Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Ivc 2013-1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Ivc 2013-1

151

Published on

Cermet coating deposition by DC reactive co-sputtering process controlled by voltage …

Cermet coating deposition by DC reactive co-sputtering process controlled by voltage

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
151
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Cermet coating deposition by DC reactive co-sputtering process controlled by voltage aintech@ain.es
  • 2. Cermet coating deposition by DC reactive co-sputtering process controlled by voltage Beatriz Navarcorena, Julián Rodrigo, Gonzalo G. Fuentes, José A. García, Ramón Escobar, Carlos Prieto, José Angel Sánchez, Eva Céspedes, J. M. Albella IVC-19 2013 – September 9-13, Paris, FRANCE
  • 3. Index 1 Objective 2 Introduction 3 Selective coating design 4 Deposition and characterization 5 Conclusions
  • 4. Index 1 Objective 2 Introduction 3 Selective coating design 4 Deposition and characterization 5 Conclusions
  • 5. Objective To develop coating a solar selective for the parabolic trough solar collectors that allows the operating temperature of the transfer fluid to reach 600ºC, and to develop an application method for them (PVD).
  • 6. Index 1 Objective 2 Introduction 3 Selective coating design 4 Deposition and characterization 5 Conclusions
  • 7. Introduction Parabolic trough solar collector Parabolic mirror Absorber tube
  • 8. Introduction Key component: Absorber tube AR-coated glass tube (high solar transmittance) Glass-to-metal seal Selective absorber coating (high solar absorptance and low thermal emittance) Vacuum Insulation (minimized heat convection losses)
  • 9. Introduction ↑ Solar absorptance 1,44 µm ↓ Thermal emissivity
  • 10. Index 1 Objective 2 Introduction 3 Selective coating design 4 Deposition and characterization 5 Conclusions
  • 11. Selective coating design Literature review Anti-reflection coating LMVF cermet absorbing layer HMVF cermet absorbing layer IR-reflective metal Substrate
  • 12. Selective coating design Our stack SiO2 SiO2:Mo (LMVF) SiO2:Mo (HMVF) IR-reflective metal (Ag) Stainless steel
  • 13. Selective coating design Software simulations To optimize the optical parameters Dependence with the metal volume fraction Dependence with the cermet thickness SiO2 64 nm LMVF-20% 70 nm HMVF-40% 113 nm Ag
  • 14. Index 1 Objective 2 Introduction 3 Selective coating design 4 Deposition and characterization 5 Conclusions
  • 15. Selective coating deposition DC-Reactive Magnetron Sputtering Elemental targets: Al, Ti, Si, etc. Reactive gases: O2, N2, etc. Inert gases: Ar, etc. SiO2, Al2O3, Si3N2… HYSTERESIS EFFECT
  • 16. Selective coating deposition The hysteresis effect Constant power Metallic mode Voltage Reactive mode Reactive gas flow rate
  • 17. Selective coating deposition The hysteresis effect Control Methods Increasing the pumping speed Increasing the target-to–substrate distance Obstructing reactive gas flow to the cathode Pulsed reactive gas flow Plasma emission monitoring Voltage control I.Safi “Recent aspects concerning DC reactive magnetron sputtering of thin films: a review” Surface and Coatings Technology 127 (2000) 203-219
  • 18. Selective coating deposition The hysteresis effect Stoichiometry K.Koski et al. “Voltage controlled reactive sputerring process for aluminium oxide thin films” Thin Solid Films 326 (1998) 189-193
  • 19. Selective coating deposition position The hysteresis effect Deposition rate K.Koski et al. “Voltage controlled reactive sputerring process for aluminium oxide thin films” Thin Solid Films 326 (1998) 189-193
  • 20. Selective coating deposition The hysteresis effect Control method used speedflo™ Mini is a multichannel closed-loop control system for high speed adjustment of a reactive gas for magnetron sputter processes.
  • 21. Selective coating deposition The hysteresis effect SiO2 Power Si constant = 2000 W loop point of maximal deposition rate
  • 22. Selective coating deposition Characterization by FTIR: SiO2
  • 23. Selective coating deposition The hysteresis effect SiO2:Mo In co-Sputtering, the hysteresis loop of Si target changes when the Mo target is on
  • 24. Selective coating deposition Silicon power (W) 23 3000 60 4000 97 1000 2000 Deposition rate (nm/min) 1000 1000 Molybdenum power (W) 45 2000 62 3000 83 4000 111
  • 25. Selective coating deposition Characterization by ellipsometry Si(1000W):Mo(4000W)
  • 26. Selective coating deposition Optical simulations with real optical values
  • 27. Selective coating deposition Silicon power (W) 23 3000 60 4000 97 HMVF 1000 2000 Deposition rate (nm/min) 1000 1000 Molybdenum power (W) 45 LMVF 2000 62 3000 83 4000 111
  • 28. Selective coating deposition Layer Material MVF Thickness (nm) IR mirror Ag - 250 HMVF cermet Mo/ SiO2 0.28 100 LMVF cermet Mo/ SiO2 0.1 90 AR layer SiO2 - 50
  • 29. Optical characterization of the stack FTIR dual MIR/NIR Spectrometer Rango: NIR: 11000-3000 cm-1 (0.9 - 3.3 µm) MIR: 4000-400 cm-1 (2.5 – 25 µm) UV-Vis-NIR Spectrophotometer Range: 200 nm – 3.3 mm
  • 30. Optical characterization of the stack Sample Up-scaled Temperature λ2 ∫λ 1 A(λ ) ε thn 0,804 0,047 0,804 0,076 0,804 0,111 650 °C α sol 0,025 600 °C ∫ (θ , T ) = λ 0,804 500 °C 1 0,001 400 °C ∫λ [1 − R(λ ,θ )]A(λ ) = 0,804 300 °C λ2 ε2 RT λ2 α2 0,804 0,130 E (T , λ )[1 − RS (λ ,θ )]dλ 1 λ2 ∫λ 1 E (T , λ )dλ
  • 31. Index 1 Objective 2 Introduction 3 Selective coating design 4 Deposition and characterization 5 Conclusions
  • 32. Conclusions DC-reactive sputtering technique has important advantages for depositing multipurpose oxide films controlled by voltage. DC-reactive Magnetron process requires fast control methods in order to obtain high deposition rates with the desired stoichiometry, and with a low reactive gas flow rate. High value CSP technology stack architecture can be achieved by cosputtering with a previous optical simulation.
  • 33. Acknowledgments The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme. Thanks for your attention!

×