~:.;t . ; . . . ., ' •.'* . .. . ··-· I. . . •· . . J.: . ·; .. • - ~ . • . '. ·, · : .. ... • • ..· . • • ,A. ., · ~ ·· ~ · • • • ' · ·. • .. ... . ...·. "' .. .... ·.. . .. . ... •~' .. ! I~ .. ..
    • i .. )~ • Ct.ASifiCA liON - DJS.PATCH Chie:f 1 -1H Div!31on INfO r ··· ~ -··_; FROM ':1 Mio.mi t ' _,· - . Report of Conta~t ~O".J ,, .• . ·~ • t.,) t t) -.:n . e,;..· ~ .-·.J·---- 25 September .. . ·with Mr. 1959 INDEXING CAN BE JUDGED BY QUAliFIED HQ. OESK ONlY ltft ·. r t_1 . .. ~ c .,.,-- (.r J..;-------- • . . ~ )(_ ..:·~t*~~L~~~~ . 1. I first spok~ to Hr. PAWLEY about Mart~IAZ amayo) our i~terest-in him, and conveyed· to Mr. PA~-1l.EY < ,') ~equest that he give some consideration to bow DIAZ Tamayo might obtain employment here. Mr. PAWLEY said that be knew DI.AZ Tamayo, that he ~ad discussed wi this subject previously with ~- ,, . 1and that he was perfectly willing to see -what he could do. He suggested that I have DIAZ Tamayo call his · office _ for an appointment -and he -would discuss it with him ~ersonally. This Will ~e. arranged during the coming veek. Wi.ll report more on tile results. (;~~- · : ; . _. . · _ L. t_!len· into~~ vis~ted ~eptember that he was 24 1959 by one residing a~~56o So~.:lJ:<!~_~_v_ay_d, _l'•_]~ B<:~><;h, Telephone 3-6258), who · told him that he -was·--~ing to org~"f..~~___yhat " lie~ ct e d_ to be a very formidable force .to take early action against the CASTRO gove rnment . Mr. PA'-ILEY said FREYRE is a . very vell-bom.Cuban 1 a. nephew--of Julio- SANCREZ. ·- li'REYRE had in his possession· a l~st of prominent CUbans ,.fuom he said he expected "WOuld · contribute to his efforts • .: The list included such people as PORI'UONDO, Julio LOBO, Tony VERONA, Julio SAnCHEZ, · and a number of _ other very prominent Cubans. Mr. PAWLEY showed me this list ~hich he_ is_ having typed so that I might have a copy. The notations after each of these names wre to the effect that they were "eXpected to cooperate" and in most ·cases no contact had yet been made W;ith these peopl~. On the face of _ it would appear FREYRE is pipe dreaming. it · · ·. ~ Mr • ...PAwEE!_ Fab~~{presentr;Y '• 3. "rn any · case 1 he told Mr. PAWLEY that in the realization that they would need a stag~g area · for their venture they alre~~~_ha~ a commitment from British authorities in Nassau · to make_ availableto them a small is"lanc'f1ii ·-tiie"'cari'bbean_He made references to a prospective--acquisition of aircra:f't and boats and to the existence of organized · bands of armed men in several provinces in Cuba. To f.fr. PAHLEY's astonishment, FREYRE bluntly tried to enlist 1-tr. PAWLEY's financial as s istance. ... . _: •. .· 4. Unfortunately ·Mr. PAWLEY said he could not recall the ~ny details of the long stor,y given him by FREYRE but that he expected that FREYBE was going to visit him again on 26 September, at whiCh time PAWLEY will attempt to note m r e o carefully the details _ FREYRE's planning. He said also that if in talking to of FREYRE aga in it seemed a reasonable thing to do he 1rould try t o get FREYRE to t a lk to me. In any case, it waf! agreed that I would call l-1r. PAHLEY' again a:t'ter FREYF~ ' .=· next visit. · f ! I I 5· In the course of _ this discussion of FREYRE's visit, Mr. PAvTT,!;;t' · ... aid that tilis lTaS rather typica1 of an increasing number of visits he was ge·cting f'rom Cubans and. allovred as bow, since he doesn't have a retentive memory, ib was a shame he doesn't have a recording machine in his office. .. ·_. .::.~. .. .· : -.:''1tJ;'· -f~t'"' ,~'!'''~4':->f- ' : ( ~I) C.. 4 c ),A.o~ 0 '-." ~ •. ' ,. ,-liab; 1 ~i ~-~~:_s_3_____r_t_~_i_t_t_~_L_:_:_:_·_·_~-~-_·___·_c_w_~_·K-A_~______M_x_--~-·~~---_i_~_~)i~T~ jl ~ ' ~: · ··~~~~ · ~--- ~ · ·~ ~ICH 01-=~~: ,; ..~ . :. ; - ·~ . .. ; • ;.• ,.,~;,- ,...--.,.._....,.. •~.· . .. ...•.•..·.::.. ...•. . ---------- ~ . ~' _, .. ~ . . . .•., ,• , . 001 ·••• ;.. • .,. .Ul .. .. ··- . "I
    • / i.Jirect.or or' Lientra....L lnt.':!.Llige!1ce Willin.m DoLL~la.s P..'..'.fi.Ef l. ~or""arded r.~:re...,ith are the Sec·~i ty Office files c .;ncEC>r- ninJ, the captio:: ~:i i::~ividual. infor~ation to be given info up to and provided discretion were exercised in his source . At t'b.at tine i·:ation?..l .A..7enc includin~ Secret develo~ent as a ~c~h;,e;c;;k::;s~w~e=r~e~c~o?n~d~t:.? : 'c~t::.;e~·:::ii:'w?':: 7 :1::ifc h~d~i':~c~l~o~s=:eP:~.:n:;on:-un;;;;f;a;;:~;:;o~~;~---~).~e~;T.;;~;:;;;_ . . . . . _....,*".., s -~ wn regarding the Subject r s loyalty, ~~:'.:-9.!1..::>.: .. ~sq:p.e ·were disclosed r_~~~_:1:~-~ft..!:i~..D~P~t.Y_07he Subject 1 s inv~stigative rre-·a.-r 'the State Depart::.ent lias not available for r~vi~·...· at that time. 3. ~ !~ July 1952, J '-Ihich request '"'as then ca.11celled on .30 Daca::ber 1952. At that t:be, the s ~:.b j~ct 1 :::; 3-t.;>.te De")8.rtne:-~t sec:rity file ,.:as made av·ailable and c:::n-ta.:.~a::!. ero€atory-'info"r"L:lat.'ion-a:ileging b"iack. ;ark'~t' . activTt:fes~- i !lc.i:::e t~x difriculties, po3sible misuse of land l ease naterial, a~~ questionable money transactions. It was also sho•m that the Subject's wife had written t~e President of the u~it8d st~t9S questioning the legality of Sub ject's Cuban divorce fr~ cer, ~:~ . ~hich he married his secretary;_ _,.......___ ___ · 4. In ~·lc:>~ch 1953, the Subject's Treasury Depe.rtme:1t file wa .revie<ed and refl ected that the Subj.e7t -~as inves~.i~ted for ~nco:ne -tax-~evB.S'Ion'for" ' t'he'~years09J4-1944., and ~d to'118.ve' been a non-r e sident citizen during that period a nd not guilty of tax evasion. The Secret Service rad c onducted ~~ investig~tiou of Subject's first wife, follcuing her l etter of complaint to the President, and f ound her sane, although suffering from sever9 n:antal stra in. Considerable der ogatory infornation •.:as ccr:ta .:..::1ed. ·n this file r elative to Subject 's b~siness ra?utaticn and et~ics. ---.........---·~ ..... ---- ...__, ._....----... - ·- -·- --- --·.......... .. .. ·---- - ~- 5. If this offic 9 can be of ar.y furthe~ ass istance in this ::J~tt er, please let oe knoH . --- __ .- . -- ~~Bi~ D;:~?'-?r.~-~f Security · · --{f1)7
    • ·... ·.:,.. / ··.·~~·;;:r~~~f.~!~~~~!~~t~: >:6~t;:,~gt;: .-~.';~~, ~: .· ·: ··:: ' .. : : ...-. ·,· -· -- ~" . .. - -·· .. . r~entat.i.-:a or E:aaeq:Ia.-te::-3 :rlll. call on 7-~t~ · pri..or- to :·tho depa.~ o.l- ~ rep.ro:sar:rta~i7e · to !:'.O.r9 t'Ul.l7 ~ :JOU co~ ~ ::.atta::- aad -~ . ~s-.le:-_ a:rq_pti..._..--:b~ .. 4. ..1. -~,:;';;: c ...',---~~ ~'' ;~" ·~-.;..it~;.:~:~~.,::a~.:::: -~~~~ ~~..; =~~;~- ;-;"• ''0CfCC: 3ubttit~ to Lie.aCq~-s as soon . -· ·~. : 7• • • . , • . . ·.. :~<:;s~~;E.:~:--.~· ~_ : . ~-- · - ·· ·· . • :. ·- . poesibl.e- ·- . <13 : ·- ·;-... ~-... .:......::- ..· . . .. ::. _.:"' :~ . ol -. ~ -- .• - . ..:_: •• : --:. ·.:. "':. ~ i· . .. ~- ...... J.-~-~-~ ~-~:.~:.:~;_.:_··_:.._·_·.·_.::l.=_ ._: _ : . -=~·:: . .. :: · ·· . ·;; · _.,._,:..: - - ..·... - ·-·.--:· - - ·- : t - . - . .., ' ,' _... .. , . . .. . . ..: - · . : . · - -. .· - ·· ·. ;..:--: .• • ..•::·,:·_:~-- ··~ ~~--=- . =-:·- ' ....;:: ....: . . ·.:._:z~.:,:. '7~ . ._. . .--:-:: ~- ~-~ ~ . -~ . ·.~-.-·....._·.~~ :"' ·.. :....... =~~.-~~.-~ .:·_;:: --~·.:_-~-~.: .·._.· ~_: ·?- ,. -·' .. .: - · · . _ . _.:~.:.:-: .--. ~ . : :··.:·_<-~ . ~ - -":··-~· . - . :·· : :--..._ ·~--:_.. .:·· - -~·~.... ..:;._;.,~_:. .:.;. -~. . .-: , ' ,' JP·._ ·-:.":".._- :_-.:.:·· · .. ,,.;:'!-• ~~·.:. ....·.""-.: ., . ---~--- -~ ·-·· .. . ~- - - lo" ·_· ~=-- - - . . '· .:. :- ..-.~ .. ,; :. _ . ; . ~.._:. ::; . - -·-· . . _. :.'-1-.' ·.. .. . .-·.... . - - - . . ; -~-::!: ... _ .. - . .-- . ... - ~- ·~ .. .. . ....... .-.· _ -.··--. ~ - :' . ·:· ·-· . .. ; . ..; .'_~ ~.. ·. ·- .. · ·.:- ! • -. ~ .:............ : .. ··-· ·. .. 0 1 ,• - :• , • --... ,: •• • . .:_~-:--:; ::..~~-~ -t:·~~- . ._ 0 ~ - .. .t.- -- -. -.. ~ '-.,;. 'f :, , :~.:; ~.;_•:, 1:~' ....-: :. - ., ,. . .... . ..;- . ..:.] -:-:- ~ .. ., , ... : - =.::.~ • .~ =-,_-· :··· :·.:·· · • •. ·~·.·,·-·.·~ .-:. : - =~ - i •.• :.....;.-_: _-;::·-;~-: :- .:..: -:·'!'·-..~::: "' .. ': .' ..... , ·. ·.. . : :··: · ·... . ··:::;~: :-':."· · ·. . •··: . . - -·~··::_ :: ; . ... : - ~- •, _; , -.:_: : - . :- ~: "- · _- 9 •, ._ - 0 I ·.. . .. . ,,f _ ...- . .:.:.-··.:_, ..... -:-·-·- --~-... ·· ···: . ... ·.'· ._~.·--.7 .·..... :: ._. -:- - .•__ -··_ · .. _ - -· ... .. . . . .,; '" "" -. . .. . 0 ~- · - ·- -- - .. ~ - -- · · " .. ·, .-_ • . ~~-.;~-· ... :.-. ~ .: ~:~:::._-:?~./_ ·_ "':--:..:··~:·. ~-- : ,_- - ·-~ - -·~.:.;._ ;·· ... .-· '·"" .... . -· . - - · ~ ::.~-.::·:. :· ~ -. ~ . _ :· = ~~ ·.-,· _ ... . ._. -. .. - _. . -~-- ~.· ._.•...·.·_:.: ...• ·_ ' - . .: : :- '. - ~- ·-- . . ":· ···. ·; . .. . : ::_. . . ·.... _ -_ . -··· .-: ·-·,' .· · -.- ~·. :. ·,- .· . ...~_.·:.~~ -~.:·_:;.·.~.-:.· :.~,.~;.:~:>>.' .:~·-:. . .. · ;..-·.:... . ::.:..::.-~ ~- . · .. :.: .. . :- . ... ... .. ·.-- :.7'. -... : ,._ : . -;-.·.. .:_ -.-~ .· -~. .... . -· . _-·':_: . . ... ' ":' : ·. : ·: . . .. . .. . . -:..::~: ·:_=-- .~ ~-~'.. . . -_·::·-_. ...-~ ·-:..~...~~- .-: - .~ ~ · :- - .. p ·.. . :~ -; -+' ·t •! 'i . -· . ·.:. •• __ _ _ : ... ~-!· .~ ~~~2,·:~:. ~ .--~-~~- .: - .. - . ·-· •·.. : ;'' ..~·-: :::.. . . ·. ..... ~ .:oo. . .·. .__ .. .._'· j :-:<:·· ;· ·.i -~ ., •~, ,:.:_.~~·.::..-·:. -.; . -r -· ... -- .': ..;...·::::.·.--;:.:·::-:. . -. -~- - ~ --~ - ·:.:.- ~:--·;· ~-· ..- . ·.:-.-"' .. - .... .. .-; ,._ .. • ... . - ·~--:,...:..:·:.:.":- .~.;: .·.···~.·~~~-._. -:.:r·_-·~-~-:_~:~~·-.';_ -- ~: · -:··~ :;:-.: ~~-- ~ .... - ~ - . .. . ; -~- . -<... - =- .:~.-"' . . .. . :~: ..::_ ........; -::__._:...~.. --. ~~.:_--.~ ~ :.-.·.·-· - -.._.-_ . . -· .... ......::~... ""' .,· ·- . .-.:· --- _~_;:·· . :-~~.:· :· - ~ :·-- ·-- · · : . -· . .. . .:. -.. -. . -·: ~ _--::- ·..·.--~.··...:. : "":. ."':::.. . .. . .. ·-- ._. ;, ···- . .. ' ·~;-~ - ·~·. :.·- __ _ ~ · .-·: ··~~~-~:·:-:.. .. .·.~ _-:. : ,· ~--~-- .~·, -~=,~~:.i·=~--~-~~~j~1<·.:L_~ii*iiii~~£~~t:~~~~~~;-~- ~.~=~: =:;~::~:·-·· ~ - ~ .:-~.7.. --~~' . ·~ :. .. r
    • . ·- ·: ~: ...::~~-~- . - .. -.... ', • ' ··-,. · ·. -'- -:"':~ ----- -.;. . ..:..,...,...:. ... :-··- . , -~.. . .. :--. .~.. .:..·':~-~~(· -:::-~7~~--l.: ~: .. ··- : :..:-...... -~· .- :. .: :_-:-::·_:~:j_~ APPR~VEP. ~~R-. fi~-~:;_7:~~9-t.. ·-.·~·.; . ,~·~::··~-:-,~,s;·H~-- ~ . ::·=~.: -~: .":.~:: -~- ·.: -~- ~;.:{:~ RlC"' "fVIEVtvND.CRAM· ;: ~--· _. :_ ;·'?'·..·-,:· ~_·, _ .. ·· · .nn.,..·>· :..~:·. ~·:~~~·,:.r ,· ·~:: ~-·,. ._:. ~- · :·. -:.:::{~_ -- . · -CIA ·HISJO · .n~ . J~ .. ·---~----... ..---- -~- . .---·- -- ... --=---·-1 - ~ - ·.· ._. . .., __ . . .._..; -·... .:..~.:. ...:._ ___ _ .. --- - ·-· ..!.:-.~ .. ., -·:·~:: '· :~.~-'t;:~;:~:~J~~i;J.~~;::.t~~~~-~~l=:')~Ht?2~-~~:~-~~:-_:·:-~ ·-~ ~·. ··: ~ : . :~. : : :· : ' ~ .. . . ---- ,-_·:. ........: - . S~...:. .... . ..~-- ·.. *-~ .. ?~~ ~i111a:::a D.--.····-· ....... -·./..•.:-:.-~- ·· ·~ -:- -.: . r _ .. - .. ·-- ·-:..·-~-·-.:. ,~ . . ,.:.. ~~;f";~§:,:;r~~~lt£?r:~~)~z:i;i,fii~~;;:~~1iit:f~~fi:~~~ ~< ; . . ;: . . . •-~- -·- "'.;,.:.._"""..r~ --~..Q-..<•.....- ~ :•o~:-- ~·,. . .C· ~~,.'f"';""~·- .. .1-"~~ .. tf>• -" · " ~ ·,·. t - _.~... ~·-· ·~~ !"'.:· ._. ~ , ... . · '.:·;~': :t:;~:i~:::~;i1i"~~_;;~;1~f~:IQ~~£~~S,~ii";?i~lfj . --,;·!.~~--.;-:--:·:·- :· .;~;~~ otttce•·on~ s~acto~·l9S9~:.-,.. l:!SA@..mnRS=:F~~~~~ , ~ : ~ .-,_~:-~;~~~r:~;Z?~~~~{e;~-~:;~;~; -(~·/:~:4::·;~~-~;;~~:~}f~~~5~f-~;it4~s~~f?Ji~~~~} _ · · ..: : 2...-.;- Subject.~-. ~-nntl:r re3::l..Css in ...1~ "'m~,- r...:..ar-f...d.1;..: ;-:·.~~ .:.-·~ ·:.7 ·":'·."·;,:::_ ::;':~~-~ .1s=a 'J. S~ct~11:bo· ..,~. .~on 7 Sep~er 1.39)• .~ Ea _ h3.:s· _: .:.:.·~- ·:_ ::-: '=--~{1J : had a l.o!lg ca...~ in L.ati!r k.,.r_ca.u a.f'.fa.i.r:J iihit:a. -t .... ..r::,udad' a<:: .~-:_.:. . ·, · --~-~-~'G~·:· tcur as u-~.. s-:. ~~ad~ to. .Pe=u and 31.4bseqt:.entlj to. ~il. . ...··::: .-~::.:.::;;:-,:~ I.:1 ;::::,~ r~ ~_,.. he. ~ en~· b ?lt...-olJ:nu:s ru~d.- ~- .,-T :--3 - ·-- ,~-.'--~~~~ acti7it!Cs.. i.a the.· ~:nini~ Rem:Wli~ and has 381'7'ed-'a:l a .. · · _ .. .. . :--'~~; _ ·.. >~;: col'.stil•.,;a~ to ther :Jcsrl,..,~ca!l Ga~r..nent ..-: Ha h.as · eooce..~ted ~';.!1-·.:. : ,.. :_ ;:~-.--~;:.:. C-QIJ:.l...'""S on nn:::arous- ccca3~ o.=n :1.3· a ~ ~2I:d ,....,-? -t!la : -~--·· ~>'<~:~··· ~ · • :70~.!~;;:;;;:i~~~f~ii~;;~~~§J~~~/~~ 0 ·:·an - q~ to· Hi.a:::d,:.ilor-Ca ao as ta· ~.·iva ~~tb.s~ at"t..u:::::::o!l.~ ~- =.:.: ·:::_~.:::;.::~.· . . ·_- ..;.-~ : · ..· or- earli ·-~ o:tl5 October·-:tor·. tha jnapese· M ' · .. FP · · · :;_;-:;_...-....: -::.~-:;~.~.:z..1:.-~ ..~, ~. J: .•.. . . . . . . . . . a . .---~;,'!.~. : :f.:~~L~"t.."::::· _:~, ;-- -:~·. h 7 ' • - -~certain ~war:, o.C : in~:rt_ to jGCr.-::~m. :~ . UPon: ~::~J:·~::_. :r:=-~j.~:_~~:~ ...<7Q..... - • h ,_a. --.: . ~ -:u·~.~o.va..l."_o. ·- :yt:rur ~--..- a;.,·nJ aAL,tt- ·_s~~ · co..,.~~ : _; -~·· ~ , . . ~ .· _ ., :~-:.'" · · .~..a.!.t:'"''P~ o:t·ccL!.ni v=A:U.-.:.-:-::··. =_- -...·.;,·....._:.:=:-c..;;;J·':.;::"':'· • • . ·.. - . . .,,..;.~ la -6..~ 0 , . ""~ • ~ " 0 0 _._:~ .... _ _ 0 • • • .. .. - " " '· ~ ~ • • .. , . • • , , . ., . 0 ~rl.ll maks.· all ... ths ne~3arj : ~-eam+...s _ z~~--jmri" :r-ep~e.... ~:iu.za·:-<~ - :~~;~->~ -_-,:- _-_~:l . . . to-- gain._ axcess to·..tha.__Subj~1 a o~.l~~a :·o:-rer:the. ~~~ · o.±::.. ·;-: ..--::. :·= :-..~.~-~-,~?~~~ . --·: ·16 ·_- ·1:7 -'and · :18: O~....ober.: ~ It should b&·-:c.oA-..a:i ~ ~ - 1.3- be:i...!:g - :..;' .,_'··.: ...>-~;_:·... ;_ ~· .. ·.. ~·'· :... ~ ,:;_!:// ®~- ~d.th the ·.run cor.!Jent .and -~_:.;,r69il.:-6f tha.Snbject.:~ Tha ~-. :~ - ~ - .:_~~- -~.~ 0 Htj .- -~ ·----~-,. -- -~·_. _ :-- -. . -;,.,,-~-r / 0 eq~1ipment. - to ba 1l3ed ~ tbi.s as~Ji.;~Rtrt neces3a..7 iCiil ~ -:_~· -:. - · <:~: ~·-:_;~ ~·~~~r -- "~~: ~-~~ ?7~~~j~~~~>%~~;?~;;:zi;Ilf-:--";~;:;.t~· ;":.~f~ ;: Q.ct 11·: sa ····.· • :.•! .::., 7·~~ - --- ) ... 0 · I") · : ~u ' ~ n .· ... .. ..... -· ·.-,.: ..•·· ... .. - . ~· · --:..--~-- -. ···-. - .__.. . .. ............. ~o, ·:--. ~:...;_! ~ .: =~ - :1~-u--~·-~,-:'::.~·.:;:'+.~.;''~~.:· ;·.-:. ., ~. .. . · •' ··"--.:C...... r' .. , .. . -~ .,..~!' .,,~ ·"~ ' >i·_: _,~· ~';W.'f''{tf;•: -~..A' ·-~~~~~~ ~ ~. ·~ ·:;.:; . " '~--")·~ ~-~~ r . · •:"' 1..· • ... !':' : . •• .••, .· '!: : .: •' , .
