97 Columbia St, Suite 3                                                Cambridge, MA                                      ...
Contents            Executive SummaryExecutive Summary          3        IntroductionIntroduction               4        A...
Executive SummaryThe purpose of this white paper is to:1. Scrutinize the current solutions being used in   many firms and ...
IntroductionRelationships are ever increasing. Every day the world is becoming more and moreglobal. We are now able to com...
Analyzing the Problem: The Model of FailureLet’s examine the problem and its source.•   53% of employees do not trust uppe...
AIM Leadership ModelThe AIM Leadership Model is a much more comprehensive, sustainable model than theprevious. That’s not ...
choosing your emotions, focus, reference, and response. You must know yourself sothat you can be true to who YOU are, do w...
Step 3. INTERDEPENDANT AUTHENTICITY: Creating Synergy and SustainabilityClarity of focus and outcomes is essential to maxi...
Case Study #1Sarah had worked for a multinational Fortune XX corporation for over 20 years when she wasreferred to AIM Lea...
With a few significant wins on the home front, Sarah was less stressed, more trusting of the AIMcoach and more open to lea...
Case Study #2	  Highly self-aware and self-motivated, Meghan sought out leadership development.Professionally successful, ...
to focus on the deals and his track records. Soon associates and clients wanted to meet withMeghan instead of Joe, and wit...
Conclusion                                       	  In the information age, people are a company’s greatest resource. By l...
Outcomes of AIM ClientsSelf-knowledge is core to leadership effectiveness. How well do your leadersknow themselves? How we...
Are your associates adapting and evolving in the global economy? Are you?  AIM Clients:     Leverage emotional intelligenc...
Highlights from our Ebook SeriesAIM Leaderships uses eBooks to quickly distribute effective strategies to improveleadershi...
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Sustaining High Performance Aim

  1. 1. 97 Columbia St, Suite 3 Cambridge, MA 202-422-6153 http://www.aimleadership.comAIMing for Sustainable High Performance People Are Your Greatest Resource: The AIM Leadership Model for Executive Success
  2. 2. Contents Executive SummaryExecutive Summary 3 IntroductionIntroduction 4 An Introduction to today’s workplaceAnalyzing the Problem 5 Analyzing the ProblemAIM Leadership Model 6 What troubles are managers/leadersCase Studies 8 facing in today’s workplace?AIM Offerings 12 What models are unsuccessful executives using and why are theyOutcomes of AIM Clients 13 counterproductive? AIM Leadership Model for Success What is the AIM Leadership Model? Why is it so effective? Strategies for Success Information about our ebooks. Case Studies AIM Offerings How can you implement the AIM Leadership Model going forward? 2
  3. 3. Executive SummaryThe purpose of this white paper is to:1. Scrutinize the current solutions being used in many firms and corporations today. “A business that The current solution is outdated and focused makes nothing purely on the short-term results. While profits are but money is a often the ultimate goal, the path to get there has poor business.” changed dramatically in the past decade. - Henry Ford2. Highlight the shortcomings of these solutions that are being overly/ineffectively used today. In today’s business world, leaders must take into account the WHO and HOW, as well as the WHAT.3. Explore why employees are disengaged and punching the clock. Now more than ever employees are working with fear, rather than with passion.4. Discuss the disastrous effects of the current solution. The current solution focuses on the short-term success of companies and does not plan for long-term prosperity.5. Examine a new, more effective and sustainable solution. By updating the model to fit today’s world, companies can address short-term problems with a sustainable solution that provides long-term viability. The AIM model brings balance back to relationships vs. the bottom line, which makes people happier and drives high-performance. In the end, it is a win-win for people and the company. 3
