Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Engaging with the Framework
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Engaging with the Framework

246

Published on

AITSL has collaborated with education stakeholders to develop the Australian Teacher Performance and Development Framework. The Framework has been developed based on research, national mapping and …

AITSL has collaborated with education stakeholders to develop the Australian Teacher Performance and Development Framework. The Framework has been developed based on research, national mapping and analysis of existing practices, advice from national and international experts, and national consultation.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
246
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • PurposeFamiliarise the Australian education community with the Australian Teacher Performance and Development Framework Convey a consistent message to the education community Speak to the need for a shared national approach to effective teacher performance and developmentKey points to shareAITSL has collaborated with education stakeholders to develop the Australian Teacher Performance and Development Framework. The Framework has been developed based on research, national mapping and analysis of existing practices, advice from national and international experts, and national consultation. Through national consultation on implementation examples of existing best practices have been uncovered, and the national conversation in education has begun to build ground swell on teachers performance and development creating a national culture that values the performance and development of teachers, and generation of a genuine and effective environment for the implementation of effective teacher performance and development practices across the nation. Expected outcomesBuild a shared understanding of effective approaches to teacher performance and development to improve outcomes for all young Australians Materials required The presentation will be enhanced if participants have access to the following documentation:Australian Teacher Performance and Development Framework (the Framework) The Framework Frequently Asked Questions The Framework Fact Sheet National Professional Standards for Teachers (the Standards) National Professional Standard for Principals (the Standard) Australian Charter for the Professional Learning of Teachers and School Leaders (the Charter)
  • Purpose Give participants an overview of the role of AITSLKey points to share The Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL) was established on 1 January 2010 to provide national leadership for the Commonwealth, state and territory governments in promoting excellence in the profession of teaching and school leadership. The Ministerial Council agreed at its meeting on 14 October 2011 thatAITSL collaborate with education stakeholders to develop a national framework for teacher development and performance. AITSL work with the education community to:Set and maintain standards for excellence in teaching and school leadershipLead and influence excellence in teaching and school leadershipSupport and recognise excellence in teaching and school leadershipAITSL do not: act as a regulator, produce educational resources for use by children, employ teachers or formulate the national curriculum
  • Purpose To demonstrate that there is a collective responsibility for this important work – it is ambition around this that will take the education profession forwardKey points to share Quote from the slide: In today’s global economy, countries need high-quality education systems that will teach their citizens the skills necessary to meet the challenges of tomorrow The video provides insight into approaches taken internationally, to stimulate discussion about priorities for Australia Featuring in this video are Brazil, Singapore and Ontario however a suite of full length videos can be found at the address on the slideMaterials requiredPreview the OECDStrong Performers and Successful Reformers in Education videoBackground researchGlobalisation and technological change are placing greater demands on education and skill development in Australia and the nature of jobs available to young Australians is changing faster than ever. Skilled jobs now dominate jobs growth and people with university or vocational education and training qualifications fare much better in the employment market than early school leavers. To maximise their opportunities for healthy, productive and rewarding futures, Australia’s young people must be encouraged not only to complete secondary education, but also to proceed intofurther training and education. (Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians can be found at: http://www.mceecdya.edu.au/verve/_resources/National_Declaration_on_the_Educational_Goals_for_Young_Australians.pdf )