    • '· . APPROVED fOR flflfASE 1993 CIA HlSTORIC~L RFlliEW PROGRAM 1 1 o:-:- ~959- A'l"'DiTION . Deputy Director of Security (Inve s t igat i ocs· and Support) FROH SUBJECT . ; L ~- ~terence is ~de to y-r::rrrr 1:1emorandum dated 7 October 1959 wherein ·: · an approprl.ata ws requested to enable you to uae the Subject 1n _ connectiom vitb his e:xUID.:Jive eo·~cts 1dth individuals. ot :tbe,. -l.atin~""'-erl..~:r. - countrios • ., , .;;';, : ; --:··-.-~· .: ·.s. ·. ..,_,....; ~ ..· . . :: . , . .• : '+ -::f~;~!;l~;~;:,:,~ ') ' ·~ • '!i;_:~: :··~ -.: :.: ··. ~:- . ·.· ..! . ~ • . . . .·::. co' ' . . . ...- .: ~ .. . ._ _ . ·.· ·.·~ · • ::'/; ''}'.tj~(+~·~: ±t . 2. In accordane'e vi th the provisions set ~th in Clandestine"and Clalldestine Services Instruction Services Instruction No. is granted ~or the use or Field No • ._, a~··· the SubJect, as ~escribed in your request as set forth i~ paragraph l, a bove. 3 . . Subjects · · -·__·: · · · · ··--·· · :- -· ·. ·. ·· : . -- ~ th~e~vea as, . nor are . --~·::··-<·· : . :-·:_ -: (. - are not to r epresent .· . . ~..: :- ·; · _ to be represented as, employees or CIA. · . ,· .·:·:. · :: ;·~ ··: · _ ·: : . __ -~ :- ."• 4 •. ,.: ,- ,· ·. , ·:-, :~=.7 _.·.. ~ . .. -: .:.:.-:- ·.:.: · ..:~=!;~ ~:~~:.. . :~- ~=-~;?~~:;~·.-:";.::~..~_::::~ attention is caJ.J.ed to the fact tha.t.-·a. . _ . _ _ .- ·-·· · ' ' : · · -· ·· s DOt constitute complete compliance with~ :....:y-.. _ _ ,'.;:." ·- ·. / ""~, .......Qtion 10-21.0. !Illere!'ore) U you should desire at a later · .-· ._,;·--:· change the status or use or this individual) a. r equest for ri.:IJy proposed chal::lge should be submitted to this ·: ~ becomes invalid in the event the within six months o-r the date I ......:.-~ :·... ,._. ·'· ·-· .., ·. ; - .. ~ . . -·· . to . .. . ... .:_ .· . . :. _ ,..,... J:. - ---- ·-·...... __ ,. __. . ' ' • ., ... 4 .- . ,..,. - ·-· . ..
    • ..: - ' APPROVEDf D ltELEASE 1993 f: t/A HtSTO!iiC!lL -flfV!EW flR6GrWI! _( .... :SE8RET. .' . ( . ., . 30 April 1975 :t.lEt-'lORANDUl-1 FOR THE RECORD William Douglas Paliley SUBJECT: . · .. S~I078 435 .. 1. Subject; a U.S. citizen and former U. S. Ambassador to two Latin American countries, was of interest to the _. Director of the Central Intelligence A en c rca 1952-1954, apparently in connection with en requirements. In 1959 Subject again became o nterest to the Western Hemisphere Division in connect on with the Agency's activities dire·cted against Cuba. At that time Subject ltas an executive '· ith l rivate oration lwliami. Florida. Subject was in ~onnection with WH Di 9. .. . ith h na roups, especially anti-Castro Cuban Cited request from the Chief, WH Division indicated that Subject is a personal friend ~f the then DCI · and that he had cooperated with the Agency in the past. · Subject's _ file also indicates that the th en DCI '-.'as made ah•are of the planned .. . EZ I~lPDET CL BY 062258 ' X
    • .... _ .. _ _.; ,. ( ( g vcn to WH Division representatives. Subject rema ined of interest to the WH Division and to as late as i964. i - . .. • 2 ··· ... ' ' •
    • APPROVED FOR REL£ASE 1993 CIA HISTORICAL REVIEW PROGRAM ... .::. ·: ::. -~:"'. ···- -· ~ : <.: : _.:·.: · .. .... ,;" ~ - . .. .. ; .. -......-.. . . ... . ... ~. . .... ... ..... . ...:: : :::..'-.·. ~,:.~,,.,. , .J.:-...~: ~ ": i :J :·. __._ · ·-;.. • • •• ·• ·• • ::!. :·. ~· :)'; : .•~ · ~ .:--·· · ~, .·. - :, . . :· ; -~ ".: S ...__.._ ..- ~- : : .. ~ :: i : :..: :· -~ :.!. . - ..:: .:.:-. t :· '!: -- v ·: ; . •·.: ·=: : .r..:. a; :. ::. -. .. ;·;<·- : - .. - . . . -·· .. . ·-- . . ., .. .... c - :- ...... _, .·.:.· ··- .... ' ·- :: . ;. t;·: '-. . . :....: : ~c. :· . .......,. . :t.:.:: :.· ~ -· 2. .. )o . ::r.·.:.: ..- ~ :. t. .: ~ ~- : : :.:·. ::. _. . . ; ...- ..-.. - :.· : ·::-:..:. ·. ·:. ~ --:: : .. .. -... ··- : ·:.· i. . . :. : .:; .: ~· i.a:.: ~ -- ~ .:. :: ;:,:;.:. : :... (; ·...:~ '!l.-· :. y .-- ...: : :, -. ')t.-:.~:: ' ::.:- .:. ~-:~ .•rc:. ::: ·· . :..li .: . . . ·. "1 ~ - :! : ~= :.:c!l :.. ..: -..:. ~~~:gf~1i -~~:i n;~~~~#2R·~~;,~t G= co ~;, :.! .·:-:. ; ~ i i :: : ..:::: ~~: '": ~ ~_:;tyPT :7 .. · ....... .. ..• ' ·· l : ~~ ~ = : ~-~ ~~ . ~5 b~ :~ ·) · · ~ ~ :: :..·~:- :c .:c -: : :.· ·.= o f.·.:.! ; c:!,· •.-.:;· . .. . . .::~~:. - : :. .:. -: .~ c . .~ ~ .: .. ,.:.: :!.; ~.:.::::-. :·. ... ... . -.. ..... .. _- - . J . - ,. . . ... . . T ~ ";; . " - .... . .- ...... .. ..... . .. · c_ . -···· .· ._.... ··: :... ·. _: .,r . :.:: 7 ' !!ir . ... : . .a -·~ ~ - ·" .. . : . ·. ·..:::.: - .... ~· ... : . ::·!.-::r-=p.· ~...: ::- .:: :.. '"'.:.: ;· . .:·. ::.::.~:::::::t!.::- we :.· .. : . -..... -:. .. .· : r,!;C y~ .~ '· .:::. :-;· :. - . : . .... ; - 0.3l3
    • .. I ' ., , ,· ~ and cbas t ised by P~*U!Y ·~ outburst and, once· the outburst was over, they quietly excused themselves and left P~y~ o~fice. p~~ st~tad that be hoped that this was the end of the matter, and in retrospect he regretted that he bad indicated to ~ernnda that be l1:1d contributed !u.t~ds to the ·· leader ot tbe Operation ~...r .te3lll. COS •. asked /'IIIM4!!Y to keep hie informed i f there were any further dcvelopcents on this topic, :u1d at the sane. ~ine emphasized ' the poL"lt tllat uncer any and all circumstances t:IA ·~ _ involvement 1n Operation ~-iy,t'r could not be exposed.· P~'~~'-'" indicated that be understood this point expliclty. t!.. • ..::r_. ~~ 1V /,C~,;«eN I Sotf;~t:- 'T '1. > ) -.,,_ . ~. -• --· ! ) _./ 2. Upon tbe cot~pletion of the paragraph 1 conv~rsatton, it wo.s · agreed that PAvu.~.,: would contact C'~.S . p by telephone as soon as be had any information of interest. l£~,1"/tlf~t!·/ -"'.:s.: v"do- -------, Cbie! ot Statton, J~WAVE Distribution: . 1 - COS Chrono 1 - PAu~,~ File .·1 - Op ~~r File
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    • •• .... -· - - ~ ........ .. ·:-: • -~- - -··- 22 May 1963 J l1E:·IORANDU'?.l FOR THE RECORD . SUBJECT: Sovie t Defe c to~s 1. ...On 18 Ap1·il 19 63 : ~ ~o "? . -~-~ - =-=---~]:rE·ce ~ved . a . telephv ne call frof ~UA..-b1.{ l ·;;ho as ;~'J_d if··_. ___ ~-o s ·--~ could vis i +~. A}wu;..{j s off ice in the near future. ~- - _ C..o..S. __l a r;reed to drop into ~LU•.tJ( -~s office _ and me eti&g arrangem6h t s $Cre agreed up on for 1430 hours on 18 Ap1.·il 1963. This meeting s ubseQuent ly took place as scheduled. · PnwLi:-~~ s ·~ arted th2 me e ting by S<jY.ing that he had develop~_<;l - ~- ~~-~at dzal of trust ancl confidence in __ ___ ~9..$ = and as a result. PA-wU:..-r.( } -0 ...... was going to discuss a --~-~_tt~~·- '~b ::..c h · .~UJL(;'"':(_ w ant e d to handle on <m off. the X' €CO!d basis • .· _ (!'o.,$ indica t ed that he would be willing .; ...... . . .. to listen to f'A~ ~ ccmments · on an off the r.ecord basis; howeve r, if the subject ~atter b ~ing disc us sed involved in telligence matters _ -~ e...b..s ·· } would luw~ to r e serve the right t o judge for himself _-· whether tl:e activ ity WC).S or was l~ ot i :1 t ~1 e best interests of either .- US ..6-u; ~1or' _<!.tr'+--C___ ..eo.s. _Jmalie the point that once this decision .. . • ,f_._ . . . ... w~s made he would then have to d e cide whether h e could continue - ·~ ·:::..-:. to treat the rna. tter as an off tl'.e record _rna tter ~r__ yg~_!!1er he wo~tld hr.ve to treat _! t .:as_ an i n tell:i.gence matt e r. :.ffU.Il.k-"""1-indica ted .. · th~i.t he u nde rstood_ eo!? _ _ p o sitjon a.:.1d he was willing to trus t 's ·~·-- e~ S . ) s judgment--o-n t his matter. -~--~~""'"f the n went on to state . { :::hat he had bee n approached on circa 1 6 April 1963 b y :Ir. Jay ·.. Scunvine of the Senate I·nternal Security Committee who had asked . that ~~~ !. ,.participate in an op.e ration which was designed to bring several Soviet military defectors into the Uni t ·e d Sta t~s. Mr. Sourwine indicated tha t the main reason behind his involvement in ,___ .. . _ ..... this op e ration was his desire to obtain the testimony of .the So~iets b e fore the Se nate Intern~l Security Cornmitt~e as soon after their arrival in th e United States as possible. In view . of this ..,_-;.·.. -. .. .. objective Mr. Sourwine was prepared to give 'J PAw~} several blank subpoenas from the Senate Internal Security Committee whichrould ... .· . . be filled out by_.'_ PA·u;c~..fand served on the def e ctors as -~g_o11 .. as · :. .. . :. they came within· the United States three mil e 1 imi t. ~~u.JL...l:1.( cl ·aims ..., .... that he told Mr. Sourw~ne ·that he would be interested~~~ - helping.fn .. .'.....:··. the def ec tion operation as he thought that the surfacing of Soviet military defectors from Cuba in the United States before an open . public forum would contribute to the national security :of the United States.. Armed with this commi tme!1t fro m :.PAWu-~V·Ir. Sourwine ~- · indicated that he would arrang e for th e author, ·Nathaniel _Wyle, to · ~~ ­ visi(eAUJ~ within the ~?;ext few days in order to discus·s the operation in deta.il. .. Mr ~-... Wyle subsequently con tacte -:··>·.<.April and . stated ..· that · h~ itnd his u·n identified associ · · : }:· _oppq~~~:uni t .. · · ·:·f<mr '· iet ,~~li t~ry :. ~ef~e:i~§ii§~~,;~!j~~~&~:t{1;~t~ltE~t ~:· ---:.~"' . ~ · · - --:" ! <::.< . ·.• ;--. -~; • .:·.-;:; :~'·~: •" "-~·. I 'o
    • • <( ;.! :: ... ·, ;..- and three lieutenants from a Soviet SAM missile site. It was Mr.. Wyle!s contention that these Soviets had pictl:Ires. of iutcte·r ground missile storage sites in 9uba. . Q"JJl.k"{, indica t e d th:-.t he would . be glad to participate in this operati6n and would put the . facilities of his organization at the d.isp.Osal of the operation. Ar:r.1ed with this response Mr.'· Wyle suggested that PfUJ~ ' contact John 1iart ino of .:1 ton Road, Mia:rni Beach, Fla. for furt"h~ r d~tails on the operr.tion. At this point {>AwUr::.~ stated that he realized that he was. becoming qu~ckly immersed in .a rather complex operation. As a result . fllo~ decided to call _~n order to discuss the operation with a - C.-.4- re present" ative . .PA-wl.e1' then asked for eo5 ~s advice as to how the Soviet defectors could be brou g ht ·" into the United States and turne d over to the Senate Internal · Security Committee •. C...O' _ .s.· c_o· 2·. ·_ · ·indicat e d that there were essentially three ways in which 4>AWL4:.'1..( _could facilitate the entry of the four defectors into the United States. The first method would be to coordinate all aspects of this operation with .. t.o ~ as __ ~lA -~ s representa- . tive. Under this arrangement the Soviets could be picked up in in-ternational waters at any poin.t designated by ":.hose individuals . who we1,·e exfiltl·ating the Soviets. Once in the custody of e~wL~~ .or a . A- instrum_ nt2.li ty the Soviets could be brought into the e Un ited States under ·._ . ~tA auspices. In this ·connection ·the point was mad e that under s uch an arrangeme nt the Soviets would und ou b-t:edly be transf e rred by air· as soon as possible from Miami to Washington. In Washington the Soviets would be subjected to a thorough debriefing. This debriefing would be designed to establish their bona fides and would include such t.hJng~ ___as a p s ychological assessment and a polygraph examination. · ..' .. _e..o~ made the point that the bon a fides issue was understandably a time cohsuming proce s s and it could take up to thirty days before any arrangemen ts could b e made for making these defector..s__~v:_ai_labl e . to the Internal . Security Committee. At the same tim~ . . ~o~ . made .the point that· this was obviously a topic whi c h was open to disGussion and negotiation as there were no hard and fast rules on this issue. ·In this conn ection_'.~eo5 .'..expressed the opinion that it was imperative that any knowledgeable Soviet defectors with access to missile information be placed in the appropriate intelligence channels and exploited in a professional manne r. ~-~~~ a greed with this but stated that h e felt he had made a commitment to the Internal · Security Comnittee to make the me n available to them in less than thirty days a f ter they exfiltrated Cuba ; As a resulJ .·R~~ wanted to know what were the alternate courses of action . ...· _·_ =_,_,._e_o~ --~pointed out that a second course of ·a ction could be implemente_ . by :-pA..Vii-~~ ·. d and his associates picKing up the Soviets and bringing them - into · the ·united States where they would be turned over to · l ~ ~~ ' 7Y15:ilrL.:V was adyised that i!f_A C.G .<?.;rdanc_ with existing National - ~~curi!Y~.~ ·~-' e Council Directives ~""S would turn ·the defectors· over to ··'· e_ I 11. __~ · ~----t._ 0 ·s- -made thepoint that he did not th~n~- tha~ the ·Internal · ·. ·.. , _._ Security ComJ,!.lj.._'t_t~e subpoenas if .served by__PAw~would ~~ter th:j.s .: · procedur e as ~ ~ 1-l~ would ·retain custody of the · Soviets _under .the .. ('O nccpt that they were screening. them .f · · · · .,;.:':•_ ;,_~.. -· e., ·::~. r _-: ~ ..;. .::· :. ~ :··~~:· :"·~ ": : ., • i·