  4. 4. IntroductionRelationships are ever increasing. Every day the world is becoming more and moreglobal. We are now able to communicate with others from the comfort of our homes, aswe travel in our cars, and even as we fly. Today’s leaders lead diverse teams thatcome from different generations, cultures, time zones and geography. These teamshave the technical ability and agility to communicate effectively through a wide range ofmediums such as email, phone, video chat and even in person. And yet there areincreasing challenges to these collaborations where we are not as effective as weshould or could be.For many businesses, “leadership” is focused onmanaging the bottom-line. Executives are pushed to Visions, goals, andincrease profits, reduce costs, and ultimately, do more relationships are putwith less. Instead of cultivating and motivating together in HOPES ofemployees through positive means, managers are achieving profit.constantly pushing employees to “hit the numbers”. Managers do not ALIGNAs a result, leaders are pressed to look for short-term these and are not asshortcuts, often sacrificing future, sustainable benefits effective as they could be.for short-term answers. Unfortunately relationshipsbecome an afterthought, even though they hold thekey to business success. Effective leadershipincludes the following: o Information o Communication o Relationships Executives  are  pressed  to   deliver  results  on  a  daily   basis.    TTherefore,  hey  focus   basis.     herefore,  t they  are   on  short-­‐term  results.    The   focused  on  short-­‐term   results.    The  problem  short-­‐ problem  arises  when   arises   term  results  harm  long-­‐term   when  short-­‐term  results   harm  long-­‐term  value.   value.     4
  5. 5. Analyzing the Problem: The Model of FailureLet’s examine the problem and its source.• 53% of employees do not trust upper management.1• 55% of US employees are passively looking for a new job.1• Businesses spend 25-200% of a sales person’s salary to recruit and train a replacement.2• Disengaged employees cost US companies up to $300 billion every year.3A dangerous trend is occurring in the business world. With globalization, theseinefficiencies are even more hazardous. Customers can quickly move their businesselsewhere if they are not getting a great product at a great value. In the past, manycompanies have used short-term/sighted models to manage teams:In the Industrial-focused age, this model delivered results because it was focused onWHAT. This results-oriented and cost-reducing model was effective in the industrialage when a company’s greatest resource was the equipment. In the new economywhere people are a company’s greatest resource, a new model has emerged. It will beharder to deliver results overtime becauseit overlooks costs to people, relationships,and the process. As the short-term resultserode, managers are left with disengagedemployees who are not working at full-productivity.The old model stresses resources asphysical property such as factories andland. With the rapid movement into avirtual world, physical property has reducedvalue. In its place, the value ofrelationships and importance peoplehave risen dramatically.1 BlessingWhite, The State of Employee Engagement. 20082 American Management Association, Six Truths about Employee Turnover. 20043 Gallup Engagement Study. 2006 5
  6. 6. AIM Leadership ModelThe AIM Leadership Model is a much more comprehensive, sustainable model than theprevious. That’s not to say that the AIM model prioritizes people over profit. In reality, itincorporates people and the bottom-line in a balanced way that provides the bestresults.In addition to delivering results, the WHAT, this AIM Leadership Model also addressesthe HOW and WHO. By focusing on self-knowledge, relationships, and alignment, theAIM Leadership model promotes great results that are sustainable over the long term.Traditionally, management has focused on getting the right results. To maximizeeffectiveness, executives look at how the team is aligned to execute on these results.Again, they focus on the short-term outputs. Effective leaders know that they mustattend to the relationships within their team to get the alignment to get the results.Successful leaders value both the short and the long term results and know that eachindividual must be developed. When individual team members have more selfknowledge, they are more aware and better positioned to cultivate real,transparent relationships. These real relationships, in turn, will drive greatercommunication, conflict resolution, innovation, and thus creating greater alignment.Teams that are aligned in action, value and outcome create the greatest results. TheAIM Leadership Model addresses each of these components, and breaks them downinternally and externally.Step 1. INDIVIDUAL AUTHENTICITY: Connecting Inside, Knowing Yourself OutsideThis first element of self-awareness is just that, knowing the parts that make up who youare. The internal aspects of self knowledge include clarity your values, beliefs,strengths, and weaknesses; awareness of your physiology, habits, and language; and 6
