Biorefining and biobased products

6,439
-1

Published on

The NNFCC provides high quality, industry-leading technical consultancy which will add value to your business. Working with us enables you to stay ahead in a complex and constantly changing marketplace.

Published in: Technology

Biorefining and biobased products

  1. 1. NNFCC Biorefining and Bio-based Products Dr Adrian Higson February 2011The UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  2. 2. NNFCC Today’s Presentation About the NNFCC Background Biorefineries Market Activity Market DevelopmentThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  3. 3. NNFCC The UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials An Independent ‘not for profit’ company MissionThe NNFCC is committed to the sustainable development of markets for biorenewable products. We promote the benefits of biorenewable energy, liquid fuels and materials for enhancement of the bioeconomy, environment and society. Company Activity Advisor to UK Government Commercial Consultancy Member Information ServiceThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  4. 4. NNFCC NNFCC Operating Space Engagement Technology Evaluation Industry Policy Supply Chain Translation Analysis Renewable Raw Materials Government Academia Sustainability Market Assessment EvaluationThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  5. 5. NNFCC The NNFCC shares the vision of a low carbon economy Improve efficiency GHG emissions Fossil fuel substitution Replacement of oil based materials End of waste Source: Adapted from ‘GHG Emission reductions with Industrial Biotechnology’: Assessing the Opportunities, WWF & NovozymesThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  6. 6. NNFCC EU Renewable Energy Directive European Governments focussed on Bioenergy Mandatory EU target of 20% renewable energy in overall energy consumption by 2020 UK Target – 15% Electricity Heat Transport 40 30 2020 20% 20 47% 2006 10 2008/9 33% 0 Electricity Heat TransportThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  7. 7. NNFCC Biorenewable Chemicals and Polymers Market size ~ 50 million tones Chemical Derivatives Naval Stores Natural Products Oleochemicals Biopolymers Amino Acids Alcohols Aliphatic acids Other Fermentation Products 54% 7% 4% 17% 1% 7% 5% 1% 20% 1%The UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  8. 8. NNFCC Images courtesy of DuPont, Novamont, Clarifoil, Arkema & NatureworksThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  9. 9. NNFCC Interest in bio-based chemicals - Why now? Policy Support Feedstock Technology Pressure Drive Market DemandThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  10. 10. NNFCC Relative feedstock pricing 300 250 200 150 Agricultural Raw Materials Food Crude Oil 100 50 0 Dec-00 Dec-01 Dec-02 Dec-03 Dec-04 Dec-05 Dec-06 Dec-07 Dec-08 Dec-09 Dec-10 Jun-01 Jun-02 Jun-03 Jun-04 Jun-05 Jun-06 Jun-07 Jun-08 Jun-09 Jun-10The UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  11. 11. NNFCC Sugar Price 1981-2011 35 30 25 30 year average 10US cents/pound US cents/pound 20 10 year average 12US cents/pound 15 10 5 0 May-… May-… May-… Jan-81 Mar-84 Oct-85 Jun-90 Jan-92 Mar-95 Oct-96 Jun-01 Jan-03 Mar-06 Oct-07 Aug-82 Aug-93 Aug-04 Nov-88 Nov-99 Maize Price 1981-2011 350 300 250 $/tonne 200 30 year average $120/tonne 150 10 year average $137/tonne 100 50 0 Jan-81 Mar-84 Jun-90 Jan-92 Mar-95 Jun-01 Jan-03 Mar-06 Oct-85 Oct-96 Oct-07 May-87 May-98 May-09 Aug-82 Nov-88 Aug-93 Nov-99 Aug-04The UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials http://www.indexmundi.com/commodities/
  12. 12. NNFCC Crude Oil Price 1981-2011 140 120 100 30 year average $31/bbl 80 10 year average $55/bbl $/bbl 60 40 20 0 Jan-05 Jan-81 Jan-85 Jan-89 Jan-93 Jan-97 Jan-01 Jan-09 May-82 May-86 May-90 May-94 May-98 May-02 May-06 May-10 Sep-83 Sep-87 Sep-91 Sep-95 Sep-99 Sep-03 Sep-07The UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  13. 13. NNFCCThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  14. 14. NNFCC Biorefineries hold the key to sustainable bio- based product economics Gudbrand Rødsrud, Director Business Development, Borregaard Innovasjon Norge workshop, Tromsø juni 2010: ”Profitability in biorefining is difficult to achieve without an integrated approach, where bulk products such as biofuel are produced side-by-side with high-end chemicals.”The UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  15. 15. NNFCC Organic residues Starch Sugar Lignocellulosic Lignocellulosic Oil based Grasses Oil crops Algae and others crops crops crops residues residues Grain Straw Straw Separation Fractionation and/ Pretreatment Pressing/ or pressing desruption Lignin Fiber Gasification separation Organic solution Pyrolysis, HTU Oil Hydrolysis Syngas Anaerobic Extraction Pyrolytic digestion C6 sugars C5 sugars liquid Water gas shift Separation Hydrogenation / Upgrading Biogas Methanisation Chemical Fermentation reaction Upgrading Chemical reaction Combustion Estherification Upgrading Steam reforming Water H2 electrolysis Chemical Legend reaction Feedstock Chemical Thermochemical process process Mechanical/ Biochemical Platform Physical process processes Organic acids Synthetic biofuels Chemicals & Animal Biomethane Biomaterials Food Material & extracts (FT, DME…) polymers feed Energy products products Electricity Link among biorefinery pathways Fertilizer Bio-H2 Bioethanol Glycerine Biodiesel and heatThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  16. 16. NNFCCCargill Biorefinery ErythritolBlair, Nabraska Lactic acid Ethanol Sugar Natureworks PLA Corn Food Lactic Acid Lactic acid Corn oil derivativesThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials Source: Google