    • ' ·- ..... ; .. ' . ~. ·f ·- ~ ,._¢1wou l d make the po i nt t hat they had not been admitted to the- u~· 3 . and thus the subpoenas wer e not valid. ~ 05 tstated that under this concept i t was be l ieved that the subpoena would onlv be effective once the Soviets were a dmi t ted to the U. S. At t he same time the poin t was r.1ade that this was ____e...'fJS )'s O.i:)inion, and 1 Rs t he, subpoena issue involved a highly technical po'!.nt of ::.av 1 ~~wlk.~ ·. mi ght be we.:..l advised to have this point checke d by a mere compete nt legal authority than ·e..o5 -f'Au.H.-~ · 1 indicated t hat he did no t like this ~elut i on. As a resu l t he ' . wanted to know if there were any other a l ternate solutions . - -~W( wa s adv:E3d that another alternate solution would be for he ~nd hi s associates to bring the Soviet defectors i nto t he U . S . "black" . Once in .the United St:t.tes t he defectors could be trans ported by air by. fAwlk"( .t o Washington wh ere they could be t urn ed over to the I nternal Security Co~~ittee . The point was made that this solution had its undes i rable aspects because· facilitating the "bl ack" ent r y of aliens into the U . S . would put· PAu;~--y in viol~tion_ of existing U.S . laws . - ~ 0 ~ ventured the opinion that _.(>"vl. ~ could not obtain imnnn:fty from prosecution for the violaticn of these laws through any intercession of the part 9f th e Se nat e Internal Security Committ ee . At thi s point Pfl-tYW-( stated th~t it was obvious that his only course of action wa~ to cdoperate fully wi th' ~~7 . }as C...k ' s official repre·sentative . .. :. ..·. ..... ~ ..-·······: ~-: :;~ :·-..} f.~ ,. .:. - ... ...,,. ·;, · .'. ··: ... .. -- .._ -,.. •' . ·:. ..-.. ·. ~~/ : 3 . OncE' · pt'u)-~ r ea~hed the d e cisi on that he had no a l ter n ative .e xcept to cooperate with __e-tA -.~ he asked if :.: . e. o s J coul d make a co n~itment to the effect that once the So v iets were brought into the U. s . they would be t1_:1:;-ned over to the Internal Security Committ ee wi t'hin 36 hours . · <!...o > . ~stated that _he wa.$. not in a pos ition to make this kind of a conuni t~ne nt OP. _ C!!-111- s behalf. · Q~w~ [ then su ggeste d that he call Mr . Sourwine and indicate thl t ·. while VAwl.-1.;.( was prepared to p a rt i cipate .in the o_ peratioq. he had a s c e rtai ned that the onl y way to le ga l l y brin~ the defectors into the U . S. und e r secure conditi011s was to .cooperate with ---c...iA- .. ~~- the n i ndicated . 't l~at if .Mr . Sourwine would agree to cooperat·.e with . C!_A- then' Pewu~'""i ~'tou l d continue to pursue _ t_he _op~ration . ·' - - ~~ - _Mr . Sourwine wou l d ndt agree ·to cooperat.e_ w_:tt.h_ ~ - - e-1 A then P-Au.-~ ;.y would withdraw from the venture • .: (!..O "S indicated that ~e.Jel~ that this position was eminently sound. At that p oint f'AuAk-1( contacted .Mr . Sourwine in _Jtas)1ington b y t elephon e . At the end 2.!.. . th~_ t e l e phone discussion -~~ h a "(l _~-~~nv.~n ce d Mr . Sourwine tha !._P~w~~"i c<?uld work su~cessfu ll y with ~ <=::-tA 011 the oper~_tion_ . . .. In v1 e w of thJ.s Mr. Sounnne agree·d to h~ve :P~u.iU:-<1 contact ·., ~ /14 .) At the. same t ime Mt..~- - Sourwin e asked th at _ PtWU..""'{ attempt to ·obtai n a conun~tm_ent from... ~ lt?t- that the defectors would be made avail able to- the Inte rnal Se_ cur.i tv __CQI_!!!ni t t ee within 36 hours after t hey had arrived in the U. s. - ~~~a greed to try to obtain such a commit ment but he mad e no 'prdm.ises that h e could obtain such a commi tment • . . .;_. ~ - . : ., ~ --· -- ~ · - . .fl~~~ter. obtaining Mr. Sou.rwi.ne's permission -to cooperate with :__ lA . _ C.. McJJL.e{ asked _h_:?w he should procee d with th_ implementat:i,on c e of th e operation. . ~o 5~sug;:!:9s ted that the best way o:f bandling the operation woufd -be for - :- 0 '5 to outline the information c... c u1-reti_ tly at hand ·to his H~Tidqua i·t<:trs . Once .this was done ._,£i:·wu=---;-.,l '-~y would probably be well adv~sed to persona~ly _ contac 6 AI-=jl= or ..:>: ~_ •:; -,.;;:-~--~~~:rc:-rcr.!i/.~~~tf { ··· · !'c'lJ.i,::. '" ·· · ·
    • . ., •.. . . ,· • ,,. ·. :... - ... ~~::~t ,, ~ ·· ...:0 lj)C-( in ord e r to obtair.~ firm commi-tments rel~tive to the . period c f time wh ic.h would elapse between the Sov~ets' ent~y ~nto the u. s. and their referral to the Inte~nal Security - Committee. ~AwU:;'""( thought this ov~r fo-r several m~nutes and then stated that · he would prefer to cont:act __ ~ ~.L) c. 1 ~rect~y and not have any record of this t r anf:iact ::on in normal (!.I A 1 cable channels. __ <!. 0 s ~ c ould n.o.t dissuade . ~A-w~""( , f ror,1 this dec is ion. As a result PAw~'¥ P laced a long d istan~e telephone_ call to ... D fDC( _j _ This· t -elephone call did not produce a direct contact with :.~-.. -_D oc./ as . ~e was. out of his offic-e. _PA""~- then ~ade arrangements to talk tc 0 .P C...l) at a later t~me on 18 Apr1l 1963 • . -·-· . . . 5. Once it wa·s .clear thatP('W~-1( could not reach _ D loci .. J __ by tel eph o ne "i'.' C...u S attempted to pres s for addi tiona! details relativ e to tlic defection operation. In this connection C..OS' J asked what ,rQIw~"'< knew about John Martino. rAwU,;.""'{'1 stated -that he knew noth i ng about him but he was under the - impression that Martino was in some way involved in acting .as the middleman between the Cub an underground in Cuba and Wyle who was the U. S. front man for the transaction. e:. o 5 · then ·suggeste d that ~'Awlk.~ contact · Martino and obtain all of the available information on the operation from Martino. In this connection _ . e..o~ stated that .Martino was known to c...i·'A- and that availabl_ information indicated that Martino e had spent "some t L11e in Cuban prisons and could at best · }?e described as an uns::l.Vory character. In this same context _. <!...o s _ pointed . out that Martino had pre viousl y claimed to have leads but none of these had ever been subst~n~iated . once they were put to the test of producing reslllts. J'c-hu~A...""( then agreed to contact Martino. - ?Aw.k."'( telephoned Martino at his r e sidence at approximately 1540 · hours on 18 April and made arrangeme!'ltS for Martino to visit piluJL:b."-t.( 1 at his residenc e at 1700 hours on 18 April. .. . ; __ · ::_.:·.. r· -< .. . ··..·. .~":: ·:~g,;H ~~v~J~ ;:if -=-s~: -~§::!£~ ;~;:~ ;:.~~~;.'"!"~' ~ .~~ ;~:. - ... :..· ·~- -~~;~~j 6. At approximateiy 1930 hours on 18 April 1963··- pA-W~~ contacted ~~ ~ "'!> 1by telephone ... ~n~ stated that he had. just finished a me~t_i!1s with 1!artino. ~AUIL.b"{stated that he was impressed with ...... -~9_5 . accura_!:e _si'!.?.-l' _ cterization of Martino, · L . e., he was an a ·{~ e:..o- )::{~-;! ·: . . ~S1 ._..-;~.-·~:-:_.-·~·:.~-:.F·~_·.:,~_·l- ~-~point three miles off of Mangrove Key which was located north of ~~~o~~r~~:~i~~;~'%~~t~~~ .;~~; ~~v~~t:a~o~~~tb:s d!~i~.~~e~o~o a .. Grand Bahama . Martino indicated that the four Soveits had - been AWOL for some time and they were currently in hiding in Oriente Province . Martino stated that two men "from the Cuban underground would brin g the d e fectors to the Mangrove Key area. It was · Martino's content ion t'ha t the two Cubans had access· to a _ 40 foot . speed boat and it had plenty of gas which would enable . them to . come from Cuba to the Mangrove Key area. Martino indicated ·that he had . a secure means of conununications with Cuba, but he would not identify · 'thi3 system. Martino did claim that it would take about . a week or · ten days for the exfil tration .to be completed. · .· In view ·o f this .. }/<~;} .... -·'· · .X-~:~:.· '~· ·::. .-~?~ --~~~~·:,: ·:"1;:~~4 _···~~~I~ ·. . :.:~ :_~-~:_.-:·~·.:.,;-:·._ .-~-~' :-~ ~~~ -~ 1··:"·, · .. .;··'~ ·;;oey;: ~· ., · f act odrbiIarttinoda.!lticipta~;f.w ~~ if 2 a 11 we n tA we~1 . ~he _dte~ector s -:/·~··,_ · ·:t. . c u e. urne over o 1 ,~ ...::o 1• on 9 . <;>~ 3 0 . pr_ ~ ..,. 1 . _1~0 a s~ -:.:~i<·:· .··~J:::.: :. ··· stated tnat he . would know 24 hours in advance wh def·e c -:c·. "'· ~. r ··:.·. were to be delivered .to .~he 'Mangrove Key . laimsi 1 0 1 ~~,~.·,tg_ld l~r!_in?,;c!:!'." t, he· ' ld . · .... · · ·. .•;:.··.. ·..-J ;.-- r"~~~~~7~f:~r-I.Mi~~~i:~,i~~~~~~::;:·;?':<~;;:·:-?:~~~fJliiil;liriil ._ . . • . ~~;' , ~~·,c·- •"'·- (.. f.·.-~.,....,, , .······ . . . - . .·{,···; .::. ,;~·..::,-::.,:.1-:~t~~i:<···:: •, :'"-~.'h..&...~1111'1~· . _ 1 ·
    • IICW.Y£tl ..P ~-'# ·-------'' ,J .. ·•.·.-· -- •' off of Thlangrove Key in lt>LJ1k'{ :o; boat. At the same time. PA lJ-ILE'< ·, ou1:lined to 11artino those precautions that he would take in order to prevent his being sucked into a trap. These' precautionS' would include a:!.'ming the c1·ew on ~wl-t:."'f~S bo2.t. In additim1, PA~"-( _r:-:.::>.nned to fly over the area prior to authorizi21g his boat to · pic.k up the defectors. PJtWL-t,~ claims that_ ~lartino was impressed with these precautions. Maitiho indicated, however, that he felt that the":e w::ts 1'-0 need to fear a trap. !Ylartino told P?J-UJ/k"'(, that the Cubans feared that C:.. 1 A- and the U. S. Coast Guard might trap them ::>.nd as a res1.el t. their cinly_ concern· -,vas to deliver the defectors safely to the West ancl then return to Cuba. PALVL-b"f'1 also reported that ·he had lear:1ed that a lllrs. Lapham,, a reporter fola newspaper in Fort Lauderdale, was :also involved· in the operation. c.'~.U~"-(1. asked M:u-tino to have Mrs. Lapham contact Pfll<-'Lk} in order to·fill him in on what she knew of the operation. Martino ag-reed . to do so and he then parted company with f'-AlVu;;'( ~:·: .' . ·... ,;--· .· -.- .:.-. 7. In the telephone conversation at circa 1930 hours on 18 April 'AwU-"'(',advised · ~05 that PAlVLEyl,had talked with j ) (.PC( in the afternoon of 18 April. This conversation had produced .J;J DC(~seorr.ments tl:at he ':'as pleas~d that ~fWL6--ywas co-_ - operat2ng Wl th <::..o s as thas would lnsure tnat _the operat2on would receive· p~·?p_er intelligence guidance. fAwU:::-~ cl:?-ims that he then told D 0 Cl that c_ o 5 had wanted to put tte operation into normal cmr,;nun:lcati0l1S channels but that Plw~.-<.o"{ had insisted __ that t!1e case be discussed with _ D 1 D c. 1 ~by telephone. It is Pp,wL~ s contention that D DC( did 1iot object to the operation br,ing handled out of normal cha:wels _ ~w lb'C, claims that he discussed with __ :> ) (__ ( ?ilr. -Sourwii1e 's in i:erest in obtaining access to the defectors wi~hin 36 hours after they arrived in the U. S. __---_~Do<:-( is alJ,eged :to have said that he saw no objection to this; however, . .:t> n c. (planned to. discuss this matter with -- --;:__ prior tc making any corn;nit!":ent on this matter. At the same tirae ---~ l-Pc/ ~_indicated to rAI.VL.h~ that if such a ccimmi tment was made -·and subsequent debriefing of the defectors indicated that they had vital intelligence of major importance to the U. S., then --- ·e_l (.-would contact the Chairman of the Senate Internal Security ---:committee and attempt to obtain .his cooperation in postponing the s:J.:rfacing of the defectors. This caveat was apparently agreeable to PA~~ ari_c!_ __tl_1~ __matter was left with the conuni_tment being ob~ __ _ tained from . D 'D G (that he would d:i.scuss this matter with .' _~ and c;ontact-_(1{UI.k-~bY telephone in the_ near futur~- -['ALUtb~ claims that_ '0 (J q also told PAUJLe{ to advJ..se ____ e..o~?-=l.n.2:t___to make a _ rc_cord 0 1_ this operat~on tmtil further notice. _. --~(;)?_]indicated tc:' ~t.-bo'ithat he was not forwarding <my communications on this operation to his Headquc.rters and would not do so until furthel' guidance was received from ~:·'-:()' It was on this note that the telephone conversation ended. ' D_c__
    • .. - t - -...----·--· - - --- - --- - - 1' . ' ; :_ _. ,. ,. ' • • u ! .. ··"' (,. _ !""•"' . ·_:" - . ~- ,, ..1 . ·. ~. .... ··- .- ·;-... l --'·- .. _- . a story . In this connection P~wUc:.~·.. sta ted that he had learned from Mrs . Lapham that an individual b y the name of FN.U Bayo was appa;.,·ently involved in the operation. P~~ ' 1 did not- know what . role he played in the operation but Mrs.Lapham had mentioned the name apparently on the assumptioa that ~_:-'1' was already informed r e lative to the role ·.of Bayo. ~.Aw~·:~C. stated that he thought that Bayo was a Cuban but he was not certain. 9. In a tel eP,h.one conversation with ~--~.?_2 at 1500 hours on 19 April P.A~"< .stated that he had received a telephone call fl·oD). 1Ir . Wyle ·-durin g the late mo.rning of 19 April . In this conv ersation C(t:~JJ1...1c"'i ,_ a dvised r.Ir . Wyle of (JAu;U;..''f s discussions with Sourwine-- and D t:> (..( Init ially this in £iria t e d lllr . Wyle as he claimed that he did not want to cooperate with · e..-1 ()r-.. and as this was his ope1·a tion he was incensed that Mr. Sourwihe had made a decision on this operation without consulting Mr. Wyle. Aft e r dis cuss ing the relative merits of the case for some time . fAu.n-~ 6laims that h e convinced Wyle that the operation was now on a · sound footing and there was no al terna ti ve but to _ ooperate with c C- (>r ~Ir. Wyle appareritl:y ultimately accepted this position . and premised to k ee p ~ flOL~~in fo rmed on a 11 deve lopments i n th e operation. jAI..I)'I..b""< i n turn adv isec. ~ o '7 that he would keep - e._ o? i n ormed on all developments . ;. -· • _,.. ""f' ·.-_i • •• "'1 1 -- .. -·- - - · Chi ef of Station - · ~ ·--·- ·- -·l '• l " Dis tribU1: ion: , . ,tW i,k-~.f-, ::-L l..Le ...-0 r1g. 0 1: COS Chrono ·-..··_.;;. - . ' r .-, ... 1 . '• -. ·~;. . ..... . :~· . .. ~ ·; . - -