  • Purpose Highlight to participants that Australia is positioning itself to be a world leader in educationKey points to shareAustralia holds an enviable position globally. Not only do we have National Professional Standards for Teachers and Principals developed and endorsed by the profession, we can now also take pride in a national vision for teacher performance that is firmly grounded in development and learning. The national education reform agenda has resulted in the following policies which demonstrate a consistent approach in all jurisdictions for all teachers across the country:National Professional Standards for Teachers National Professional Standard for Principals Nationally consistent approach to the accreditation of initial teacher education programs Nationally consistent approach to teacher registration Australian Teacher Performance and Development Framework Australian Charter for the Professional Learning of Teachers and School LeadersAdditional researchOver the next decade Australia should aspire to improve outcomes for all young Australians to become second to none amongst the world’s best school systems.Together, all Australian governments commit to working with all school sectors and the broader community to achieve the educational goals for young Australians.(Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians can be found at: http://www.mceecdya.edu.au/verve/_resources/National_Declaration_on_the_Educational_Goals_for_Young_Australians.pdf )
  • PurposeDraw participants attention to the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians which is the policy driven for the national education reforms taking placeKey points to share The Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians makes clear that Australia aspires not to be among the best in the world, but to be the best. It acknowledges the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century and provides two simple, but powerful, goals to guide Australian education – see slide This speaks to the unequivocal evidence that the quality of teaching is the most significant in-school factor affecting student outcomes In the 21st century Australia’s capacity to provide a high quality of life for all will depend on the ability to compete in the global economy on knowledge and innovation. Education equipsyoung people with the knowledge, understanding, skills and values to take advantage of opportunity and to face the challenges of this era with confidence. Schools play a vital role in promoting the intellectual, physical, social, emotional, moral, spiritual and aesthetic development and wellbeing of young Australians, and in ensuring the nation’s ongoing economic prosperity and social cohesion. Schools share this responsibility with students, parents, carers, families, the community, business and other education and training providers. In recognition of this collective responsibility, this declaration, in contrast to earlier declarations on schooling, has a broader frame and sets out educational goals for young Australians.Materials required The Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians can be found at: http://www.mceecdya.edu.au/verve/_resources/National_Declaration_on_the_Educational_Goals_for_Young_Australians.pdf Background researchThe teachers and leaders who work in Australia’s schools and educate young people are of fundamental importance to achieving these educational goals for young Australians. Excellent teachers have the capacity to transform the lives of students and to inspire and nurture their development as learners, individuals and citizens. They provide an additional source of encouragement, advice and support for students outside the home, shaping teaching around the ways different students learn and nurturing the unique talents of every student.(Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians can be found at: http://www.mceecdya.edu.au/verve/_resources/National_Declaration_on_the_Educational_Goals_for_Young_Australians.pdf )
  • Purpose This question hopes to elicit references to the schools’ mission / vision / strategic plan / reflect elements of the school’s profile and capture their hopes and dreams for the futureExpected outcomes A shared vision as to how to move forward as a team and acknowledgement of and focus on the schools priorities Duration10 – 15 minutesMaterials required The‘Vision’ worksheet (the best size is A3 to allow the facilitator to collate the ideas from the groups to then display them) Please note: This question may need to be altered to fit the context for the group with which you are working – i.e. If all participants are not from the same schoolWork as a table group to brainstorm your responses
  • Purpose Place an emphasis on the effect of quality teaching and importance of appraisal and feedback, and that appraisal and feedback is not currently happening for all Australian teachersKey points to shareInternationally, there is unequivocal evidence that the quality of teaching is the most significant in-school factor affecting student outcomes There is also strong evidence that better appraisal and feedback leading to targeted development can improve teacher performance Positive message:teachers want effective feedbackteachers want support to develop and improve (both newly qualified and experienced teachers) Although Australian teachers, according to OECD research, are not receiving the effective feedback they require, Australia is not alone in this – most OECD countries are the same, although there are pockets of excellence across sectors (Talis, 2009)Teachers are telling us that they work in systems that do not develop their skills or address weaknesses in their schools. They are bearing the burden of systems that fail to recognise effectiveness and therefore reward ineffectiveness. Change is clearly needed if we are to revitalise our school education system. We will lose our best teachers if change does not occur and we will continue to fail to attract the best and brightest into teaching. And the greatest impact will be on students. Students gain the greatest benefit from effective teaching and they lose the most from ineffective teaching. (Grattan, 2010)Teachers who do receive appraisal and feedback view it positively: they want both to help them develop