  7. 7. choosing your emotions, focus, reference, and response. You must know yourself sothat you can be true to who YOU are, do what matters, and set yourself up for success.Self knowledge is part external and part interpersonal awareness. It is essential toknow how you connect (rapport, trust, empathy, authenticity); communicate (candor,feedback, vision); collaborate (engage, align, influence, synergy); and celebrate (humor,fun).Step 2. INTERPERSONAL AUTHENTICITY: Creating Real RelationshipsMost people think of relationships occurring between people, but there is a constantlyevolving relationship within yourself and then with others. Much like self-awareness,having a real, authentic relationship with yourself is an important foundation that makesit easier to have genuine relationships with others.Real relationships are essential to transparent, productive communication and are oftentaken for granted. With globalization, creating genuine connections is becoming moredifficult as people are changing jobs more frequently and spending more time workingvirtually or from remote locations. This impacts both the quality and quantity of timespent developing relationships. As opposed to working with robots, one must recognizeand respect their colleagues. Seeing the personal side of an individual facilitateshumanization. This in turn enables real relationships and drives trust.Individuals need to feel they are important and that their work is valued, relevant, andimpactful to the larger organizational mission. 7
  8. 8. Step 3. INTERDEPENDANT AUTHENTICITY: Creating Synergy and SustainabilityClarity of focus and outcomes is essential to maximize effectiveness. While mostbusinesses “align for results,” they often overlook that this is both an internal (values,cultures, accountability) and an external (outcomes, strategies, measurements)process.Most businesses use the “old model” and focus on the What/Results. They lack thedepth and “solidity” of relationship for fierce candid dialogue which is essential forcreating outstanding results.When a true connection is made, a synergy between the individuals moves to a higherlevel where teams and communities are established. Effective teams: o create trust o navigate conflict o maintain accountabilityUltimately the relationships become strong enough to co-create sustainable strategiesand systems.Step 4. INVEST IN PEOPLE, RELATIONSHIPS and TEAMS: Maintain Success OverTime, Through Space, Within Technology:Teams that have real relationships have the foundation for respect: they are able tohave conflict (which is key to making sure they are aligned), and can move towards theirgoals. Internal alignment involves the HOW. The vision, values, culture and strategymust all by in sync for success. The outcomes, priorities, tactics, and expectations mustalso be assembled into a cohesive plan.Technology is continually developing. Successful leaders are able to sustainablydevelop their organizations through the use of new technology.While driving results true leaders alsoinvest in the future. The key is to see thelong-term vision, and to continually investin and empower the people in theorganization. 8
  9. 9. Case Study #1Sarah had worked for a multinational Fortune XX corporation for over 20 years when she wasreferred to AIM Leadership. Having managed a financial team for almost 10 years, Sarah hadbeen demoted two levels and “relieved” of her management responsibilities. She felt she haddelivered what was expected and each year she had performed well on evaluations. Over time,the company’s values had shifted from results to who and how they were delivered.Unfortunately, no one told this to Sarah. Her managers did not give her constructive feedbackon how to become more productive.Not only was Sarah surprised by these demotions, she was embarrassed, confused and feltbetrayed. As the primary bread-winner, Sarah felt obligated to come to coaching and yet, shewas skeptical of “anything corporate.”There were many problems in this situation. During the previous 3 years, Sarah had hadseveral managers. None had prioritized candid developmental feedback. None had created areal relationship with Sarah, where they could understand what they saw as her priority. Andnone were clear enough about their own values in order to constructively deliver difficultfeedback.To complicate matters, during this same time period the corporation transitioned from beingfamily-run to having a CEO from outside the family. Very much aligned with the AIM Model, thenew CEO measured success on the “who and the how” in addition to the “what.” Sarah was stillfocused on the old model and delivering the what. She had missed that the “game changed”and no one had been courageous or honest enough to tell her.Initially Sarah was very skeptical of AIM Leadership. A quiet woman to start, she felt stabbed inthe back by people she thought she could trust. As the primary breadwinner for her family, shefelt she had no choice and yet she was very doubtful of collaborating with AIM. During the firstfour hours of coaching, the conversations barely touched on anything related