    • .. . .. -~· " . ( ·.· ;. ' . '· ~· . ... i l . .. ~ ·.. ·- • ~ s p ll'l · --~ f)~ D ,. .·.-" t.~ '· ll .... / "' ~ u ll Chief, Special Affairs Staff XX . J . J.~ : "lt1 I i ~~~ I ~ .: . : :: -· - t~:l.J••• fl~ ·.o~[D . (!l' (;l iW:l:O t!lA::(; ':I.A-lU~ • . . t;l ·· C~ I.,,~ · !: ' ~' IK~ ( l : .. ~ ~ -- ..... :, t· /·/ .. . F'RO:£S~H ; (O S-E Ct!l ~~ J~ Ut I~:OI"G .':."S..-x.:·,_.·. j I ' - / - -E-T ~& f! ~ '-">· : .; - ..: . - ~ AUH.lCJ Chief of Station~ J~lWAVE .. ; rt · ~~IIUf · .·~ .· -- -' . - ·~~.Y(!I ppcra t1onal Periodic Activities Report. on J!llWAVE's Relationship with .1!;1f'WI-EY .. ~ ~;j~.·· · .. 1~_.... --------------------------------------------------------~~--~------~------------ .. ·-"" P.EQUIRU) • RULf'U.CU ACTIO~ REQUIRED ·: None, for your information, .. i . ."f:.· . ~ .I . . ,• ~- . 1. IXTRODL'CT IO~. . . ... C 4 _3 . ..J was initially introduce d ::.-: to ... /!Atv4fn,on. 2B Au gust 1962. This introduction took place at :•...·f.l~i,#.t~i .·~ p.liami off ice and it was· carried out in order that -~ ._- might obtain some background information on com:nercial ~:: . maritime ~ctivities in the Caribbean. This ~ackgroun inform a tion . ... was needed for. the preparation of .r..tWA 'E 1 s comments and rec om.'n end <>. -·.'.:.. ·.. ·.. tions rc:l.a ti v~ to the .<!~y~ con_ cept. l'_,~t.~Y ~vas most respons i v.e ·to ~" .s _} reque st for background information on cOJ:'l."•Wrcial rn~u:ltime matters in the Caribbean. Some of ·.~~~t~t~UN'~ s u ggest i ons · :::·. ·. · VCl'e sul>scquently it1co1•po1·ated into J!1...~ 1 5 Pl" oposals l'elative ··· to the e~r~rl ccnccpt.. As a result of the initial me.e ting h e t v•eer. ····· t>A~.CJI..II''t ) n.nd c d ..3 ~ a relationship has developed in. wh l.ch~ /IA.vt..8Y · as a well-informed businessman with e xcellent conn e ctio n s In ·- · · ._..- ...... . the ~liruni community has been used as a special contact for the . -devel o pment of certain background qata, operational intellig ence ··Jt·.· ·.. · and the conduct of operational support tasks.. In th0 p.e riod . · . ..- · 28 August 1962 to 25 July 1963,. P.f"'.LLY )has shown himself to he ··<·, ... . a di s creet loyal American who iS · intcro.sted in helping his country ~. solve those problems wfiicll it faces in the Western Hemisphere, ~ ~i'_~W!~.~e-y fis n.nd will always continue to be an indepe~dent indivi.dual .;~ ..!~· ;·ho will be friendly to C./A } -nnd 1 as ti. i·csul t 1 is c rq) n.l..>l c o'f giving · ·e,;,f a critical but well-intentioned appraisa.l .. of J~t'AV£ 1 !7-i~i' .. ir.tag c · in the !11 i a:ni are a.. As n. special c6nto.ct 1 : f~.~~~lis a he lpft 1'·~·· · .. reference point who can be harnessed on cc1·tain ·occasions to. ... carry out tasks which are of intel'est to JMWAVE. It i.s believed ::~:: .. ~:. '-· . .~ :)~.~· ... .. - .··· :··· -.. : .·~~t.:~~ . . (CO!i'rlNUED) -'"'·."-...,_... .. ·- , . ., ~-.:..i; ,;..,. - ·-- -..... IP.~ • --~,·~ ~. .......-......,_. . . t~· • ' • • ' ·. _ • • ..:·.... ·.: :· ··:·;.~.!.!r:r.~::.:</ ·/;;~:/ ... • # -· . .... .: ' ,· - ~·- ,' . . .. .. ·. .- . .. _,... . • , -· ' . . . .. . ... . ~ •': J • -~ • • •
    • ,.--, .. .'. ( t.il J!.l't.A'1;; 1 ::; con t.n.c t Wl flAw/41 col, 1.-l."l.Lu l.v:::. lo LLc iu 1.:: ill:.,t,;ll t of the ovorall.J~.!'A'E misSiilJn. In vic:.:w· oi ; th~s, a pc:.:1·iodic activities report is twin~ Huhrdttc·d l'C.·hardinl-{ the nature of J~I'.-'E:s l'elationship with -~~~..,, duriut,f ttw pc:.:ri<Jd 2~ August l9G2 to 25 July 1963. tlH t; . . • :>. .. "··. · ' • 2. 9PER: TIO~ .. t. SUPPORT. On occasion 1 it has been possible to use _f'Awl~~~ !backt;round l;nowledge on Cuba as a reference point . for the acquisition of operatidnaJ. intelligence and/or personality assessments. In a.ddi t ion 1 P'f.~l~- I has in some instances l.Jecn used to carry out operational support tasks for J~WAVE. These tasks are recorded in the cor:unents· :which' follow: a.. Assessment of ~~~«,.;-- I When J)tWAVE v;as lookin~ for a sponsor for the ~YH l project 1 it became apparent that _/lt:::E.ur J might be an ideal contact to ~er~e as our att.ribution source. In view of this, inquiries were made among J:.:WAVE assets in an attempt to obtain a . detailed assessment of ')/~Nr., ! The prcl iminar>· results· of our inquiyie~ reyealed. that P.~wJ-c.t·.J wns a long-time intimate friend of ;.,~ _t~-~'.. /As a result 1 .. - - ~"_,::)asked, f?Atut.EY · for an asscssmen t of If~ / Additionally, f>Awi-41J ·;'w as- asked for an assessment of · the probability that ./l&.:e4C4't· would agree to · 'cooperate in a clandestine venture with · u. S.·G· -~ l'if~~.Jl.IE'I I urn i shed as assessment of ! :li-~e~T and gave ~_(.':, ·ran appr~isal which indicated that lk:e~-r )would not cooperate with V-'G in a clandestirC venture. This assessment was outlined in W~ y·E 1008 1 dated 10 .October 1962. This assessment was ·useful in preparing the groundwork for J~l!AVE 's... eveQtua~ aoorqach to IJ~~r . but it ·-~ was .not entirely accurate, since _-__(!4.:5.. __.twas subsequently · :.-:; . successful in recruiting A"'4.c,7- ·•to -participate in the <:~y,oT proj cc; -- . b;· ·_·- ·;:~e;~ .v-r . ). ··p;1:wi"tiii ~1elped ransa"~ . -',4--;5~-<.rT' i out of the ·· -.· Cuoan prison in ••·hich he ·had bdcri placed as a result of his partici- ,_ · ; pa tion in Brigade 250G 's invas:j..on of Cuba. ·/';'f_W/-<Af ··: has a very warn · and clos-e personal relationship t~ '"jf~-~~..,- ~This-relationship ·=·-· . resembles a !a thor P.t:ld ~op - f~la tionsh-ip and· it is of l<:>ng standing • As a resul~j when _fi-~~~1,?-· returned to the ·United Sta.t.cs fr.om Cuba~ rpAt4JJ-t.v )was instrumental i _ arranging f9!.. _:1l'AYE to debrief n J .... ··:. /10-eo~.~T _ )on those I!iem!lers · of Briga~e 2506 who verc still in prison. -·· · This debriefing· material stood J~1lWA'E in good stead a-t such tine as Brigade 2506 was ransomed it December 1962 and 'J~!WAVE was· asked ·~;;.,-;._.. by - ·tAr~ !an,d ···f:BI -- }fo provide CI trace matcri~l o:~ ~11 l3l·ig:H.;c _,_. :. retul.;nces · who entered thQ _ United States. Since the initial . .,~~~introduction to _--~~~~..,. '~, .he· ·has been used by J):WA~~ a~---~n occasio;·<·- · source of _ intelligence ·o n exile politics 1 tl:c Cuban .. -·· ttrade and .. the -··;··---:-- ·(!iJiJ/.d 1'/'t."'( .,.·c..:o:,. ) In additi. n, -~~~t:~Vr _~ has recently be~~~ ···•'--. o prevailed upqn to· se·l~ ;9 as the president of one of the corpo rations ·.(.:_. which will provide coveJ;_ -····· .. .. ::?~ ..-:. • :' • • ".1 • 1 '·· • . · · c. · -:-<!J!.~i:l Car~o. Afte1· tho -&-r~1.:J corporation was ·_ :/~~-E' established a.nd in the ~ni_t al period .. when .J)lWAVE. ·wn.s ati;cmptiJlg- .. ·.. ;:·---;:-; to build a soli for th<' -- 'tw.:'s · - --~ ­ ../instrumental ·- . ... ..I
    • . '• i -lC~ :-: t - · ••• ·- - - - - - ·· J ·-- .• . ·· - ··-···· .•. • .• . · - - ---· -···· •.. - · - - ·· •• ;.,p0ratiurl41 intc·lli~~cnce on the nctivities of iudivith.Jal~ and t : r~•.Jp <-· . .-: ~o : ch 4S 1 C;~rlCJ::i PH!O, ::~tonic• :•!:".Cl:O, .~V;I'T _! Gu::i":II.V Cl;l·:H'0 Ht!bi'J~ . .:.; uL.iuJ.·n;z :.;L;,(J)"0 1 'f(,;ny (;L'J:.::>T: and l'C:p~·cse:utati. '(: S of til<.• !.:nP. TiJis in1orr:-.aticm· has lwen hl<:nded into that inforr::ation obtained iror.t other J!.lWAVE source:s twd j t has cou tl- i lm tc:d to ou1· co!:~pus i te: . understanding of exile affairs. -. c. J:;~c!:r!round Information on ~.i~>.J~. i Bu s i : ~css PC'rson ~ litic: s . is ::;ti.il a.ctive financially in seve:ral :n . u.li cor::panics. During the period covered bv this report he divested hil:-.self of his interest in t:d~-"1~Y . I This sale was m:-~ctn for 8_~,;q~~.r ' .s a result of this :t.nd other transactions, PAf4.11U, .!is well informed on the strong points 1 -v,·ea}~nesses and, ~Jencral Orientation of most ~-~-· of the leading busi.ness personal! tics in the ~:iami area. His ~ .. . appraisals of so1:1C of the individuals has been helpful in planning ~~~· various approaches to business leaders in whom J~lWAVE had an interest&~~­ : . C c::J . . ~ inquiries about . these. business personal i tics h~ve been :'r masked s~ . that it is doubtful that·~~ is ".ware of t~1ose individuaf . in whom .. :___ t:!f!J1 ~~s had a special operational interest. . .. · · . ~ .• ~r;1w~ (·· 3. OPERATIC~~~'/~ ; On J,.8" J~pril ' 1963 1 f.,fi.V/~ I started a series Of diSCUSSiO.I.l? .~· · i th ~.S rwhich Ultimately led to the mounting :~ of Operation t!~l't'. · This operation is described in detail in .. h'r VE 9342 1 • dated 5 June 19G3 ." In summary 1 this operation involved .,,.~ the infiltration. into the northern· coast of ·oi·iente of ten Cuban ·.; exiles who claimed that th9y could . go into Cuba - ~nd ef':~_Jl tJ:.~!l-j:c_ ·· t~ .. I four Soviet .officers who were .knowledgeable of Soviet missile !~ . ~ ~.C:f~y_(f.f~§~~:i._~~Q.:~:·.Aq.~_t.~..!.. ·'01i.s...9.P~.l~~-ti_on invol v~~ · a·ri" ·-ocia-·:issortmen t ~ ~- ~of bedfellows 1 .s _ ch as, IJr. Jay So~l~,•..·~.f1e._o"f'" the SE.:-na te Internal u ·, · . Security Committee, ..~;:a:t.banj._~l . Yi.e.>:.lt author, ;l.~~)l)_.}_l~_RB~~ s m all-ti m e }:~ · ·· gangster 1 Life magazine 1 and P~wl~ ..I Operation u~ was launched on 9 . ~tne 1963 with a l~rge amount of a~sistnnce from J~WAVE. ~The infiltrees did not rpturn from -the infiltration ondr~tion as ,·scheduled on 10 1 11 or 12 June -1963. Subsequent devclopr.:e nts .:;~~--· rev~a1cd that the ten-ma11 team which was infiltrated was part of ~ :·the invasion · force which the l'tunp CRC announced on 20 Jme 19G3 p ;; • . t:h~t they hn.d infiltrated into Cuba. It would. apjJenr lin retrospect ..... that the ten Cubans who went into Cuba on Ope_ ration ~'lilT' did not . .. . · · have any Soviet contacts. but ··thcy. dreatncd these contacts up in · · =.:-,.,:. · ~ or del•-· to f i~J:i an ~ngel who woltld fac·il1 tate-· thei.r infil t1·at ion . .;. ; · into Cuba. Their plan wo~·ked and they -~_icL.~!~Sl.-!~!!...~!l~.~:£, i .·e. L·1~w~~'7r L~-~~-!!}~g~-~.J..-~~, Sourwine and a - ~~!·~.J1~.!.P!.!1_g_J!rl:!!.~_.:f~'Q_r._l_- .. Cl)# f.. D~ spi t :.-~·- · !·;·'. thi·s, Operation t!4'.Pr/has to be viewed · as a long shot taq~ 0t of :;t<:'. opportuni t:r which neither J~li'AVE nor _ (! lA . .l could refuse to pursue ~·~~~ ··· becnus94 . had there beet; a.n oxfiltration of four So'icts, we would .. ha·o lfnd a. veri table gold mine .9:! current · intelligence on Cuba.· ······· J~IWAVE's aualys~s of Operation .~,trhjis contained in WAYE 0 •138, '... ·:::f.:··.·· ··~·~ ·. . dated 28 June 19G3. " · · .!;i;(:. /)Affii.Af ··y .: . I ~ ,. .. · :._~_ ; ·_ · OP~~TI<)~AL INTELLIGE~CE . O)i ..... ~ ~ CdiW~l ·~p~~ c~~lt::t.ctcd --~~~;.=: · . ·: )CZo.s l by t<Hcphone on lti May 1963 aud asl<ed ··- ~ ... j for an · . · ·.~:~-... ·. : .. · · _ ~·:fnunedia.te mcet·ing in order ·'Ula.t there might be- a : di.scussion of the ·.: :~:r:· ·· · : ..... .- '.i.'-::-(f,gi~.f4 'situation. The l'equcsted.· m~otin~ -t;o_ ol<<plt_gg d~n:in~ the .- · . --:-:--_.. :·. :-evonih{; oJ: lG May· ~-l:!H>3 nnd _i:t!;,JU.~~ l~.f~l·nod . ~bert f~~.J-~~~.l . l.>~cn ..;·=--~:=: :-:·:~~~'!:Y'· , ·.}~.. ;. asked fOl' !lis .~_vl_q~v-~_;J:m tho . . : ~A;;l~itu:--.tion by. :ftic= ~P-~~·!J;=. l _ _:;k,.;· ·= ~4.-;t.~·: l) _ ' · · ·..;:; ·... . "i ow· .. 9f th 1~, · -~ :.Jwn.s,...~obl'lotod; QXt&."~nsivoly""}•qn :..t~lO· ·. ;t.~4'CI~t"--,1 :%:···· ·· ...:~~-ti~t:;,, . · : ·- ··· problem ·nnd his vi<.'WS ·re'g.: rdillf1. u.s. policy considerations relative -~ to . ~~.;.,l Wcl'C. forwarded to Hc<Hlqu_ al'tCl'S in. . w~ VE .§.u:_ __ , -~!I~tcu q . :.c.. . .. : --:::t.i:: 20 Mny 1 ?G3. As •tl 1f. P:l.l9~~~~r..~'J.1~ff~9·;~~J~"''·~ ~~+li.'3.f;~,~~.~PJ~i~·.,p.;fM:I~~··~ ,~:,.fl;;l;t,.~~ · iit<B:.:r.~~'J::!.~·=~­ --:ho cl<:hr ici in~ o:r his · Am~~.t<.~_:_l!:.:_U_ua~~ ., con tt.u!·t~rt.ttW~ff.!!~l; ··l~.t-··t ;::.-:~~p.u~J d ~ri n ~~ 1:h<' IIC'i;~ h t: oJ th'-' ..• ~~ur..c:y~rJ.::?JS ~: .One · :~ ~.: o I" tlll.~fW d<'hl'.l('J in:~;:; Wt:-·1 n t l't'nd<HI hr .. ~ } __ 1 th _.! :-; dc:a,lJ ~~~:_.l~_.i:. n :L .. _ ·'· . ::_1~~: l'(.n:.;ul Lud .i.n in ·! 't!!-'llll t; .i..911w LH' i I1L, o_ ta 1 tw_ J rom ____ ....~.:.:5 ~ u _ !<! ~.... ·------· ·- - _ _ ~ .:. b d A rl·c-:::tc(t'nt i.lf 1 'd£2f¥'il?_IID._ '1'!•0 dt~~- ai_l : : l?.:: - ~~ · i:' c:dJJ ·.l..:'i.· ... .....·: :::_. • ::c!:C forw :u·d'"•d in )'.'A'I~_J,~i-~;1 •. dat'-•d 20 1!;y 10.i:"l~~-~;,~/~ j,,._:-; _H_Ull!-i ~.a · ·· .. <}i.WI tl.y nllv i ~Nl ll~· '!.:..~J./Jt:,.Z 7t.hn t; it!' v ic,ws nnL":d.ll~~ ·-Wt''~ appr~..,~,-,;_~~~ . !a:.~-.·:~''t'l' 1 11.."' _ tH.·t~~.t "'-' ·~ ·::~ tal(: .- ~lny ft1 · av ~ i.uu oil I h.' <!, .... , /t:ia t;l.: ·. • · .··~·,. !;.: a 1 Jill :..._:.:..:.;·~; ~-~·;._':_;; ~-' ~;~~;!_~~i)< .:.·:;:::· .. . .. ~-~-.':;~/:~:~:'·;~' .'·.- ·1;.· ;::t;·'· .l .. ,-::'+i_.'lf".:§oo;.:.