their practices. The vast majority of teachers (83%) agree that the appraisal and feedback they have received are fair (83%) and helpful in the development of their work (79%). Expected outcomesParticipants to see the need for a national FrameworkAdditional researchSpecifically, teacher performance has been shown to improve when the following conditions are present:- opportunities for teacher self-reflection and objective setting (including methods for self-assessment);- regular classroom observation and the provision of constructive feedback from both their school leader or manager, as well as their peers;- frequent feedback on classroom performance as an ongoing dialogue, not a once a year discussion;- shadowing, coaching and mentoring from peers and leaders;opportunities to contribute to and engage in teamwork, collaboration and action learning with other teachers to obtain the best possible outcomes for students.(Hay Group 2012, Growing our potential: Hay Group’s view on implementing an effective performance improvement and development framework for teachers)Teachers who do receive appraisal and feedback view it positively: they want both to help them develop their practices. The vast majority of teachers (83%) agree that the appraisal and feedback they have received are fair (83%) and helpful in the development of their work (79%).OECD, Teaching in Focus 2012/01 (May)Teachers are the most important resource in Australian schools. Differences in teacher effectiveness account for a large proportion of differences in student outcomes – far larger than differences between schools. In fact, outside of family background, teacher effectiveness is the largest factor influencing student outcomes. (B Jensen, Better teacher appraisal and feedback, Grattan Institute, 2011)
  • PurposeTo have participants understand that this is being asked for by Australian teachers and the education community across the nation Key points to shareConservative estimates suggest that students with a highly effective teacher learn twice as much as students with a less effective teacher. Emphasis needs to be placed not on the figures but on the needs being expressed by the teachers – more focused feedback and more targeted support. 63% of teachers believe that appraisals of their work are done purely to meet administrative requirements 61% of teachers report that teacher appraisal has little impact on the way they teach in the classroom and provides them with little or no idea of how to improve their performance (OECD Reviews of evaluation and assessment in education: Australia, 2009) Australian teachers regularly express dissatisfaction with the external delivery professional development model because whilst it heightens their awareness that change or improvement is needed it doesn’t enable them to implement and sustain improved teaching practices once they return to their school (P Cole, IARTV paper, 2004)Expected outcomesBuilding a shared excitement for effective professional dialogue across the nationMaterials required OECD link for further information - http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/1/44/48519807.pdf Peter Cole link for further information - http://local37.teachers.ab.ca/SiteCollectionDocuments/Local37/2009-2010/Notices%20and%20registration%20forms/Rpt%20-%20Joint%20PD%20Framework%20Attachment%20X.pdfAdditional researchAll studies show that the key to higher performing students is the effectiveness of their teachers. Conservative estimates suggest that students with a highly effective teacher learn twice as much as students with a less effective teacher. Systems of teacher appraisal and feedback that are directly linked to improved classroom teaching and student performance can increase teacher effectiveness by as much as 20 to 30%. This would lift the performance of Australia’s students to the best in the world.(B Jensen, Better teacher appraisal and feedback, Grattan Institute, 2011)
  • PurposeGet participants to delve into and begin to understand the Melbourne Declaration Key points to share This speaks to the unequivocal evidence that the quality of teaching is the most significant in-school factor affecting student outcomes Presenter may like to enlarge on the following extracts from the Melbourne Declaration pages 4 – 5. “In the 21st century Australia’s capacity to provide a high quality of life for all will depend on the ability to compete in the global economy on knowledge and innovation. Education equips young people with the knowledge, understandings, skills and values to take advantage of opportunity and to face the challenges of this era with confidence.” As a nation Australia values the central role of education in building a democratic, equitable and just society that is prosperous, cohesive and culturally diverse, and that values Australia’s Indigenous cultures as a key part of the nation’s history, present and future.” “The Melbourne Declaration acknowledges major changes in the world that are placing new demands on Australian education.Global integration and international mobility have increased rapidly in the past decade.India, China and other Asian nations are growing and their influence on the world is increasing.Globalisation and technological change are placing greater demands on education and skill development in Australia.Complex environmental, social and economic pressures such as climate change that extend beyond national borders pose unprecedented challenges, requiring countries to work together in new ways.Rapid and continuing advances in information and communication technologies (ICT) are changing the ways people share, use, develop and process information and technology.Materials required The Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians (the Melbourne Declaration) can be found at: http://www.mceecdya.edu.au/verve/_resources/National_Declaration_on_the_Educational_Goals_for_Young_Australians.pdf