to Sarah’s work.The AIM coach focused on getting to know Sarah, understanding what was important to her anddeepening the relationship.Not too surprisingly, Sarah shared several challenges on the home front that virtually paralleledher work challenges. As a mother of two teenage sons, she was focused on getting things done(cooking dinner, doing laundry, etc.) and overlooked how she delivered these results. The AIMcoach provided her perspective through questions, reflections, new insights. Not “telling Sarah”– letting Sarah see herself.Through the coaching collaboration Sarah reconnected to what was most important to herself(developing her self-knowledge) and started to see how she was showing up at home (selfawareness). Within a week of making several small yet essential shifts, Sarah saw significantshifts in her boys (they were sharing with her, more communicative, more engaged, workingwith her on projects – rather than against her). 9
  10. 10. With a few significant wins on the home front, Sarah was less stressed, more trusting of the AIMcoach and more open to learning – stretching – and collaborating with the AIM Coach.As she became clearer about what was important and more aware of how she was showing up(as she knew her self better), she was able to adapt, connect and relate more deeply with theboys. Sarah saw the parallel between the challenges at work and home. She had specifictangible wins with what “mattered most”; she could “cross-contextualize” and translate herlearnings from home to the workplace.AIM coaching helped her see that if the coach had come in focused on the “what,” gettingSarah on board to manage the way the company wanted, the collaboration with AIM would havefallen flat on its face. In contrast, the AIM coach was committed to deepening the relationshipwith Sarah: focusing on who she was and what was important to her, - meeting Sarah whereSarah was. (With people you have to go slow to go fast). As Sarah saw the wins and felt“seen” by her coach, the speed and intensity of her learning intensified.She was invigorated, committed and disciplined in her learning. For each person she connectedwith, Sarah began to deepen the relationships before tackling the work problems. Soon shewas seeking out her “challenging relationships,” inviting them to lunch, and getting to know themas individuals. Before large meetings, she scheduled time to think about each person coming tothe table and thought of five things she admired about that person (deepening her relationship /connection to the people involved… not just the worker bees). Within 3 months her boss praisedher shifts. Within 6 months, Sarah was re-instated to her management position.Interestingly, as Sarah was reaping so many rewards, she was also continuing her growth anddevelopment, and connecting more deeply with those around her. People soon came to her tofacilitate their most difficult, contentious meetings. From introverted socially awkward producer,she became a skilled trusted facilitator. The best part is that Sarah did this because she knewit was what was right.     10
  11. 11. Case Study #2  Highly self-aware and self-motivated, Meghan sought out leadership development.Professionally successful, she was aware of her gifts, strengths and talents as well as some ofher “developmental opportunities” that were inhibiting her (both fulfillment and accomplishment).Meghan approached AIM Leadership to “grow herself”. For over two years, Meghan committedto deepening her self-knowledge, skills and tools. She was always looking to play at a highergame – and sought coaching – to push that edge and be supported in doing so. Meghanwanted to combine professional success with her personal life (recently married, eager to be amother) “in a healthy, balanced, way.”Her personal growth and development has been apparent in her personal successes as well asher professional achievements. Meghan knew that as she continued to develop, the challengesthat she continued to face enabled her to have even greater learning opportunities. Shebrought her real world challenges into her coaching and applied the outcomes immediately.two years after commencing coaching, Meghan “lived” the AIM Model of Leadership and shewas reaping the rewards. She was constantly “growing herself”, and deepening relationshipswith colleagues, friends, family and her partner. There was tremendous alignment and shewas experiencing the great results in virtually all areas of her life.Meghan returned from maternity leave and accepted a “growth position” as a manager of anearly stage investment fund with an entirely different team and new technical responsibilities. Inaddition she was given the challenge of co-running this team. That said, each of the newlearning areas was the “easy” aspect. The greatest challenge was collaborating with someonewho