    • .. -- ... ------- . ---- ... , ·s·~ . -_,·.·r.. :: . ~r-.:~}·~~~- .. • ••• • ·- !!> ·----·-·-· . . '· ... . 1·-.-··.·--·---"-·........ · : . • .. - ·- ....------·- ... .. .. . • ,' ~ • : ;. 0 • I . ··--·---·---··- .. ·--··-···- - ---· .....-----·-··-· ' r,, _P.'*W.'=-~~ · Pi',' rrrolns. PAIAII~ ·. is nut in ;-t.L:l ' CC!~I:rlt :;ltll tile· ol ~'n:s l~<k-i'i'l:'"-t~cnl•ed;; on ::::l~t(:r~ u11<.:c.:tin:~ ll:c h - ~~ ·:.·· Ad :: ini~tr?lftvn t: ,. ~· • c:- • •., p'· r· i .. 1 c:., .,.., '" · .. .. . _ ,_.~ ~c,~ •-.; .. ,.. • ~ .... ._..:..' .... +o C·............. ,..,. ......, . . Cr"'a, .. .-,,,,,...,... .., ·'·"" ""' ... ,... - · ·. ""' . ... • . ... • .• .. .... ,.,.:: • ,,1.,. •.. ..,. .... /~ • ~ I <:n~ ~t;.; <.:5 in pl'0pa~:.:>.nr.b.·acti'itic~ CJi his ()','.11 which arc: c.Jusi~ncd to Jn·in~ il:c· CuiJan i~stic· at;d . PAwiC4.f'-' <..!i:=:a~-'TC:c- .. 1'1-WJL.eY' occasionally mcnt with Prc:sidc:nt Kunnc:dy's Ad:.)inistr::.tion t() the atlc:nliun 01 the U.s. public. Sar:1pics of thj s one-r-:<1.11 PW ca:~. pa.i~n ca.n he fou1 ~<.! in tho att~ched c:-:ccrpts fro::1 the !.1i~.:i Herald of 4 ~ovcnbcr 1952 and 8 Dcccmbr:1' l !IG2. In aLlc..!i tiQn 1 /)AWI""'f ' l.~ an aviLl lcntc:r wri tel' to indivJd~l:~ls tln·ou~hout the United St~Lcs Q;~ :tny anc.l all issues which affc.:c"t United States socurity. In this connection, on 22 ?·lay 1963 1 PAwl~·, wrote a. letter t .o . ~.tr. Harold Jla.ycs, ~.!an aging Editor of Esquire rna:;azinc, in which f'~wl~ · took Esquire to task for the cover which they had used on their June 1963 c~ition. The cover of the :Esquire of June 1963 and a feature story which was carried in that edition was less than cor..pl i1ncntnry to C.l-'1 and (JAW/e.., . took exception to the story as well as to the cover. 6. FIELD COl~EST. · Periodic ·contacts will be maintained with lin the iuturc. These contacts will continue t .o cover the f;C:: . subject matter which has been reported on in proceeding paragraphs. At oppol·tune times 1 peri?dic progress reports will be for'.':i:l.rdcd on the acti'itics of PAWUY. and his role as a special contact of Station J~l'AVE,· .. . '' .. p,.'-111~ . ,~ ... E.'iD OF DISPATCH ... :. '• , ····. . .. ' ' ' ' ·· - ..' . • • ~ 0 .,.,. " . ' ' .... . . . , ,• ' • I ______ _..._,. ' . l ' ',' .. z,: .. .. ' I '• ~· ' o .:. ~-- .·:··....... ,. . - .· , o''"',"~; • .:· . ·.• . ;, • ' .... . .· .- '• : . t•. ;~~ ... ·.~. :.~k~?~~ ~ ••.. o · •• , ; _ . .• . . : • .•. --·:·:·~-·o. ~ ::-. . -. ..,,.__ . ... . ·'",-'· : : ?-_-_._ · ....,>=-; ...; ·· •. ' ~ • 'o , ~:~~;;.-, . ·-~..,...- ~ • . . . 0 • ~ ,. --.,....., .' .. ... , _. . .. •• . • j' -. .... -·.·-. .·-·--·...·,'"'- . .·-.. . - _ . . .. . ... ..., "· -- ~.~-- ' ~. ·,,.,~r~:~{i]:::~~:~;j~'(~J,;;lB~T~~,:;::~$l!:
    • •• . ..... ..... ,. ' , ... -. -~· - - ··-.~··.-..~ . •.. •: ; -~:;.~~#{·~· . . ..... ......·1 -J.li.O::.u . - .. . --.·...:.; .,, .... ~·.;t~.~- t• :_~:]~·~:~· . . ~~~~ .. I!:~!TIT!!::S ~~ _, -. ~~ I A ·-~~:;~r;:: .. ·..:.... dollars :~~ ~- -:! ·-f . .I ., • ·:· . !'.. ... _ .. ·.· . --:-.·: -.:.•r . :. . • ·.. ! •' - .- !JiGtribution: . . ·' 3 - Cbiof, SAS ·.·. .. ····· • ··. .. . .· 0 :' ~~ ~~~· ~ -~ .. .... .. . .. . : · •• 1 :.: ·. .. ....... ,;-~ ... . ,. . ~ ~~~~::/.: : :.~ . ·~ .(,:J. ; ·.• .. ~ .~-~~~!~~-- :~. ·. :~~~~~;.. =· :.{;f,ii.: .·. .. ;·:~ · .. ... ~ .• .·.- .~_.~: ... .. .··:·.. ... .·. ......... -:: :,,:·.., . ·.. .. , ::: · · ·~ .. ·' . ,. •!. . ·· •: ,, .. ··: ' .· , ! .. _ . . • •.
    • ... - THE BAYO~PAWLEY AFFAIR A PIDI To Destroy JFK And Invade Cuba Copyrig ht by SOLDIER O F FORTUNE Mogo>inc 1975 By Miguel Acoca and Robert K. Brown Five months before he was shot to death in Dallas, a group of conspirators attempted to destroy John F. Kennedy, This story Is an excerpt from the unpublished manuscript, Ripped Cloak, Rusty by political means. The group, which Dagger. JFK, LBJ and tho CIA's Secret War included officials Qf, T jm & J.m;., former Against Castro cretary of ultra-conservativef ssistant'fe" State and Assistant Secretary of Defense, ;:::==============::::; .Willi~ D. P jl ley sgruntled CIA w J agentSand anh::CaStTO Cubans, proposed Miguel A coca was a staff writer for Lifo to · uss1an colone maxazine for uine years, operating out of 'Gu~~~~;;;:!!!::~~~~~~~~~~·r;:x Miami office. Since the demise of l.ife, be bas hee n. employed by the :~~g!~~~~~~~~ Washinxton Post and Newsweek in Paris, M adrid and Lisbon. Rohert Brown, a lonK -time, ft'ee -lance, "~~~:....!!.~~~f!.£....1:!!!.!m.IL!JLJii.l....U-Iti-J pboto·jott malist, ba.r bee1t a close observor of tbe Cuha n scene si11ce his fi rst visit to Cuba in 1958. He was one of the urf!tlllize n· of an anti-Batista movement at the University of Colorado i11 195R; jo umeyed to Cuba in '59, and '60. In April, 1960, after baving determined the Castro regim e was going comm rmist, he /Jeg1111 supporting and wo rkh1g with antiCastro ex ile organizatio1u. Brown fi rst becam e aware of the BayoPawleJ' aff ir in the summe r of 196 7 while a 1·esenrcbing a yet uncompleted m01zuscript, Ripped Cloak , Rusty Dagger: J FK LBJ & the CIA's Sec ret War A gainst Castro. ltl early April 1964, Brown flew to Madrid to co -rmtbnf the book witb A.coca. Work on the mauuscript was term i11ated wbe12 Acoca was ordered t o Lisbon to cover the coup. Suh.reque12t resesarcb clarified 1~q~~t11J.5~~~:Jj~~~irirt-aspects ofthe story while raising even some more questions tbat. are yet tmanswered. A 1rwjm· coup was scored wben Terrance Spencer, tbe Life photographer who acco mpanied the Bayo -Pawley operation , t/ltlS located and SOF obtained the piJotOgrap hs he took on said operation. 12 SOlDIER OF FORTUNE Kennedy was assassinated a few months after the Cubans disappeared over the side of Pawley's yacht, the Flying Tiger II, as it lay off the southeast coast of Cuba in June 1963. The two events may not have been entirely unrelzted. In today's context_, Operation .§_ed Cross, seems, at best, biZarre; to unders n the actions and motivations of the parties involved, it's necessary to recall the national atmosphere and the mood of the restive Cuban exile community in Miami, in the spring of 1963. It was almost eight months after the missile crisis. The assassination of John F. Kennedy was five months away. While the rest of the country thought that the missile crisis ended in victory, to those closest to the situation - the Cubans in Miami and the CIA contingent there the Bay of Pigs remained unavenged, a defeat which had been raised to the degree of moral sin, and the sinner, to an armed band of Americans and Cubans , was President John F. Kennedy. These angry men - including CIA guerrilla warriors acting as advisers, controllers and directors of secret operations against Fidel Castro's Cuba had been gleeful the previous year when intelligence reports said that the Soviet Union was arming Castro with missiles. The Soviet move had seemed a perfect provocation for moving against Castro, and wiping out the " Communist beachhead 90 miles from the U.S.". But Kenndy was marching to a different drum. He not only refused to confirm the present of missiles in Cuba, he acted as if the shipments of missiles were the chimera of madmen. Angered by Kennedy's silence, they began to leak hard intelligence reports to favored newsmen. One of these, Hal Hendrix, began to report the build-up in the Miami
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ADDRESS •.. , ,,, .. ,,, . ,, ,,, , , .. , '(.OUR SIGNATURE... I .................... .. .... .. ............. .......... . .... . PLEASE SEND NEW FREE CO LOR CATALOG OF OVER SOO lEM S. ----------------------------- _ SOLDIER OF FORTUN E ..__ ·, !_ "'"' I I I ... 11
    • News long before President Kermedy's dramatic confirmation on October 22, 1962, that Cuba was indeed bristling with deadly Soviet missiles. Castro himself, in a stirring speech, five weeks earlier, on September 11, had, in effect, confirmed that he had weapons which could wreak havoc on American cities, a nd warned he would use them if the U.S. tried to invade Cuba. Castro did not use the word "missile," but his meaning was crystal clear, and Castrologists the world over did not miss the meaning. Yet his warning was largely ignored in the U.S. The Kennedy administration minimized the speech. Only Hendrix, who won a Pulitzer prize, and Senator Kenneth Keating, the New York Republican later defeated by Robert Kennedy, kept whipping up public opinion against Kennedy for covering up the presence of missiles in Cuba in the weeks prior to the October crises. There is no doubt that Hendrix was fed his material by a CIA source in Homestead Airforce Base, just south of Miami. There is no doubt, either, that Keating was receiving CIA intelligence material. Most Americans perceive of the Cuban missile crisis as ending in a clear American win - an exoiation of the humiliation suffered at the Bay of Pigs and a demonstration that American was the foremost nuclear power. Among the huge Cuban exile commtmity in Miami, however, the perception was far dif- Above : One of the many planning sessions held in Bayo's house. J ohn M artino, M afia figu re , (in fo reg ro und) points to Lui s Cantin over map of Cuba. Bayo , th ird fr om the left , sparked · 'O peration Red C ross," w it h letter that alleged Russian missilt! per sonnel wished to defect. Left : Financier W illiam D . Pawley p oses before his yacht , Plying Tiger JJ, w ith m ode l of P-40 . Pawley was instrumen tal in organizing the Flying T igers of pre-WW II fa m e. Why Did LIFE MAGAZINE Invest $15,000? ferent. To them, the only proper response would have been an American invaswn of Cuba and the liquidation of the Castro regime, by military means. The Cubans interpreted the missile crisis as a failure of American nerve. The subsequent Kermedy-Khrushchev deal fell like a bomb among the Americans opposed to Castro , the CIA warriors, and the Cuban exiles. It was another sell-out a thumping defeat. Rich Cuban exiles who had bought Cuban bonds and had seen them rise in price on the New York stock exchange, suddenly began to unload. Plans to return home after Castro's defeat, which somehow was expected to be immediate - were dropped. Once again Kennedy had failed to pass the test of strength. What's more, he trusted Khrushchev, a Communist, to withdraw all the missiles from Cuba. This they did not believe. Neither Khrushchev nor Castro, they were convinced, would ever live up to the agreem ent. In their view, the President It was a plot to destroy President Kennedy politically, and the CIA played a major role. Without the CIA, in fact, the was not only a coward, but a fool to boot. weird adventure could not have taken Khrushchev, they firmly believed, hid a place. Without its agents, planes, ships clutch of missiles in Cuba, and they set and communications, "Operation Red out to prove this was a fact. Cross' , the code name dreamed up by What follows is the story of how the llfe, which was anxious to publish the thought of hidden missiles became the pictures and tell where the missiles were father of a mission to Cuba which in- hidden in the words of Soviet defectors, volved the CIA, its secret network of could never have sailed toward Cuba. ships and planes, a nd such people as Without CIA cooperation, this nonformer U. S. ambassador W ~'iam event which cost Cuban lives would have qEa:Iev a conservatiye RetJ@{L~n, ren:ained th~ dream of the ~gpin of the JW" 1!.~m 1 ' p llCtiOn a flesty Cuban exile named Internal SecUfity Cernmjtke a J.iie- Eduardo Perez. His war name was Magazine reg10nal editor llf~ ~i'oe: : "Bayo." He is probably dead now. editor GeofF A1mf R !Jfi{ ~flUke all citie• by the ""'· Miami give• PMCOgt ap er Terry Spencer, n a strong odor of corruption which rti · fia f ure w o mingles with the heat of the sun, is e a roulette. w · · wafted and perfumed by the prevailing Havana Jalle y Castro, and three northwesterly winds, and then dispersed. ff.S. rnlb ry officers in the service of the Miami is a womb of obsessions - with noms y ~ex, gambling, a nd real estate claimed from the water. But its major •' '* se::s g ;;a SOLDIER OF FORTUNE 13
    • .. Above : " Operation Red Cross " strike team on atoll off sou theast coast of Cuba. Standing, from left to righ t - Tomas Vaquero, Luis Jimenez, D enys Regal, Rolando Martinez and Ren e Lomolru . Kneeling, from left to right - "Francisco'' , Luis Cantin , Eddie Bayo, Alfredo Mir and Duenas, first nam e uHknow n . r· .i .., · ·h . '• , · - ~ I • ',· -~ ~ -' · :, -· 'h d rl... ""J~~ ~ obsession is Cuba. Miamians feel, or at least felt, that Cuba - the Cuba which had everything Miami has and then some - was an extension of Miami's soul, and that Miami was both the sovereign and mecca of Cuba and Cubans. It's a myth which has nothing to do with reality. But once Fidel Castro came to power, a portion of 14 SOLDIER OF FORTUNE Miami became in fact a Cuban city - the haven of thousands who had fled Castro, and the seat of the secret war against Castro. The fact that Castro had gone over to the Communist side, that he had defeated the Bay of Pigs invasion, that he had been on the verge of using the island as a continued on page 17 Far left : Bayo, foreg round , and Denys Regal , on bo ard the Flying Tiger II, examine WWII Finnish-made 20mm Lahti anti-tank gun. Capable of penetrating 2 1 .12 inches of armor at 500 meters with a 2130 grain projectile that zipped along at 2690 fps, the Lah ti was favored by Cuban exile groups as it would play havoc with Castro patrol boats. To left of flag , note 22 -foot launch being towed. Center left : In editing Life photog raphy Terry Spencer 's negativ es, CIA fa il ed to recognize Flying T iger II name plate attached co deck. Blow up of n egative clearly shows name plate which is indistinguishable in photo to t he left.
    • Beltw: ' ' Francisco,'' standing, examin es a Automatic Browning Rifle , while Bayo, lowe r right, ad justs web gear. Strike tea m was well· armed and equ ipped for t he missio n . ··'~ Left : CIA PBY -6 A , operating under cover of Aircraft Ferr y Co ., lnc . , 28() S. W . 34 th St., Ft. Lauderdale , Florida , fl ys over ato ll , to ins ure all s trike personn el arc safe. .. Below : Bayo, left , examines a U .S . .45 cal. M -3 submachine gun inside cabin of Fly ing Tiger II. prio r to em barking for the Cuban coas t. __ n Right : Blowup of 35 mm • negative revea ls person nel · who m ay be C IA agen ts , ; that accompanied Bayo and · team . • Above: Tom as V aquaro, rig h t, helps u nk nown strike team m ember adjust lo ad bearin g straps for P RC -10 radio, a st andar d issue item o f t he U .S. mi litary dur ing th e ' ()O 's. Below : Former Life photograp her Terra nce Spencer o n boa rd CI A P BY -6A that carried strike team to rendezvous with r ,.,,,, , , ~ * -.-~_~ _ ---...=••r.-•..._-·-=>,~ ---- ~ ~·' ., ~ _., ~~#' ',.,__""' . ~·"' . ,, A bove: On e o f last pho tos , ta ken with infrared film , of str ike ream as t hey load on 22it. lau.nc.h and prepa re to lea ve ()n m1 on o f doo m . SS1 Ldc Boyo " ' " , ;m wi<h Belg ian assault ri fle on Flying "l'iJ.•cr II. Note attack laun ch in _ . .. k d , . '," bac g rou n . ' ·'i n,, h••••.