  • PurposeGet participants to focus on what quality teachers aim to achieve Key points to share “In striving for both equity and excellence, there are several areas in which Australian school education needs to make significant improvement. First, Australia has failed to improve educational outcomes for many Indigenous Australians and addressing this issue must be a key priority over the next decade. Second, by comparison with the world’s highest performing school systems, Australian students from low socioeconomic backgrounds are under-represented among high achievers and over represented among low achievers. Third, there is room for improvement in Australia’s rate of Year 12 completion or equivalent.” After reading the Goal 1 statement use the worksheet to respond to the questionsExpected outcomes Working towards building a shared vision of where the school is at currently and what they may choose to focus on in the futureDuration 20 minutes Materials required ACTIVITY sheet: Australian schooling promotes equity and excellence worksheet from the Facilitators pack (the best size is A3 to allow the facilitator to collate and display ideas from the groups)
  • PurposeKey points to shareAITSL has collaborated with education stakeholders to develop the Australian Teacher Performance and Development Framework. The Framework has been developed based on research, national mapping and analysis of existing practices, advice from national and international experts, and national consultation. Through national consultation on implementation examples of existing best practices have been uncovered, and the national conversation in education has begun to build ground swell on teachers performance and development creating a national culture that values the performance and development of teachers, and generation of a genuine and effective environment for the implementation of effective teacher performance and development practices across the nation. The Framework highlights what is required to build a comprehensive and effective approach to high performance and development.  It outlines the characteristics of a successful system and the culture that needs to be in place for sustained improvements to occur in schools – this focuses on each of the components. It describes the characteristics of an effective performance and development cycle, including the elements of the cycle that are essential for success and should be implemented in all Australian schools. The Framework will provide a structure for appraising, developing and improving teaching practice as well as recognising the entitlement of teachers to meaningful feedback and support.Expected outcomesDurationMaterials required
  • Purpose Introduction of the Framework Key points to shareCalls for the creation of a culture in all schools:with a clear focus on improving teachingas the means of improving student outcomesand requires that teachers;know what is expected of themreceive frequent feedback and have access to high quality support Aims to promote genuine professional conversationsThe Framework highlights what is required to build a comprehensive and effective approach to high performance and development.  It outlines the characteristics of a successful system and the culture that needs to be in place for sustained improvements to occur in schools.  It describes the characteristics of an effective performance and development cycle, including the elements of the cycle that are essential for success and should be implemented in all Australian schools. The Framework will provide a structure for appraising, developing and improving teaching practice as well as recognising the entitlement of teachers to meaningful feedback and support.Materials required Read page 2 of the FrameworkAdditional researchUltimately, culture and leadership are going to be reinforced by successful outcomes. Where a robust framework is supported by enabling factors and strong local leadership in a conducive culture, it is likely that performance and development discussion will lead to growth, development and improvement in teachers and in turn to improving student learning. (Hay Group 2012, Growing our potential: Hay Group’s view on implementing an effective performance improvement and development framework for teachers)For teachers who report receiving appraisal and feedback, many report changes in their teaching practices, especially on their emphasis on improving student test scores, student discipline, and classroom management(OECD, Teaching in Focus 2012/01 (May))
  • Purpose Highlight the four areas of the Framework document Key points to shareThe Framework highlights what is required to build a comprehensive and effective approach to high performance and development.  It outlines the characteristics of a successful system and the culture that needs to be in place for sustained improvements to occur in schools.  It describes the characteristics of an effective performance and development cycle, including the elements of the cycle that are essential for success and should be implemented in all Australian schools. The Framework will provide a structure for appraising, developing and improving teaching practice as well as recognising the entitlement of teachers to meaningful feedback and support.