was focused on leading by the old Model of Success. Her partner Joe had a number ofbig, financial wins under his belt. He had closed huge deals for different financial institutionsand had the “confidence” to prove it. He had been rewarded for the what and it seemed hadpaid “less” attention to the who or how along the way.When Meghan was asked to co-manage a new fund with Joe, she was excited. Although theposition was outside her comfort zone, she knew Joe had great experience with his backgroundin technology, banking, running his own early stage venture, and an incredible track record oftaking over, financing, and successfully exiting this company. Meghan went into the situationuncertain of her abilities to deliver for the huge project and hopeful that she could learn fromJoe.Meghan felt stretched beyond her capacity to manage her multi-cultural team and to balanceher family role as a mother and wife. The fund Meghan and Joe were tasked to run wassponsored and wholly owned by a non-profit specializing in international development . Meghancame to AIM Leadership for guidance on how to effectively balance her personal andprofessional life, knowing that when her personal relationships were fulfilling so too would beher professional relationships and responsibilities.As an AIM leader and someone who followed through with her coaching, Meghan focused onbuilding relationships while Joe was very result-oriented. Meghan spent all this time developingreal relationships so she could connect to build deeper rapport with her clients. Joe continued 11
  12. 12. to focus on the deals and his track records. Soon associates and clients wanted to meet withMeghan instead of Joe, and with Meghan’s AIM leadership strategies she continued to close herdeals while Joe didn’t close any.While Joe focused more on the results (what), Meghan focused on the process (who & how).Team members were reluctant to work with Joe; he was perceived as callous, brusque anddisrespectful. As their track record “split,” Joe started to focus even more on closing the deals,achieving the what. Meghan, a people person by nature, focused on their team, therelationships and the engagement of colleagues to support the execution of details.During a 6 month period, Meghan closed more deals, had more invitations to collaborate, andwas asked to speak more often (3:1). This gave her more exposure to then attract more deals.Consistently Meghan reached out to Joe, trying to get to know him, to meet him on his turf tounderstand what was important to him. She tried to share strategies from her own success.This increased the pressure on Joe.Joe resisted the chances to look in the mirror and their partnership came to a head during ateam retreat that focused on aligning outcomes. Joe wanted “old model” style while Meghanand her team wanted the AIM Model style. Joe didn’t have the self-knowledge to managehimself. He wasn’t able to share of himself, failed to create the real relationships with othersand didn’t adapt to the institutional context within which he was working. This approach costhim deals, deteriorated relationships within his team and bled social capital with colleaguesaround him. His ego was attached to closing the deals (what), and he didn’t have the agility totry other approaches (how) and partnerships (who).Amid company restructuring when budgets were cut, Joe was one of the first to go. He didn’thave the results, the relationships, or the rapport to even have a discussion with executives.Although she had significantly less depth of knowledge within this industry, Meghan and herAIM model of leadership were a coveted resource. She was given a raise and kept abreast ofthe situation. Management also “listened” to her amid the shifts. To that end Meghan saw “allof Joe,” the human side and his unique skills, and strategically worked to retain him.If Meghan made one mistake in this partnership it was not placing high enough priority on thevalues /alignment of her partnership with Joe. More specifically, had she known he could onlydo the old model she might have established rules of engagement / conditions for collaborationsooner, saving herself emotional energy and social capital within the company that was spent“trying to save him.”     12
  13. 13. Conclusion  In the information age, people are a company’s greatest resource. By leveraging self-awareness, latent strengths, personal values, and individuality, AIM clients create aleadership style that is comfortable, sustainable and effective. With our changingeconomy and globalization, we are witnessing the need for authentic leadership that willsustain through technology and time. AIM Leadership is deeply passionate about anddedicated to creating customized solutions which further maximize your leaders’performance abilities.We see the immense value in results-oriented collaborations and realize that in order tocreate sustainable solutions, we must work together with people-oriented teammembers.The value is in the quality of the services. Among our adaptable and continuallyprogressive approaches are our executive coaching services, interactive trainings, andinternational speaking engagements. Focusing on the strategies and resources, AIMLeadership will enable you to empower and inspire yourself and your company. 13