    • • Left : John M artino, M afia figure, served as the gobetween fo r Bayo and Pawley. H e died recently. Right : Eddie Bayo, aka Per ez., was hard-bitten , fearless. He claimed to have a g uerrilla unit operating in Cuba. Below left: M embers of strike team in CI A PBY -6A en ro ute to rendezvou with Flyiux :tiger II. • Left : Blowup o f PBY iden tification numbers . Below: St rike team per sonn el bein g towed to atoll fro m PBY . ;.... I I ~ Below: Martino and B ayo with ·supplies and weapons em atol l. Den y Regals, l·en ter , hokls Belgian F.N. assault rifle. In foreg round, note M 2 carbine with paratrooper stock. Fat e of st rike tea m is still a m vsrerv. Above: Luis Cantin , A lfredo Mir an d Bayo disembark PBY into rubber raft. Note PBY iden tification n umbers on fu selage which are difficult to identify fro m negative or contact proof. Below: T his barren , u nn am ed atoll ser ved as tra nsfer po in t for personnel. Flyhtg Tiger II. with CIA agents, Paw ley, life personnel , and Martino returned to th is atoll awaiting word from Bayo. N one ca me. • 16 SOLDIER OF FO RTUNE
    • ' "Did the Kennedys know about 'Operation Red Cross?' " launching platform for Soviet missiles Cuba to exfiltrate, to use secret war aimed at U.S. cities, turned Miami into a terminology, .the two assets and bring hive of conspiracy where plots were them to the U.S. Then, according to hatched in bars, swimming pools, Bayo's scenario, the two colonels would boatyards, and hotel rooms. The climate expose the President of the United States of tension, fear and distrust of Pr~sident as a fool, at best, and a liar at worst. Like so many Americans and Cubans Kennedy was such, that even the most outl~ndish plot co~d be sold to backers participating in the secret Caribbean who wanted to embarrass - if not war, Bayo was frustrated and had destroy - the President who had failed developed an intense hatred of Kennedy them. and his policies. He also mistrusted the In the spring of 1963, Eduardo Perez, CIA and the haughty professional U.S. known as Bayo to Cuban exiles, Mafia military officers assigned to train and figures, FBI and CIA agents, began to control Cuban raiders. show a letter he claimed he had received By early 1963, Bayo was bitter. His from a guerrilla unit operating in Cuba. plans to mount an operation designed to The smuggled letter said the guerrillas topple Haiti's President F rancois were holding two Soviet army missile Duvalier, the hated "Papa Doc," was colonels who had defeated and wanted getting nowhere. like many exiles, CIA asylum in t strategists, and President Kennedy s ted in no uncertain terms self, Bayo thought that Haiti was the knew where Nikita Khrushchev, with i al base for attacks against Cuba, and Fidel Castro's connivance, had hidden ' apa Doc" an easy target. missiles in violation of the agreement In those early weeks of 1963, Bayo, told friends he had to go back to Cuba, with Pr · e had because " My people are waiting for me." fought alo~e...JHO:O.'.dA.eM-:~ ,e~e~.,.st,...1y.,...,_::.-+ntKvtf+:l;•,;:.--1P>ayl:!l"o's friends included a group of ... ... . • ~eonre rtlnnmtrry a.t:re Americans who were serving as selfAfter turning against Castro, Bayo, who appointed advisors to any Cuban or was the only living holder of the rebel n·~~·;i ~:~~~~~it deMred~eir t~ents. army's highest military award, the Joseph C. ?.!rma~,;. .:!LJ.all, lanky Frank Pais Medal, equivalent to the " ' , h came to Miami imCongressional Medal of Honor, went to mediately after the ill-fated Bay of. Pigs work for the CIA. He reputedly engaged invasion to "join up" , and stayed on to in anti-Castro operations out of Guan- become a free-lance military advisor to tanamo Navy Base · in Cuba, and later, various exile groups, related that, " Bayo when the CIA organized its massive had separated from the original 'ComMiami network, he became part of the mando L', one of the most daring and hand-picked team of the Tejana lll, the effective non-CIA Cuban exile groups and legendary gunrunning converted U.S. now had a'Small group of his own . He Navy sub-chaser, which was used to wanted to go to Cuba and ma ke some hits supplytheCubanillldergroundbeforethe and we wanted to go with him. Lynn Bay of Pigs. Bayo fought World War II in Clark, a West Coast freelance the U.S. Army, and was a naturalized photographer, was selling him on taking U.S. citizen. He was hard-bitten and often us along, not only because we knew :what bullied men working with him, but he had we were doing, but also so we could get an air of self-possession and intense photogr aphs of the action, which would determination. raise more money.:· ., An Amerjcan soldier-<>f-fortune pilot, "Later", Garman continued, "Bayo award Davis, who had been aCtiVe over told us that two Russian officers had e ng an an aitian defected in Cuba. They wanted political exile groups, a o had asylum. If they could be gotten out, it the nd operate ou ould result in a lot of publicity and _.e,1 ant;mamo Naval Base. ayo. didn't money to get more guns and make bigger limit himsefi CO flgllCing castro's Com- hits. We finally drifted away from him milllism in Cuba and the surrounding because he was always stalling - al~ays waters. In Februa 1 Ba supposed to leave and never did. We got another s'oldJer-<>fe set off -our weapons back that we had stored e on door of the .Miami r95idence - with him and that was it." '151' a suspected castro G-2 ent which Anothel[~ · ~ii sa~.dit::afo e ouse away. fortune, ·~ A lrst e letter from the un erground, was, met Bayo in e . ail avis to put it simply, explosive; and Bayo introduced Bayo to "'a'llirrd Amertcah tossed it out as bait to hook right-wing adven _ _ r d for the political enemies of John Kennedy in the until the latter's violent Florida conservative establishment. But, o n w o had lost his he told Cuban exile friends who had tried lucr ati JO upon Trujillo's death, was to mount anti-Castro raids with him plot · g with a group of Haitian exiles, to before and after the Bay of Pigs, " I want pu together one of their periodic atno part of the CIA." t pts to overthrow the atavistic dieWhat he had in mind was to find t tor of Haiti, Francois Duvalier. somebody rich enough to pa y for elizing t hat the Haitians involved were weapons, equipment and a boat to go to horton military training, not to mention e bt combat experience, "John" was looking for some type of corrunando group to bolster the eager but amateur Haitians. " Bayo met with 'John' several times and 'John' was impressed," Herruning relates. "In fact, the two of them signed a formal agreement in 'John's' living room which stated that in return for helping overthrow Duvalier, the new Haitian regime would grant the Cubans bases from which they could operate against Castro." ~e HaiJ.i~s were supporting Bayo all the way," Jerry continued. "They were paymg for the fiberglassing of his boat, provided money for weapons- the whole bit. 'John' admitted to me that he was impressed with Bayo. He had a hell of a strike force and a hell of a record." While the Haitian plot sputtered along, a new factor crept into the picture. In the winter of 1963 two Miami-based soldiers of fortune who had seen Bayo's letter journeyed to New York to meet with a wealthy New York CPA and financier, Theodore Racoosin who allegedly had high contacts in the Kennedy administration. One was Howa rd Davis, a pilot who had flown for the anti-Batista rebels and later aided anti-Castro elements and a Swede whose-~'""'~-!!."'"' close to the New York CPA. e purpose of the m eeting was to interest Racoosin in supporting and perhaps funding Bayo's projected operation or finding someone who would. r,I>¥...1L..IIIDavis' recollection of Racoosin 's subsequent involvement is worth quoting at length: " We discr tssed Bayo 's plan with Racoosin and be came do w1 to M iami in a z week. Wbw be arrived, he said be had a high official in the KennedJ' admi v irt m tia.tl_. 'interested in ettin the Russia n missile texlmicians ont of C u ba. He ""ou not identify wbo it was. He met with Bayo and "' that time was satisfied that there were ituleed such tec/micians tbat had defected. Racoosin retfl.med to New Yo rk and we didn't bear from bim for a week. Then he called and told me that they (his contacts in tbe admitzistratirfm ) were t ryitt!! to chec k out Bayo 's story; that tzo intelligence reports were available that would support tbe story. Bayo bad claimed that he bad men in the mozmtains, a grottp, a co/umrz in Orien te proviTzce; that somehow, tbese Russian missile teclmicians bad defected and were in tbe mormtains with his men. All Bayo was waiting for was t ransportation and wdaprms to go in and brinK them out. No w comes the sticky part. Bayo said the Russians didtz 't trust tbe CIA. He insisted ott bein~: give1z a boat, weapons and support, so that he could go itz and con· vince tb e defectors to m eet with American intelligence agents. Racoosin suggested that art intelligence rzgerzt accompany lla.Yo to Cuba, to m eet with the RrtSsians . lJa.yo refused, restating tbat tbe Russians did not trust the Americans. He insisted he .rbould l{o almze. SOLDIER OF FO RTUNE 17
    • "What role did the Mafia play in the plot?" ~:~~i~:~~eg:V~~~~~t1:~ ~n~~;; As I recall, Racoosin 's co ntacts in the adm inistratio rl were wary of Bayo and his story, thinking it co uld have been so m e .rcbeme to sucker in a U.S. itltelligence a~:en t, so be could be ,·aptured ant.l the event pt~blicized. Tbey also fe lt that he m ay batH lm! rl makinK the .rtory up, to simply ! oiJtain arms. Racoositl said his contacts just tllt!ren 't corwinced I also received a caJI t o /?O to Palm Beach tmd m eet with a man very close to Ken· 111!t~y. I don 't remember bis name. He was interested in Bayo 's story and was en tbusiastic about !{etting the l?ussiam out. He also checked with Washitzgton an I second thoughts. M eanwbile, Ra,·oositl called me mzd .raid br badhee n contacted by someone in the W!Jite H ouse, wbo bad autborized him to orf{a1zize meetinJ!S of Cubmz exile leaders in order to obtaht information 0 11 the CIA '.r Cuba operations; that K em1edy -was tlistmstful of the CIA because be felt he //'liS recei vinK bad itlfomzation. ' ' Davis stated that Racoosin was personal friend of the head of Radio Free E~ who was working with him on the 1ra'Yol>roject. . Subsequently, Davis contacted several Cuban exile leaders and other interested parties who met with Racoosin in the conference room adjoining the office of Miami New~ editor Bill Baggs. " The meeting was attended by myself, history of involvement with Cuban exile Bill Baggs, and Racoosin," Jeg.c, activities from the time that he joined Hemming recalls, " as well as hl1 ~ Castro in the mountains in 1958, Jerry acfion people- Tony Questa, Mario Buchannan was a local newspaper Fontela; ~rn: LaBord,e. Ramon~t,reporter, and Mrs. Perry owned several Eddie Bayo, and ibe boys from the : ne~swiJllla.Jl·ube...SO.Lill:l...__ _ _ _ _~ They were giving the scoop on all the " The meeting was primarily conscrew ups." Questa and Font were erned with how anti-Castro guerrillas leaders of the independent Cuban exile ad been sold out before the Bay of group, "Commando L." Mario Fontela ·gs," Hemming recollected. was the head of the FORDC, an exile onna aspec o t e meeting anti-Castro labor movement; Larry was concluded, the group broke up into LaBorde, an American, was the captain small conversational groups. One of the of the Tejana m, the DRE was the anti- most interesting topics of conversation Castro student organization. Ironically, was Bayo's letter from the Russian both the FORDC and the DRE were being defectors. ded by the CIA, although both ~~-'II!Jle~IQ.&CUI~-eEI~W ·ganizations resented the CIA's ~!.!WiJ;;J;.IW..I.l.ll.l:...;;uJ:Ww;..~LWlLW r trictions on their operational ac- ~:::.:::.....,.;:~~l:-~~~~~~~...,. ti ities. Als o~;;~~~e e t~~ wa~ ~o~hn ~ m~Ti ingh'll1m s~J ~;..:=~Fs~~!irciffi~r,nrnirei~~ shadowy m 1a been re eas ng with the Ba of Pi the Fort Lauderdale News, Hemming ~ to reckon with continued. "This meeting-was-tlttended . He_ organized and became President of by Gore, C~sinan Kramer, Joh;--emllpania Nacional Cubana de Aviacon Martino, Frauk F jpr jp j k srs 8aeliffi!An, ~rtiss, Havana, Cuba, in 1928, which he ..Mrs. John Perry, Howard Davis then sold to Pan American in 1932. •Racoosin, myself and the CU6ans.11 Between 1934 and 1938, he built three Fr~ Ejopnj DQW lrnpwn as Fraw..,....aitcraft factories for the Chinese government and in 1940, organized the legendary Flying Tigers. He later became President of the Hindustan Aircraft Manufacturing Company in Bangalore, India and built India's first ammosulfate plant in Travancore. He was appointed American Ambassador to Peru in 1945, and Brazil in 1946. Subsequently, he served as Special Assistant to the Secretary of State in 1951, Sepcial Assistant to Secretary of Defense, 1951-52, and Special Assistant, Department of State, in 1954. In 1954, he was involved in the FOREIGN OR DOMESTIC We Sell the Finest WEAPONS MP-5 (Heckler & Koch) Win. 1897 Police Trench Gun American 180 - .22 Machine gun & Laser-Lac-Sight Leatherwood ART Sniper Scopes • H& KWeapons KTW Metal Piercing Ammo • Scotos Night Vision Scopes Military Armament Corp. Weapons System & Silencers Bullet-proof Clothing • Police & Military Catalog Avail. For Further Information on Col lectible Machine Guns , Rifles , Pistols and Shotguns, WRITE: FORD FIREARMS COMPANY 325 1 E. Speedway, Tucson, AZ 85716 (602) 793-7363 18 SOLDIER OF FORTUNE a delegate to the InterAmerican Conference for the Maintenance of Continental Peace and Security in Petropolis, Brazil, and to the Ninth International Conference of American States in Bogota, Colombia. He holds the U.S. Medal for Merit, the Air Medal of Peru, the Grand Cross of the Cruzerio do Sul of Brazil, the Orden Del Merito de Duarte, Sanchez Y Mella and Gran Cruz of the Dominican Republic, the Grand Cross of Carlos Manuel de Cespedes of Cuba, and the Order of the Brilliant Star with Special Grand Cordon, from the Republic of China. In pre-Castro Cuba, Pawley owned the Havana bus system, as well as sugar mills. He also, at one time, owned the bus lines in the metropolitan area of Miami. On December 9, 1958, Pawley went to Cuba as a secret emissary from Washington, in an unsuccessful attempt to persuade Batista to establish a junta,
    • relinquish his power and leave Cuba altogether. The powers-that-were in Washington hoped this would force Castro into the political arena, as a candidate for election. Subsequently, Pawley became an wtofficial spokesman for the old-line Cuban conservatives. He had several conferences with President Eisenhower, and finally, Eisenhower was convinced that the exiled Cubans should be armed and assisted in overthrowing Castro. wle then collaborated with the CIA n 1- astro _.~ealsatiS !iOn tko P8htf!:ees arriving in Miami. A year after the Bay of Pigs disaster, Pawley learned that two of his close Cuban friends were starving to death in a Castro prison. He knew that Castro desperately needed money and initiated efforts to purchase their release. Working through his friend, Livingston Merchant, U.S. Ambassador to Canada, Pawley negotiated the freedom of three prisoners, putting up $25,000 of his own money to secure the release of Nester Williams, a Cuban black. After their release, in July 1962, Pawley remained involved in negotiating for release of 1,113 remaining prisoners, until they were exchanged for $50 million-worth of medical supplies. " I was always ashamed that we had to bargain for those men," Pawley told the press, "rather than go there and secure their release by force, as we easily could have done." Though obviously interested in events in Cuba and staunchly opposing the Red regime in Cuba, to the best of our knowledge, it appears that " Operation Red Cross" was the only activist Cuban exile effort that he directly participated in. Subsequently, Life Managing Editor George P. Hunt, authorized the Life Regional Editor, to give Bayo $15,000 for the purchase of the necessary equipment, weapons and supplies. Concurrently, the CIA, at least at the lower levels, was brought into the plot. A deal was made between Life and the CIA, that for providing the operational funds , Life would receive an exclusive if the operation were successful. It it were not, Life agreed not to publish anything concerning the operation. Precisely why it was necessary for Life to ante up the $15,000, when the CIA, with its unlimited, unvouchered fwtds, ships, planes and agents, was involved, is unclear. Perhaps the Agency wanted to use Life Magazine as a cutout, in case the reaction to the Russian defectors' revelations wasn't quite what was suspected, e.g., they turned out to be selfseekers who defected with no more than a cock and bull story, or to disassociate the Agency from revelations that would be highly embarrassing to JFK, and with which it would not want to be directly connected. The PSE-101 PSYCHO LOGICAL STRESS EVALUATOR-from DE KTOR -the modern, accepted interrogation tool. PROVEN by over 1200 examiners, in thou sands of field tests, PSE-1 01 has firmly established its pre-eminence in the Detection of Truth and Deception. The stress-related FM in the voice is charted in hard copy fo r permanent record. Subject is free of the body sensors and attachments which create artificial, misleading stress levelsand human dignity is preserved. Courts have accepted stipulated cases and acted on the find ings. Write for furthe r details on how this unique device wi ll extend your investigative capability, reduce backlogs and shorten your case reso lution time DEKTOR COUNTER INTELLIGENCE AND SECURITY, INC. SALES & SERVICE-5508 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, Va. 22151 703/569-2900 v SOLDIER OF FORTUNE 19