  • Purpose Have participants focus on the need for all these factors to be in place for supportive culture to flourish in schoolsKey points to share The Framework highlights what is required to build a comprehensive and effective approach to high performance and development.  It outlines the characteristics of a successful system and the culture that needs to be in place for sustained improvements to occur in schools. Detail on the culture components:A focus on student outcomes -Improving teaching is not an end in itself. It is directed at improving outcomes for students. Itis important that this focus infuses any approach to teacher performance and development. This is not an argument for simplistic approaches that tie evaluation of teaching directly to single outcome measures. It is, however, a call for everything thatteachers do, and that is done to support them, to be linked to increasing the positive impact of teaching on students. This Framework defines student outcomes broadly to include student learning, engagement in learning and wellbeing, and acknowledges that these can be measured in a variety of ways.A clear understanding of effective teaching – to focus on improving teaching, it is necessary to have a clear vision of what effective teaching looks like. TheNational Professional Standards for Teachers outline what teachers should know and be able to do at four career stages. These Standards present a comprehensive picture of the elements of effective teaching covering the three domains of professional knowledge, professional practice and professional engagement. The Standards provide a broad picture of the work of teachers. Schools, and individual teachers within them, are unlikely to be focusing on all areas of the Standards at once. Rather, the Standards should be seen as providing the basis and a common language for coming to a shared understanding of what effective teaching looks like in the context of a particular school at a particular time. This understanding of effective teaching will be shaped by the school’s context and priorities. Leadership - research is clear not only on the importance of school leadership in improving school performance, but also on the critical role of leaders in creating a culture of performance and development. The National Professional Standard for Principalsmakes clear the role of the principal in leading teaching and learning, developing him or herself and others, and leading improvement in a school. All these elements are central to a performance and development culture. While it is acknowledged that principals have a central role, a performance and development culture cannot be driven by one person alone. Leadership must come from all levels, from those with and without formal leadership positions. A truly effective approach is characterised by a shared commitment to improvement and an acceptance that teachers have a powerful role to play in each others’ development, as well as their own. Flexibility - all schools are different, and need to respond to their unique contexts and histories. Schools vary widely in their existing approaches to teacher performance and development. It is clear that effective implementation takes into account starting points, and that the sequencing of change will be different in different situations. This draft Framework describes the elements of an effective approach to teacher performance and development, but acknowledges that these elements will look different in each school. Coherence – it is important that performance and development processes in a school fit with other arrangements in which schools, teachers and school leaders are involved. Performance and development processes and teacher goals should reflect the overall approach to teaching and learning within a school, and should be consistent with the school plans. It is important that teachers and school leaders experience performance and development as something that ties together the various activities they are engaged in, rather than a separate and additional process. Alignment to school plans and school-wide approaches to professional learning are particularly important.Performance and development culture – research is unambiguous in showing that a successful approach to effective performance and development relies on creating a strong and supportive culture in a school. Formal performance and development procedures are important but excessive attention to process is a common feature of less successful approaches. It is therefore important to focus on the factors that need to be in place for a performance and development culture to flourish.Additional researchTo introduce and sustain an effective school-based P&D system, a culture must exist among school leaders and teachers that is open to feedback and serious about performance and development—that is, a culture that sees performance management as much more than ticking boxes and development as much more than gaining credentials. The need for such a culture to exist makes it very difficult simply to impose a P&D system from the centre, however close such a system might be to 'best practice'.(The Boston Consulting Group, Delivering Real Change in the Approach to Performance and Development in Schools)Our research suggests that human resources–such as openness to improvement, trust and respect, teachers having knowledge and skills, supportive leadership and socialization–are more critical to the development of professional community than structural conditions. (Kruse, S, Louis, K & A Bryk 1994, Building professional community in schools, Issues in restructuring schools)