  14. 14. Outcomes of AIM ClientsSelf-knowledge is core to leadership effectiveness. How well do your leadersknow themselves? How well are they managing themselves and others? AIM Clients… Optimize their strengthens and navigate their weaknesses Apply the 7 steps to leadership effectiveness Lead more effectively because they are congruent and aligned Leverage the 4 factors of emotional intelligenceHow effectively do you and your team connect and communicate? AIM Clients: Connect quickly and genuinely through real relationships Implement the 5 steps of rapport to achieve business success Leverage Authentic Encounters Know and practice the power of language Apply the 3 core values of communication to create results Respond more swiftly and successfully when facing a challengeHow engaged, effective and excited are you and your associates? AIM Clients: Engage their teams to achieve 3 steps for outstanding results Utilize SMART goals and lead by example Apply consequences and outcomes to ensure success Effectively manage themselves as well as their associates Recognize how to motivate and move beyond any challenge Master strategies for powerful questions to engage associatesAre your managers fostering engagement, effectiveness and profitability? AIM Clients: Master powerful questions to engage associates Listen on 3 levels to address challenges more comprehensively Communicate even more clearly and effectively Co-create optimal solutions to increase associate engagement and results Understand the 5 rules to gain and maintain influence Motivate associates to innovate beyond challengesAre your associates aware of their full potential? Are you? AIM Clients: Understand the 5 patterns of conflict, and know how to defeat them Manage and resolve conflicts more effectively by understanding the 5 patterns of conflict and the strategies required for each Learn specific tools to overcome stress Engage the 7 steps to become a powerful collaborator Develop versatility to achieve results and enhance relationships 14
  15. 15. Are your associates adapting and evolving in the global economy? Are you? AIM Clients: Leverage emotional intelligence Create real relationships for virtual leadership Practice virtual authenticity to create and maintain a sustainable global team Engage clients and colleagues strategically to enhance virtual communication Are disciplined and effective at engaging colleagues in virtual authenticity Maintain the 3 steps to achieve global communicationHow effective and sustainable are your results? AIM Clients: Enhance productivity through alignment Maximize employee engagement and retention through effective relationships Optimize assignments and leverage individual abilities Leverage individual wellness, effectiveness and productivity Engage the 3 core values of productivity and technology Navigate obstacles proactively before they become challenges     15
  16. 16. Highlights from our Ebook SeriesAIM Leaderships uses eBooks to quickly distribute effective strategies to improveleadership. Topics range from interpersonal issues, such as New Rules of Success, tointrapersonal issues, such as Rapport. The following is a current listing of availableeBooks.Authentic Encounters • Know why a majority of employees resign and how to reduce this turnover. • Know how to improve employee job satisfaction. • Know the ways to create an honest and open workplace. • Know where to place employees, so they can continue to thrive and ultimately enable your company to succeed at an even greater level.Gift Giving Yoga • Give outstanding gifts • Keep yourcheckbook balanced • Maintain lasting relationshipsLeading Virtual Effectiveness • Learn the four strategies for effective communicatino in a distributed workforce • Align your team even when working remotely • Achieve the opportunities and maintain your succesNew Rules of Success • Leverage yourself to be even more successful • Optimize your strategy for feeling even more A.L.I.V.E. • Learn the 4 key components of Success • Enhance your ability to communicate with your associates, managers, and team even more successfullyThe Science of Complexification • Recognize when others complexify • Understand the costs of complexifying • Empower yourself and others to work smarter not harder • Know the 6 steps to simplifying 16

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