    • in the backgrorn1d, and once again, playing king-maker? Or king-destroyer? At this point, it is appropriate to con- ELECTRONIC SECURITY ~[K{J[OJ !~:f ~~ed P~~~bil~:~a~:Onto R~~o ~~es~ ©@ruJ[R{]urnOOIT:illrn~@QJJOOrn~ de~e~~ne:e~; ~:;~:war~ o~ th~ pending operatwn and was momtormg 1t; 12fo!QJJOiolGVJll2fJl~ ~~ l.JlAJU~~ U The MARK II o perates d irectly from a micro phone or f rom any tape recorder providing an instantaneous d igital di splay of stress reactions of the speaker. Ten years of i ntensive research & development has resulted i n a revo lutio nary new electronic digi tal device pro vid ing an instant aneous numeric value of stress in speech. Applications include pre-e mploy ment screening . po lice and security investigations. Insurance adjustment. In ternal loss prevention. L.E.A specializes 1 developi ng high n quality .electroni c aids for special ized appllcat1ons. Our scientific investigatory and countermeasure equipment are currently being used thro ughout the world by large and small c ompanies and pollee departments who require guaranteed performance. · AD D ITIONAL PRO D U C TS DI ST R I B UTED : ~~:;~"~r~;;~~:.R•! cmctt·• • El o[lv 'T !';HlSilllliC• LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSOCIATES, INC. 88 Holmes St. Belleville, N.J .. U.S .A. 07109 (201) 751 ·0001 Cable: LEA Pt, ·.l:>r' , •.,1 tr fo1 <111f f OIIIJII!-·rc t.lt,lft~</ [IIC"IO:i~' SJ.OO Even more intriguing is the ultimate goal of the Life hierarchy. Certainly, the Life editors must have been aware of the impact that such revelations would have had on the Kennedy administration. And Life, itself, had expressed concern over the continuing reports of missiles remaining in Cuba. For instance, in the February 22, 1963 issue of Life, an editorial entitled "The Most Critical Area in the World," noted that, " ... the hardening Soviet military establishment in Cuba is a backyard menace to the U.S., and will remain so until Kennedy finds a way to dismantle it." "The reason for the undiminished uneasiness about Cuba is two-fold. First, the facts disclosed by McNamara 's aerial photography and CIA intelligence are impressive, but by nature, no con- 20 SOLDI ER OF FO RTUNE : ~i'.'1:~~~·i;.~:!~t~r$r!~:~: : ~d~':,•::~~~:,tt;~:~~~~u:~~~:,~r~ t ~ 1 1 1 1 111 : ~~.c~';t~~i~~~~:~;!;lOf • r.urt~bullc M ICtrJP h OIIL.' Bayo to the Haitians. He was as diSgUSted and fed Up with their dallying and indecision, as Joe Graman. and the American soldiers...af-fori une were with ~:.~~~;~~:!,~ R+'WI(lt~l·~ him. : ~:~.~:~~~,;~~~~~;:~:s Initially, Bayo insisted that be be : U.S.• S5.00o••W:S:L',I~ fur posr.·ryt.•. fk h11ut.;blt.o f i rs t oniL'r. elusive. Caves cannot be seen into, nor ships' holds ... 'Absolute assurance on these matters,' as CIA chief John McCone said himself, 'could only come from continuing, penetrating on-site inspection' (which Castro forbids). Facts found by other means are inevitably subject to a wide margin of interpretative error. Thence, the second ground for uneasiness: that the top interpreters may be over-<:ommitted to the view that Khrushchev would not try to fool us again about what he's got in Cuba ... The Soviets' 'defensive' weapons are offensive against the Cuban people's hope of liberty, and therefore, against the political security of the whole hemisphere.'' Did the knowledge and support of this plot stop with Life Managing Editor George P. Hunt? Or was Hepcy B 1 use pz 2. Kennedy, aware of the plot through the efforts of Racoosin, decided to hold off on pursuing the plot, and was l unaware that low-leve CIA agents, Pawley, Bayo and crew were pushing ahead with the operation; 3 _ Important figures in the Kennedy administration were monitoring and or supporting the Bayo-Pawley operation, unbeknown to Kennedy; 4. "Operation Red Cross" was organized and laW1Ched by relatively low-level CIA echelons, who could allocate the necessary agents, planes and hi · s. ps, due t0 thetr operat•tona] fl exl l y, . "b"lit Without the knowledge of etther the Kennedys or CIA headquarters in Langley; 5. An amusing possibility is that Kennedy was aware of the plot; that he knew Bayo's Jetter was phoney; that he allowed "Operation Red Cross" to proceed as he knew that Bayo was going to "sting" Luce and Life for $15,000, while he laughed up his sleeve. Bayo, meanwhile, was hedging his bet, by continuing to work with the Haitians. He was in Jersey City purchasing weapons for the proposed Haitian invasion, when Martino called and told him to 1 ·eturn to Miami immediately - that his ticket was already at the airport. assistance of Weyl, ?rovided with a boat. When this was vetoed, Pawley volunteered his own pleasure yacht, the Flying Tiger ll, which he kept anchored behind his luxurious home in Miami. The weapons to be used on the operation consisted of U.S. M-3 submachine guns, FN F AL assault rifles, M2 carbines and Browning automatic rifles. One individual who went along on the Flying Tiger claimed that the weapons were obtained from the CIA ; another source claims that they were commercially purchased by either CIA agents or individuals who had been CIA agents, and who had also been former employees of Pawley in Cuba. In any case, the weapons were top quality and in sufficient quantity. Other equipment for the ten man team included U.S. Army PRC-10 and PRC-6 radios, which, at the time, were not available on the civilian market, an infrared beacon set, new clothing, boots, web gear and a sm all '
    • :~~yw~j~ t~~!!!elo~~~ ~!a~ !~~hb!thOr~b! ~!~ ~iS~~22!':gain Fiying Tiger to the Cuban coast. This equipment cost nearly $15,000. (Bayo purchased the weapons with the money he received from Life. ) When finalized, "Operation Red Cross" called for Pawley's Flying Tiger n, manned by Pawley, his Cuban crew and three CIA agents, with noms de guerre of "Rip," "Mike," and "Ken," to sail for a rendezvous point off the southeast coast of Cuba, a small barren atoll. A CIA PBY-6A was to carry Bayo, his team, the Life Regional Editor and Terrance Spencer, a former Spitfire pilot, tw-ned freelance photographer, and then disembark them near an atoll in rubber rafts. The aircraft would be employed to minimize the amount of time that the Cubans and Martino would have to spend on the Flying Tiger II, thus reducing the possibility of treachery. They would then link up with and transfer to, the Flying Tiger II, which in turn , would carry them to their departure point near the Cuban coast. The strike team would travel the remaining distance in a 22-foot launch that had been towed from Miami by Pawley's yacht. Bayo would locate the Russian defectors, r endezvous with the Flying Tiger II at sea, and all personnel would then return to the U.S. zed is still cloudy. We do know that had retained a Russian linguist to interrogate the defectors somewhere along the line; that, at some point the defectors were to be delivered to James Sour wine, Chief Consul to the U.S. Senate Internal Security Corrunittee, for We do not yet know how the results of the interrogation were to be used. The PBY, operated by the CIA, under cover of a legitimate aircraft ferry firm , surprisingly enough nameq Ajr~raf Ferry Company, Inc , theQloc'ated at 280 -s:w. 34th Street, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and flown by a Navy pilot, took off fr om Miami International Airport, around midnight on June 7, 1963, and some eight hours later, landed near the designated atoll. Spencer recalls that en route, all the passengers were locked in the center compartment. Upon landing, they loaded into rubber rafts and pushed off for the atoll. There are two versions of what followed. Sometime after the operation in 1963, the Life editor who accompanied the operation claimed that, as the Flying Tiger II had become lost, the CIA raider ship, Rex, was ordered to the rendezvous, to meet the two rafts. One of the Rex's 22-foot launches, normally used to carry CIA Cuban exile commando teams, agents and supplies, to and from the Rex and the Cuban coast, was lowered and met the rafts. A squall swept in, and as a storm threatened, the launch began to lose air and all personnel were transferred to the launch. Dangerously overcrowded, the launch rode out the storm and then landed the personnel on the atoll, where they waited until the Flying Tiger II arrived. Terry Spencer , however, states that the Rex was not on the scene, but that the rubber boats were towed to the atoll by the Flying Tiger II launch. Once again, we have two versions of what happened on the Flying Tiger II. The Life Regional Editor had also stated, that the three CIA agents had kept their submachine guns trained on the Cubans and Martino, the entire time that they were on the Flying Tiger II, as they did not trust them. contradicts this account, stating that " The CIA agents and the Cubans were quite friendly." The Life Editor, when recently questioned by Robert K. Brown about these inconsistencies was uncooperative, as the following conversation indicates: Brown: We are finally publishing the Bayo-Pawley story. Life Editor: The " what" story? Brown: The Bayo-Pawley story. Life Editor: Oh, Yeah? OK. Brown: I've been working with Mike on it. He requested my not using your name. I asswne you don't want me to, so I won't. 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',111 luo.:-l.. 0111l S.. t hjl."o~ ''''":''"() lmc onJI .:olll• "ltllo 111t, l lo"l,.. h• J r..,..~·mbk llllll IC~C~. l lnw hi•••'Cilb) d!tll 1o1r.. l l.•w l•+ o>pl'ub' J'ldUIII:!, llo•w hi olf1'1.' 11 It unrr,•uwmr.a;. ,. .,,.)1,, ttf t+bt:litHilt: IIIIJ'II' U" uu.; tJ.m• I" fll i..<o·· 11 lo~o.: U .'llho>ul J'l~ k•ll&•" I CIII..n"IRS llic m(o·lunmn, lluw h•nl.ll.o• '''' " uwn h~ot•l•. 103 ..... ... ........ .. .. 54.95 104 ....... .. . . . . . . . . S4.95 sF' - - o - o ; -o . --;;;;:k -;- CDe-;rZPubl ica tions ~Dept Rox 22005 1 Phoeni x, A Z 85028 S I P.O. 101 10 2 103 10 4 0 MAST ER CHARG E Send Manual s Circled 10 5 - All 5 On ly $ 24 .95 - S ave $4.80 !!! 1 TECH NI QU E OF SAFE & VAU LT MANIPU LATION t..1 1d 1JI I) ):l:ttd c.l ,.,·~~o· l o ' "'wJioa l. 1..-:r~-c . I>J.: nJn'~. UJ~ ~' ·III U. •t. t'h..u l • Ill•'.: :,',~~~/~~~~:;;~,;::::';,,t;;:l~·::u p ~ ·m ~1cp ~y SLL P !1Jit i S..'· ' ,,. ~to.:tual ~.If!.' J,._.._ '"' 105 9 95 _ ___.__ _ _.__ _·_.__ _ _ _ _ _ _ . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. s . Pos t paid In U. S. and Canada o the rs add $1.00 p er book . I Name - -- - - - - -- -- - - -- -- - - - - -- -- -- -- -- - - - I Add re ss - -- - -- - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - -- I Cit y - -- -- -- - - - - - - - S ta te - - Z IP - - - I MC Card Number ________ _ _ _ _ _ E xp. Date _ _ 1 Number Above Nam e _ _ Signed SOLDIER OF FO RTUNE 21
    • · · · · · ~'4 ' ;: . ~ ·. Above: FNLA troops m arch t o war in norther n Angola . M ost are ar.med wit h SKS carbines; th ose in lower r igh t with AK · 47's. War for meres in A n gol a wiU not be the "cake-walk :' it Right : FNLA leader Daniel Chipenda salu tes his troops north of Luan da. l n foreground is a Ch icom 12.7 -mm DshK M 38 heavy m achinegun in anti· air craft configuration . ..::-:. Left : Sa lisb ury based pilots of A ir T ra n s-Africa, Ed Davis of the U .S . and veteran o f Con go a nd Biafran air lifts (ri ght) a nd Ad rian Cha rlton o f Rh odesia !1cw refugees o ut of Nova Lisbo;t. Righ t: Portuguese Marineturned-m e rcenar y attached te the · 'CH IPE' · Squadron of FNLA in N o va Lisboa, Angola. -'
    • Meanwhile, Pawley arranged for the PBY to search for signs of Bayo's party. For several days, the PBY attempted to establish radio contact with the groupbut no luck. Nothing was ever found-no boat, no debris, no life jackets, no bodies. There are a variety of theories as to what happened to Bayo and his team. One theory is that they made it to shore and were eventually wiped out by either Castro's militia or a Russian unit. Others believe that they were let off too far from shore, that they ran into heavy seas and sank with all hands. Eddie Baez, a leader of "Commando L," the exile group that sank the Russian freighter Baku in March of 1963, believed ·the latter. He blamed the skipper of the launch, characterizing him as incompetent. Baez maintained that if Bayo and his team had been killed in a firefight, some word would have seeped out. Certainly, reports would have filtered back if any of Bayo's team had managed to exist in Cuba for any length of time. Finally, in a brief interview on October , 15th of this year, Pawley admitted to a SOF investigator that he participated in "Operation Red Cross," but was surprised to find out that we were publishing an account of the affair. He stated that, "They should get the information from me ... or they are going to have a very inaccurate book." Apparently, he was quite confident that his involvement would never reach the public eye, as he said, "I have a letter from Life magazine - they own the pictures - that no pictures would be released, and no article 1nitten without my consent! I've got that in writing! ... It's sort of a top secret deal!" When queried as to what happened to Bayo's commando team, Pawley replied, "We were never able to trace the men. I had a flying boat (the CIA PBY-QA) over the area for five days looking for them. I think they were captured, killed or their boat sank. Pawley seems to lean toward the latter theory, as he pointed out, "I put them into a smaller boat that I'd brought (Towed behind the F1ying Tiger II from Miami). The small boat had ten men in it. It shouldn't have had ten men with all the guns and arnmuuition and everything else." Asked if he really thought that Bayo could produce the two Russians, Pav.rley stated, "We thought, or frankly knew, that it was one of those one-in-a-thousand chances -that there was anything to it. For a 1vhile, I thought that these men were Castroites, trying to capture us. But we took precautions against that! They refused to take the two rubber boats that I had there, so if they had problems with their boat, they probably sank like a rock. If they got ashore, they may have been killed off by Castro's people - or they may have joined Castro's people ;ind still be down there, living happily!" If Bayo and company did indeed make it to shore, and were eith~r captured or killed, the question is, why did Fidel not publicize the event? It was his custom to conduct a TV special, and rave about American imperialism, whenever CIA agents or those he wished to portray as CIA agents, were apprehended. Perhaps, if in fact, there were Russian defectors in the mountains, Bayo's people were eliminated and the whole affair was hushed up, to eliminate any embarrassment that would have occurred from having to admit that such defectors existed. And there are many who question Bayo's true motives. Some observers believe that he may have been plotting the assassination of Castro, or that he simply created the whole defector story out of whole cloth, to obtain enough equipment and weaiXJns to return to Cuba, to conduct guerrilla operations against Castro. Many of the activist Cuban exiles, who were aware of Bayo's claims, were skeptical. "Alpha 66," another militant exile group, refused to support Bayo. Tony Questa, another leader of "Commalldo L," who is presently in a Cuban prison, considered the letter, "a farce." After a few weeks, the heirs of Bayo and his team, contacted Life, in an attempt to obtain the same benefits paid those CIA agents who were killed - a lump sum or monthly payments of $10,000. They were told lo contact the CIA, that Life would not pay them. They were not heard from again and it is tu1knovm whether they did receive any CIA death benefits, although they were certainly entitled to them. Efforts to shed additional light on "Operation Red Cross,'' by contacting the participants who returned, have been relatively unproductive. When intervieved in 1967, John Martino refused comment, as he was ". . . afraid of something." He died in August of this year. Efforts to locate the heirs or the Cubans that crewed on the Flying Tiger 11, have been fruitless. The Life Regio:Ial Editor had clammed up, as was noted earlier. Attempis to contact Pawley by phone in 1970 were unsuccessful. His secretary stated that he had no knowledge of any "Eddie Bayo" and that he refused to discuss the subject. A call to his office after his brief phone interview with the SOF investigator brought no results even though we left a message "1h his secretary that we 1vere going to publish this article and forwarded copies of Terry Spencer's photographs. "Vehavenot been able to contact either George Hunt or Racoosin to get their version of the story. As we go to press, another bizzare explanation of the fate of Bayo and his men came to light. During our efforts to identify the individuals in Spencer's photographs, we located a Cuban exile who knew Bayo's second-in-command, who had missed going on the mission due to an injury received in a tractor accident. This Cuban exile, who later married Bayo's widow, and then divorced her, told our contact that he had been told by Cubans who had crewed on the F1ying Tiger II during Operation Red Cross, that Bayo and his men had been killed when they and their launch had been hit by a round from a 57mm recoilless rifle. Our contact was unclear as to whether the recoilless rifle had been fired from Pawley's yacht or another ship - whether it was done on purpose or was a mistake. In any case, he claims that the man who fired the weapon was killed shortly after he returned to Miami - that the Flying Tiger ll's crew and Bayo's second-in-command are fearful of detailing precisely what happened. After 12 years, the - mysteries surrounding Operation Red Cross still stand. Who has the answers? Are there still missiles in Cuba? MACHINE GUNS AUTOMATIC WEAPONS & Related Para Military Ordanance Available to the 11 Professiona1 Adventurer" and other Qualified Purchasers. We have nothing but the fi.nest weapons in stock-for immediate transfer. Many Parts Available. R.J. Perry & Associates, Inc. P.O. Box 151 Park Ridge, Illinois 60068 MERCENARIES NEEDED NOW! persons with military or intelligence skills for rewarding and high paying work in overseas areas1 year iHN. Taking placement applications NOW. SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY!! Send $1.00 to cover postage and handling. For immediate reply- write to: ~amas QE nterpris e5 GEl 7th Floor El Camino Bank Bldg. 201 E. Lincoln Anaheim, Calif 92805 SOLDIER OF FORTUNE 61
    • ·continued from page 21 Brown: I obtained the pictures from Terry Spencer, which I'm using to supplement the article. I want to clarify a few points. The main one being just what part the Rex played in the operation. Life Editor : Bob, look, uh . .. if Spencer wants to break my deal, he can do it. I can't go along with this. And therefore, I don't want to sound unfriendly, but I can't cooperate with you. Brown: OK. Life Editor: I made a deal not to publish those pictures if we didn't find those guys again, and those pictures don't belong to Spencer . Therefore, he doesn't have any right to give them to you. If he gave them to you, he can get his ass burned. They belong to Time, Inc., still, and somebody may get sued, so that's all I really want to tell you about it. I think that you're making a mistake. Brown: OK. Life Editor: Sorry, Bob, I don't like to sound like that . . . you can come by Washington and talk about anything else, but that one . . . and not under those circumstances. Brown: OK. I wanted to pursue every iead and come up with as accurate a presentation as possible. Life Editor : I understand that, but to cooperate with something that I can't agree with is wrong. In any case, all personnel boarded t he Flying Tiger IT and proceeded to the Cuban coast. In the middle of the night of June 9th, several hundred meters from' the Cuban coast, Bayo and his nine men piled into a 22-foot Betram-hulled speedboat powered by two inboardoutboard engines, that had been towed behind the Flying Tiger IT from Miami. Spencer shot a full roll of infrared film as the strike team loaded their gear and made their final preparations. In a few minutes, they sped off into the gloom never to be heard from again. Spencer recalls, "Other than having to dodge a Cuban gunboat, we had no excitement. We then returned to an atoll and waited for the return of our boys. Finally, on June 12th, it was decided to r eturn to Miami without them. " The CIA PBY flew to the atoll and picked up Spencer, the Life editor, Martino and some of the CIA agents at 2 A.M. on the 13th and flew back to Miami. " When we arrived back at Miami airport," Spencer recalls, " no one checked my film bag. We checked into the Key Biscayne Hotel and sacked out. After I woke up, I called the Life editor and asked what he wanted me to do with all this film . He laughed a lit tle bit and rang up the CIA in Miami and asked them if they wanted the film. Apparently, they were a bit embarrassed and sent a car over to pick it up. I don't know what happened to it after that, until it was returned to me in England about a year later." POLITICAL VIOLENCE AND INSURGENCY Edited by Major Bard 0 'Neill, Major D.J Alberts and lieutenant Stephen J Rosetti "This is a timely and scholarly effort that seeks to illuminate generalizations about the phenomenon of insurgency . .. it contains valuable information and insights on several insurrections, particularly those in Northern Ireland, Portuguese Africa, Thailand, and Iraq. This book is recommended for those who wish to keep abreast of and understand revolutionary movements Phoenix lox 837 - Dept. S Arvada, Colo. $12 •95 80001 existing in the world today." Brigadier General John S. Pustay Acting Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence 550 pp, 5x8 U.S. Air Force hardcover VILLAGE DEFENSE Initio! SECRETS OF Special FOJces Operations lnV1e1 Nam Init ial Special Fo r ces UNDERGROUND Operati o ns in Viet Nom ORGANIZATION & By Colonel Ronald Shackleton OPERATIONS Originally published by the Special Operations Research Office, under the auspices of the U.S. Army, this com· prehensive work reveals for the first time under one cover how underground organizations are conceived, developed and organized; how they operate and con· duct missions. Hardcover only $12.95 $8.95 29 1 pp , 8xl l 60 SOLDIER OF FORTUNE VILLAGE DEFENSE Village Defense is a deceptively simple title to a most complicated campaign conducted during the formative years of Special Forces operations in Vietnam. This personal account covers the Special Forces involvement during a phase of the war that is not really widely known. Unlike most "experts'' who have gained fame for their writings on Vietnam, Shackleton learned the lessons he presents here firsthand, the hard way, by trial and error. He did it! He lived it! $12.95 175 pp , 8x ll