  • Purpose Introduce the components of an effective performance & development cycleKey points to share The cycle describes the characteristics of an effective performance and development cycle, including the elements of the cycle that are essential for success and should be implemented in all Australian schools. The Framework will provide a structure for appraising, developing and improving teaching practice as well as recognising the entitlement of teachers to meaningful feedback and support. Performance and development occurs in a cycle which provides a focus for appraising, developing and refining teaching and recognising the entitlements of teachers to receive feedback and support Elements of the cycle are interwoven, will not necessarily occur in order and may take more or less time depending on circumstances However, the cycle provides a useful way of thinking about the process, and assists in identifying its important elementsMaterials required For further information read pages5 - 7 of the FrameworkBackground research3.1 TALIS – teachers aren’t getting effective appraisalDespite the importance of teacher appraisal and feedback, the majority of teachers are not getting it. An OECD survey of lower secondary teachers showed that, in Australia, current systems of teacher evaluation are largely seen as bureaucratic exercises, not linked to teacher development or improved classroom teaching: • 63% of Australian teachers report that appraisal of their work is largely done simply to fulfil administrative requirements; and• 61% report that appraisal of their work has little impact on the way they teach in the classroom. The current systems of teacher appraisal and feedback do not identify nor recognise effective or innovative teaching in schools:• 91% of teachers report that in their school, the most effective teachers do not receive the greatest recognition;• 92% report that if they improved the quality of their teaching they would not receive any recognition in their school; and• 91% report that if they were more innovative in their teaching they would not receive any recognition in their school. TALIS is the OECD’s Teaching and Learning International Survey. See OECD(2009); Jensen (2010).
  • Purpose Provide participants with an overview of the essential elements for effective teacher performance and development Key points to shareThe essential elements are derived from research and existing effective practice:Reflection and goal settingAll teachers have a set of documented and regularly reviewed goals related to both performance and development, and ways of measuring progress towards them, that are agreed with the principal or delegate. Professional practice and learningAll teachers are supported in working towards their goals, including through access to high quality professional learning.Evidence used to reflect on and evaluate teacher performance, including through the full review described below, should come from multiple sources and include as a minimum: data showing impact on student outcomes; information based on direct observation of teaching; and evidence of collaboration with colleagues. Feedback and reviewAll teachers receive regular formal and informal feedback on their performance. This includes a formal review against their performance and development goals at least annually, with verbal and written feedback being provided to the teacher.Materials required Familiarity with the essential elementsin the Framework – pages 5 – 7
  • PurposeDemonstrate the connection between processes that teachers undertake as part of their professional growth Key points to share The diagram shows that the Australian Teacher Performance and Development Framework is supported by the National Professional Standards for Teachers, the National Professional Standard for Principals and the Australian Charter for the Professional Learning of Teachers and School Leaders This means that the Framework is consistent with registration and renewal of registration, certification as a Highly Accomplished or Lead teacher, and can be used to support those aiming for career progressionFurther detail The Ministerial Council agreed at its meeting on 14 October 2011 that AITSL collaborate with education stakeholders to develop a national framework for teacher development and performance. The Teacher Standards:AITSL consulted broadly in the development/finalisation of the Standards [Implementation Focus Group; Focus Group of the Profession; Specialist advisors on ATSI, rural/remote, low SES; and Teacher Standards Quality Assurance Committee] Endorsed by MCEECDYA in December 2010 Launched by AITSL in February 2011Aims of the Teacher Standards:Inform the development of professional learning goals Provide a framework by which teachers can judge the success of their learning Assist in self-reflection and self-assessmentThe Principal Standards:Endorsed by MCEECDYA in July 2011Aim of the Principal Standards: A public statement which sets out what principals are expected to know, understand and do to achieve in their work Provides a framework for professional learning A basis to inform strategies for attracting, preparing and developing principals for leading 21st Century Schools Guide to self-reflection, self-assessment and development Guide to inform the management of self and othersMaterials required Become familiar with the diagram – read page 8 of theFramework