    • rewards are obvious. Jim Clark is one of the few men who has really gotten behind me." To promote this year's match Burgess invested three thousand dollars. He sent five thousand flyers to shooting clubs, magazines and police departments . . Burgess also wrote to specific instructors and marksman teams. " I suppose these flyers were opened and immediately recognized as a hoax. I only heard from two police departments and had no responses from the various marksman teams and instructors," Above : Seven targets have a two inch 10 Burgess said. ring and total of three inch diameter. Each The event received very little national ta rget receives two shots. Course covers attention but Burgess knows he has 216 yds. created enough excitement and gossip in the shooting world to insure his success. " I've had a lot of calls since October A SKETCH nth from people complaining they had Above: T hree targets - at 50, 56, and 60 not heard about the match but I know OF THE yds. - ha ve three inch 10 ring and to tal they did. They will be here next year." fi ve inch dia meter . Burgess personally The next match will be held in COURSE Laramie, September 4th, 1976. The top des igned ta rgets. forty shooters will be able to qualify until 216 yards .twenty-four hours before the match. One week before the match this year , only a dozen shooters had bothered to -- -~ - - J_!Y~S _ _ _ ~ / qualify. Burgess had advertised he would take the top forty. Seven of the entrants / / were from Laramie and surrounding / towns. Burgess explains, "Even the local / fellows wer e waiting for the hqt shots to ~ arrive. When they didn't, they joined in / the fun and took a shot at the money." / t<.s, Two of the local contestants were / excellent shooters and had qualified at left hand / "~, 0 the beginning of the summer. They were '-.1/. David Thompson and Don Sneddon, who ~'#of placed 3rd and 4th . left ha11d JlThe match drew a response from 15 YDS ~ nQ_:ty~ another nationally knovm shooter, Al ,---~ 5 Nichols, named by Jeff Cooper in 1974 as 10 a Senior Master of the Pistol in Cooper on Handguns, participated in the match . ... 0 Like Jim Clark he was enthusiastic but ... finished out of the money. And like Jim "' ..... Clark he -will be back next year and more 7 prepared for the NSL. I 1st ~ $5,000 - William Belt- Model14 (K38 ) {--_12.12...:JY:_!1D:l--4---7(e;lft Ihand I Smith and Wesson, six inch barrel I 2nd I $2,000 - Robert Dawson - Model 14 I I (K38) Smith and Wesson, six inch barrelI I bull barr el Bo-Mar rib I I 3rd $1,500 - David Thompson - Model 19 Smith and Wesson, six inch barrel "" "" "" .. " ,. ., "" " I 4th $1 ,000 - Don Sneddon - Model25 1955 target .45 Smith and Wesson N t ~ 10 ~ 8 IJt.:l'e tt l',uh Additional information concerning ne xt year's match maybe obtained from Robert 0 . Burgess, National Shooters League, 504 Lyons, Laramie, Wyoming 82070. ____....,______ SOLDIER O F FORTUNE 59
    • Panel Asks PaWley~s Testimony OnJFK Senate in'estlgators are preparIng to call or if necessary ·:subpena· former ambassadot William D•. Pawley, who now lives in Miami,· early next year. They believe he bas information needed for their upcoming re·· opened inquiry into President John Kennedy's assassination . Pawley has been ducking phone calls from a subcommittee of Sen. Frank Church's Intelligence Com· mittee. In one instance, when Pawley was reached, he clammed up. The subcommittee has lnfOI;matlon that Pawley master-minded a CIA project in the early 1960s involving a group of young anti-Cas- OFFBEAT WASHINGTON vera giBBer I
    • tro Cubans. One of the youths later shadOwed Lee Harvey Oswald. who offered himself as a "hired gun" to a Communist group in New Orleans. The Cuban taped Oswald's pitch. When JFK was murdered, the material was turned over to the FBI. It is believed now that the information was withheld from the Warren Commission. Two senators Richard Scbweiker (R .• Pa.) and Gary Hart (0., Colo.) head the subcommittee. They want the Cuban's name, but ' Pawley says he doesn't have it. Pawley told The Herald he'd be ~elighted to go to Washington to testify if they wanted him to, and lhat he'd spoken to Sen. Schweiker and -assurer him he had nothing to •eveal on the subJect. ~ The forthcoming probe will PXplore whether the CIA and FBI ~ered up evidence that could l!ave affected the Warren Commission's findings that oswald alone ~illed JFK. l~ ' Secret depositions are being •ken now, with public hearings peeled to open in 1976. .. Pawley 1 who served as envoy to ·reru and Brazil in tJle 1940s, is now 79 years old. He lives in affluent retirement. Clare Boothe Luce, former am· bassador to Italy, recentlY revealed that she worked with Pawley on 1he CIA Cuban proJect. At one point. she recalled, Pawley gave ber the nam" of the Cuban whose testimonv the subcommittee now serks. • But Mrs. Lu1.:e won't e to rele<tse th~ ~-~~il~~ri~ , becausj j
    • t . I."' ~f"1 "l • I Wi 1ia~n Pawley~ E~Envoy To rizil~Avia1-io~ £xrert bu~i.ncs! his Cuba. career at tne a£:e o{ 11 in rood to sailors in '1&· seli~ ~ ML.)tl BEAC'fL ta. (AP)-WUiam ,·ana )arbor. into government set''i.ce He went. DouglaS pawa·· , ;ormer U.S. dor to Braz.il and Peru and an ana· with the u.S. entrY into 'or:d war 1t. tion entre'Pr neur, i5 dead at SO. PoGen. Claire cr.ennault ir. lice 53id ne .11led bimseU on FridaY· the T igers. a volunteer raw •y, wr.o organized sc,·era grouP of American ptloH that iouzht for Gen. r...ai-she·.- before bea,·iation c .npanies and helped torm comin; part oi the -regutc.r cs.. the World sar 11 flying Tigers. sbol Another {amo15 general. Jame! DCOl· him5CH : . the chest after lea•-ing a i.ttle. once serYed as a pUot for note ask;.g forc;iveness oi hiS vnie, ambas~a· ~1r. assis•ir.~ {ormin~ flyin~ Ch.al~g ~tr. pawe'~ te~t ~rmY· Edna. 'POlice said. ~r. pawleY· v;as narr.ed i,;.S. ambas· Authorities said he -was st11 alive sador to peru in 19-1...5 and ...,·as a.-u'oa!when an ambulance reached hiS home on s unset 1s1and T,-.o jtSt oif ")ami saO.or to :Orai.U t.uring 1945.4:3. Beach. He died i:l the emer:;;encY He re-urned to Havan:l in 1949. rounded a bus com?anY. and r etu:-ned r oon' of ~t. smai uospital . Anita p awl eY, his niece and !lecre•o w asnint,ton 1n lS:'lL He sen·ed varl· t an'· said he h ad been sunerin1 trom ousY as a special to the sec· shngles. a painiUl di!ease of the retaries oi Sta~:c and Dclense. nerve endings. ior tt".ore than a year) ir. p av;eY aho i ounded the "He in considerable pain." she Transit Cort'p2nY z.nd tne : .i;ltnl said. "The pain was excruciating.'' Beach F.auwaY co.. .>Cal transcorta· Mr. PawleY was an "nation c,.:pert tion .h3t be 131.!f 10d t.O who organiz.ed the Cuban national air· line in Havana in 19'Z9. 'fhat tne later Dade c ounty. rnerged with pan .~rn -~~aS''fbe nati..-e of florence, s.C., started csi· ot asq~tant ".a~ sy~.Ctn!; ' ~Hatni ' I
    • " 'Oke.._ "t-·· 4'r ov.. DEA 1' II S r . {:.~t} J f"' ---......::..:: I' I.J D. Pawley, Oil Company Fo rvice for Eugene a brother of Edm Pawley, Will be and- Irene Pawley, were in business ay at St. Stephen's With the U.S. government furnishurch in Coconut ing food and equipment to the Navy Base at Guantanamo Bay, When he was born. ·ey, a native of Cuba, 'ay in Graham, Tex .• He was in Hong Kong at the outwas founder and presi- break of World War ll and was e Pacific Oil Co. captured by the Japanese but was Wley's parents, Edward P. repatriated. He was with his broth~ er William in the aviation business ~ - '• ;-., I ,.....,. ~-'-,'..: c.re and helped found the Flying Tigers. Whi ch operated in mainland C'hina. helped opera te the Talisman He spent the entire war as a Co. In the early 1 J970s, he mo , member of the Office of Strategit; Graham. Services as head of the China desk company. Tex., co found th p 1 in Washington, D.c Mr. Pawley had lived in Mi After the war. he joined his brothers in Havana where they in the 1920s and 1930s and con1'1·~ 1 ~ founded a PUblic transportation ered It his permanent home. He leaves his wife Bobbie El m business. He moved to Mexico in the 1950s to join in a silver mining Ellsworth Pawley; two sons, l::u. venture With other Mexican busi- gene D. Jr. and Stephen Ellsworr h Pawley; and a broth er, Edward P nessmen. ary. His brother William died in Jan uJn recont yea'S, Me. Pawley The famny '<quests memo,ial• liv<d in Belle Glade, wh.,e he to the Ame,ican Cane" SoCiety. -trude Fr'<ar. . I May~:w's Widon I
    • Thursday, January 8, 1976 t'M lfiiSASTROUS MISSIOr Miamian Pawley Tells of '63 Cuben exiles whose fate to this day is not known. Bv DON BOHNING Herald Latin America Editor In early 1963, Miamian William D. Pawley, a former U.S. ambassa- dor to Brazil and Peru and a man with influence in high places, received a telephone call from Sen. James Eastland, chairman of the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee. lt was to lead to a fascinating tale of caribbean intrigue, including: e A planned infiltration of Cuba to rescue two Soviet defectors who m~never have existed. • CIA support for the operation. • e Checkbook journalism in the for m of a $15,000 subsidy for the project from Life magazine. e The disappearance of 10 Pawley agreed to tell the story in detail Wednesday after its outlines appeared in City Magazine of San Francisco and are scheduled for publication in the next issue of Soldier of Fortune magazine. TillS IS the story, told chronologically as Pawley remembers it: Pawley, who earlier had appeared before Eastland's subcommittee, received a call from the Mississippi Democrat, who said he had just met an American released from Cuban prisons. The American, John Martino, a man with Mafia connections then unknown to Pawley, said that he knew some Cuban exiles who bad contact with an anti-Castro group in Baracoa, a coastal town at the extreme northeast tip of Cuba. The exiles reported that two Russian technicians had defected from a missile base in the area and were in the surrounding hills. The Cuban exiles wanted to bring them out. Pawley said he told Eastland that he thought the chances of success were slim but that he would be glad to see Martino (who died in Miami last year). Martino went to see Pawley, repeating the story of the two Russian defectors and saying that 10 Cuban exiles in Miami from the Baracoa area wanted to bring them out. Martino said that he I thought the exiles were "completely reliable" but that they would need substantial support if they were to carry out the mission. PAWLEY ASKED to meet the
    • ~ ------ Cuba Operation, Loss of 10 Exiles The Cuban exiles had an 18-foot Cubans. He grilled them on the details of the Baracoa area, which craft to be used as the actual infilPawley knew well, "so they tration vessel, with Pawley's Flying couldn't fool me on that score." Tiger getting no closer than 10 ':"ney convinced him they were from miles to the coast of Cuba. Baracoa. Pawley arranged to meet with the Cubans and see their boat It Pawley called Eastland back, telling him that it would be a high-risk was, says Pawley, "a piece of junk that wouldn't make it to the coast operation and that Pawley would have to discuss it with Lt. Gen. Pat with five men in it, let alone 10. Carter, then deputy director of the CIA~ to "I HAD to come home and make mei(w~~-~~~~~:·~?~-~~~¥~ for up my mind whether I wanted to me to brmg my boat ba~k mto my~~e an investment in this thing, dock at Sunset Island Without hav- ~hich would be quite substantial ing ~o go through customs or im~~i-'but one that would be of great imgration should we be successful m portance to the United States ~ out~ectors." should there be two defectors and The boat WaS.~ t the mission be successful," says Flying Tiger, named after the Fly- Pawley. ing Tigers which Pawley helped orHis decision was to go. He ganize in China with Claire Chennault. William .D. Pawley ... 'worth taking'
    • C ~GEI bought a 22-foot boat with 100 horsepower inboard and outboard motors capable of speeds up to 40 miles an hour. He also bought two 10-man rafts and then contacted the CIA for assistance "if I could get it. onsulted Carter an e told me he could not become involved, that the CIA could not do anything directly but that he would try to fulfill my request to find me three good men . . . an armaments expert, a good navigator and a good radio operator. "I had an excellent radio on board," remembers Pawley, "but I { wantea to oe fn constant touch with the CIA office in Miami o I with the Coast Guard, which cou rescue us if anything happened." • ought Paw ey, he had things organized. But, on the day before the Flying Tiger was to depart for a small island about 80 miles off the northeast coast of Cuba, Martino brought the Cubans to ee him. "T ace $15,000 from Life magazine with which they had bought the military • · needed for the ·voyage and that Life was o ·along a reporter and a photographer," Pawley recalls. "As far as I was concerned, that blew the deal. I couldn't .conceive of the U.S. government letting me go ahead under those circumstances." Life magazlne's Miami bureau appealed to Pawley to reconsider. He said no but did agree to speak with a Life executive who flew to Miami from New York. He gave Pawley a letter saying that, if Pawley permitted the Life reporter and photographer to accompany the expedition. all film taken would be .o'v.e·~'liO-...t:<:I.W.~ to the island and for the next three days took one of the exiles at a time up to the bow to teach him how to use the armaments and other equipment. At the end of three days they were in pretty good shape so I decided we would leave about 5 in the afternoon and we would get 10 miles off Baracoa by about 9 p.m. "We took off and headed ror Baracoa, hoping to (J{)d we wouldn't run into a Cuban gunboat. Fortunately, we didn't." WHEN THEY were 10 miles off Baracoa, said Pawley, "we could see the City lit up like a church. We decided to send all the boys (the exiles) into the bow while the armaments were taken out of my bedroom and loaded on the 22-footer." PaWley. safer he to1d Eddie Bayo, the leader of the exile group, that Bayo was "absolutely foolish" to try to take all 10 men in the smaller boat when three men could do it just as easily. All of the Cubans insi$J.ed.,.on going. -Pawley then said he insisted that they take at least the two 10-man rafts "because on a 10-mile-trip you don't know what you are going to encounter with a boat that heavily loaded." The Cubans refused. As he stepped into the smaller boat, Bayo a sked Pawley for his watch, saying "I'll be back with it the day after tomorrow." AS THE smaller boat headed for Baracoa in the murky darkness, the Flying Tiger turned around and headed back to the island. "We had gone about 10 minutes when 'The Tiger' was illuminated by a big floodlight. We were desperately afraid that a Castro gunboat had found us," Pawley remembers. It turned out to be a passing cruise ship. '1t was the greatest relief you could imagine." The Flying Tiger reached the is- ~n~o::st~ ory~~r~~~=~=~~ii!~.:;;;;~~~ Paw would guarantee that would be written without' his consent. Based on the letter, Pawley said, he called Eastland, who said he thought the operation could pro ceed on that basis. Not certain how trustworth Martino and the 10 Cubans were, Pawley decided to let the Flying Tiger depart for the three-day trip to the island with the three CIAprovided specialists, the two Life representatives, his own captam and his chauffeur aboard. HE THEN chartered a flying boat to take the 10 Cubans, Martino and himself to the rendezvous point. l:h~~jf £mm Mja m j .abouy a.m.. on a June marni~ iR-l-9 . . "t:::I;I'Slted every one of those . guys as they got on board," said . Pawley. "At this point, I had no as. surances of any kind of what type of men I was dealing with . . . whether they were anti-Castr ·pro-Castro." J · /fhey met at the tiny uninhabited island seven hours later than scheduled after the Flying Tiger lost its bearings in a rainstorm. That was abou~ 5 p.m., as Pawley remembers it. "We dropped anchor right close diately to hire the flying boat for another five days to "circle the area every day until those boys came out and to direct them back to the island." AT THE end of five days, when nothing had been heard, "we gave up and came back to Miami on 'The 1 ' "Althoush I tried f~several ye'"ars to hnd out what · happ~ tno ":one na.s. ever:::Jiad die sitglltestidea." Pawley sa~'eduesday. His f1rst gueS's is that they probably never made it to shore. "I really had made a tremendous plea for not more than four of them to go but to no avail. They all insisted on going in." Neither is it inconceivable, says awley, that the 10 Cubans "were 100-per cent Castroites." The 79-year-old Pawley as " reat misgivin there' act a ly believed .. ~-we were · 1f it were a 100 to 1 or , chance. the cost.o; were comparatively small and something that I could afford to do. The risk was worth taking."
    • THE MIAMI HERALD sunday, Jan.-9; 1977 DE .4 THS Ri es for William Pawley The Monday services will be folMemorial services for industrial- lowed by cremation. ist and former ambassador William Members of the Pawley family D. Pawley will be held at 4:30 p.m. suggested Saturday that. in lieu of Monday in the Miami Beach Com- flowers. contributions be made to munity Church, 1620 Drexel Ave. the Miami-Dade Community ColPawley, 80, died Friday after- lege scholarship fund. noon as ~e result of what the Pawley. once a member of the Dade CountY Medical Examiner's college's board of directors. was Office determined was "a gunshot widely known throughout the Cawound or the chest - suicide." ribbean and Latin America as an aviation pioneer. planter. builder and a sometimes "go-between" for the United States in sensitive diplomatic matters with foreign govern- ~ ments. His business interests were as widespread as his travels and covered shipping, airlines. construction, real estate, chemicals and sugar production. At one time he had consolidated four small local bus lines into the Miami Transit· Co., which he later sold to Dade County. He is sunived by his wife Edna; a son, William D. Pawley Jr.: two daughters, Annie Hahr McKay of Hartford, Conn .. and Mrs. Irene P. Baldwin of Coral Gables; two brothers, Edward Pawley of Coral Gables and Eugene Pawley of Gra- • ham. Tex.; four grandsons; and two granddaughters. Lithgow 54th Street Chapel is in charge. I