  • PurposeProvide participants with some information about the Australian Charter for the Professional Learning of Teachers and School LeadersKey points to share Affirms the central importance of professional learning to teacher quality and student learning Recognises the importance of culture and context Articulates the expectation that professionals actively engage in professional learning throughout their careers Describes three key characteristics of professional learning:relevantcollaborativefuture focused The Charter calls on teachers, school leaders and system leaders to take actionFurther detail on the Charter The Charter describes 3 key characteristics of effective professional learning:effective professional learning is relevant because improving student outcomes is the ultimate goal of all teachers and school leaders, and of the professional learning they undertake. Professional learning will be most engaging for adult learners and have the greatest impacts on practice when it assists teachers and school leaders to address and adapt to the challenges they face in improving student learning, engagement and wellbeing learning is a collaborative process. Collaboration has a powerful effect in magnifying and spreading the benefits of professional learning and adds a new and valuable dimension to the learning undertaken by individuals. It connects teacher and leaders to their colleagues within and across schools and to external experts. Effective collaboration demands a disciplined and purposeful approach to collaborating to solve the challenges that are most important to improving student outcomesa future focused approach to professional learning seeks to develop teachers and school leaders who are adaptable and able to deal with new and unexpected challenges. It exposes teachers to new and emerging practices and the theories that underpin them. It should focus not simply on improving existing practice, but also on assisting teachers and school leaders to understand the theory behind what practices work in different situations, and when and how to apply a broad repertoire of strategies. There is clear evidence that purposeful professional learning for teachers and school leaders is one of the most effective strategies for improving student outcomes in our schools. The professional learning undertaken will vary to suit the context and priorities of teachers, leaders, schools, systems and sectors but the imperative to engage actively in high quality professional learning remains the same. The Charter defines effective professional learning as a shared responsibility that must be taken up at all levels of the education system – by teachers, school leaders, system leaders and policy makers. Changing culture and professional practices is not easy and will require sustained effort.Additional research Australian teachers regularly express dissatisfaction with the external delivery professional development model because whilst it heightens their awareness that change or improvement is needed it doesn’t enable them to implement and sustain improved teaching practices once they return to their school (P Cole, IARTV paper, 2004)Student outcomesFocusing on student learning needs helped teachers to identify what they needed to learn to improve outcomes for students and gave them a compelling reason to engage in research. The most powerful element of the process was checking whether any changes in practice were having the desired impact on valued student outcomes. (Bell, Cordingley, Isham and Davis, 2010)Seven themes for professional learning that has an impact on student outcomes: (Timperley, Wilson, Barrar and Fung, 2007) Learning opportunities for teachers occurred over an extended period of time Involvement of external experts was more related to success than within school initiatives Important to deepen teachers knowledge and extend their skills in ways that improved student outcomes Challenge teachers’ prevailing discourse and conceptions about learning Teachers talking to teachers about teaching When school leadership supported opportunities to learn Funding, release time, and whether involvement was voluntary or compulsory was unrelated to influences on student outcomes“nearly 60 percent of a school’s impact on student achievement is attributable to principal and teacher effectiveness. These are the most important in-school factors driving school success, with principals accounting for 25 percent and teachers 33 percent of a school’s total impact on achievement.” This statement may even understate the potential impact of effective school leadership, because leadership is itself one of the main drivers of the quality of teaching. (Barber, Whelan and Clark, 2010)RelevantTeacher development needs to be linked with wider goals of school and system development, and with appraisal and feedback practices and school evaluation. (OECD, 2011)CollaborativeCollaborative practice is all about teachers and school leaders working together to develop effective instructional practices, studying what works well in classroom, and doing so both with rigorous attention to detail and with a commitment to improving not only one’s own practice but that of others. (Cordingley, Bell, Thomason and Firth, 2005)Future focusedThe majority of the interventions which practitioners implemented as part of their research activity in education were applied interventions. That is they went beyond knowledge acquisition into the development of the pedagogical understanding and skills needed to change practice. They involved the application of new or different approaches to teaching and learning, including (in a small number of academic studies) the application of research to the development of subject knowledge or curriculum development. (Bell, Cordingley, Isham and Davis, 2010)
  • PurposeGet participants to focus on what quality teachers aim to achieve Key points to share “In striving for both equity and excellence, there are several areas in which Australian school education needs to make significant improvement. First, Australia has failed to improve educational outcomes for many Indigenous Australians and addressing this issue must be a key priority over the next decade. Second, by comparison with the world’s highest performing school systems, Australian students from low socioeconomic backgrounds are under-represented among high achievers and over represented among low achievers. Third, there is room for improvement in Australia’s rate of Year 12 completion or equivalent.” After reading the Goal 1 statement use the worksheet to respond to the questionsExpected outcomes Working towards building a shared vision of where the school is at currently and what they may choose to focus on in the futureDuration 20 minutes Materials required ACTIVITY sheet: Australian schooling promotes equity and excellence worksheet from the Facilitators pack (the best size is A3 to allow the facilitator to collate and display ideas from the groups)
  • Purpose Closing key point to refocus participants on why we as a nation are focusing on improving the teaching professionKey messageAs students are the future of our nation, it is the responsibility of all Australians to ensure that all young people receive the best education they can access, and that means having the best teachers in all classrooms in our schools. To support our education system to rise and become the best in the world, we must support our teachers to continually grow and develop as professionals in the 21st century.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Australian Teacher Performance and Development FrameworkImplementing effective teacher performance and development in our schools
    • 2. In today’s global economy, countries need high-quality education systemsthat will teach their citizens the skills necessary to meet the challenges oftomorrow Strong Performers and Successful Reformers in Education, © OECD, 2011 http://www.oecd.org/document/7/0,3746,en_2649_35845621_49428807_1_1_1_1,00.html
    • 3. Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians,2008> Goal 1: Australian schooling promotes equity and excellence> Goal 2: All young Australians become: – successful learners – confident and creative individuals – active and informed citizens
    • 4. What should webe trying to achievein our school?
    • 5. > Quality of teaching> Improvement in student outcomes> Significant in-school factor> Better appraisal and feedback> Targeted development
    • 6. The foundationStudies show that moreeffective teachers are The motivationthe key to producing Australian teachershigher performing report that they do notstudents. always get the feedbackB Jensen, Better teacher appraisal andfeedback, Grattan Institute, 2011 they need to improve
    • 7. Goal 1:Australian schooling promotes equity and excellence
    • 8. After reading the Goal 1 statement, use the worksheet torespond to the following questions…> In what ways does your school community demonstrate its commitment to promoting equity and excellence?> What further steps could be taken?
    • 9. Hold slide – animation
    • 10. Focuses all schools on:> a creation of culture> improving teaching> improving student outcomes> teachers receiving frequent feedback> providing access to high quality support, and> promoting genuine professional conversations.
    • 11. > A culture of performance and development> Performance and development cycle including essential elements> Importance of implementation
    • 12. > Focus on student outcomes> A clear understanding of effective teaching> Leadership> Flexibility> Coherence
    • 13. > Reflection and goal setting> Feedback and review> Professional practice and learning
    • 14. All teachers…> Set performance and development goals> Supported in working towards their goals> Collect evidence to reflect on and evaluate> Receive feedback, including formal review
    • 15. > Dual purpose: - Improvement - Accountability> Maps progression across career stages: - Graduate - Proficient - Highly Accomplished - Lead
    • 16. How closely do theprofessional learningcultures of schools andpractices of teachers andschool leaders currentlyalign with the purpose andkey features of the Charter?

    ×