  17. 17. NNFCCLes Sohette’s BiorefineryBazancourt–Pomacle,FranceThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials Source: Google
  18. 18. NNFCC Les Sohette’s Biorefinery DevelopmentThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  19. 19. NNFCCA Vision of biorefining - Potential for fractionation Cellulose The separation of 5 refinery streams Hemi- Extractives cellulose However unlike crude oil Ligno- these streams are to an cellulosic extent chemically & biomass physically linked Protein LigninThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  20. 20. NNFCC Biorefinery Focus Material focussed High value product Expensive processing Fractionation potential high Process costs Energy focussed Low value product Low cost processing Pre-treatment Minimal fractionationThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  21. 21. NNFCC Process development must be holistic Biomass • Hardwood Biomass • Softwood • Herbaceous Processing 1 • Acid • Alkali Processing 1 • Thermal • Solvent Processing 2 Processing 2 • Biological • Chemical • PhysicalThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  22. 22. NNFCC Biorefinery Evolution Biomass Biomass Process Fractionation Fractionation Products Products Cellulose Cellulose Hemicellulose Hemicellulose Lignin Lignin Markets Fuel Chemicals Fuel Chemicals Energy ChemicalsThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  23. 23. NNFCC Lignin Syngas Hydrocarbons Phenols Oxidised Macromolecules Products Products Methanol Benzene Phenol Vanilin Carbon Fibre DME Toluene Substituted Vanilic Acid Fillers Ethanol Xylene Phenols DMSO Polymer ExtendersMixed Alcohols Cyclohexane Catchols Aromatic Substituted LigninsFischer Tropsch Styrenes Cresols Acids Thermoset Resins Liquids Biphenyls Resorcinols Aliphatic Acids CompositesC1-C7 Gasses Eugenol Syringaldyde Adhesives Syringols Aldehydes Binders Coniferols Quinones Preservatives Guaiacols Cyclohexanol Pharmaceuticals Β-keto Adipate PolyolsThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  24. 24. NNFCCThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  25. 25. NNFCC DOE’s Top 12 Bio-derived building blocks (2004) O O O O HO O OH HO OH HO OH O Succinic acid 2,5-Furandicarboxylic acid 3-Hydroxypropionic acid NH 2 O O OH OH O O HO OH OH HO HO OH O OH OH O NH 2 Aspartic acid Glucaric acid Glutamic acid O O O O OH CH 3 HO HO CH 2 O HO O Itaconic acid Levulinic acid 3-Hydroxybutyrolactone OH OH OH OH OH HO OH OH HO OH HO OH OH OH Glycerol Xylitol SorbitolThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  26. 26. NNFCC Epichlorohydrin from glycerol Cl2 Cl + HCl • Solvay Epicerol® process Cl2, H2O • Demonstration - Tavaux, France Cl Cl OH OH HCl • Commercial + + HClHO OH OH • Plant location - Map Ta Phut catalyst Cl Cl • Capacity 100,000 tonnes • Glycerine demand – 120,000 NaOH tonnes • Start Up - Q1 2012 O + NaCl Cl The UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  27. 27. NNFCC Propylene glycol from glycerol • ADM – Propylene glycol OH H2, cat. OHHO OH HO • Plant location – Decatur US • Capacity 100,000 tons DOW Chemical Company - Status unknown Huntsman Corporation – Status unknown Cargil/Ashland – Capacity 65,000 tonnes, location EuropeThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  28. 28. NNFCC Lactic acid • Food and cosmetic ingredient • Polylactic acid – First large scale bio-based synthetic polymer • European demand predicted to rise from 25,000 per year to 650,000 tonnes by 2025 • Global lactic acid production capacity > 500,000 tonnes • End Products from compostable packaging to textile fibresThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  29. 29. NNFCC Polylactic Acid 2.5 KgCO2 eq/kg Ingeo • Improving performance, new 2 1.5 additive packages 1 0.5 0 Ingeo since Ingeo 2009: Ingeo target • Improving ecoprofile 2005 currently implemented technology 60 • Advances in production allowing MJ nonrenewable energy/kg 50 40 stereocontrol 30 Ingeo 20 10 0 • Increasing number of players Ingeo since Ingeo 2009: Ingeo target 2005 currently implemented technologyThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  30. 30. NNFCC Ethylene Value Chain 60% Ethanol Ethylene Polyethylenes 7% Styrene Polymers/Rubbers Monomer Ethylene 14% Polyester Oxide/Glycol 12% EDC PVC 7% Other Alpha Olefins PVAThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials Source: Nexant ChemSystems
  31. 31. NNFCC Bio-ethylene market activity• Braskem (Brazil) • ethylene plant commissioned Q4 2010 • Capacity 200,000 tonnes/year – Further plants under study• Dow/Crystalsev (Brazil) • Planned Polyolefin production • Capacity 350,000 tonnes/year• Solvay (Brazil) • Planned PVC and PVAThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  32. 32. NNFCC Value Chain ActivityTETRA PAK PLANS BIOPLASTIC TRIALS BRASKEM AND PROCTER & GAMBLE: WORLD PARTNERS FOR THE GREEN POLYETHYLENE SUPPLY THE COCA-COLA COMPANY INTRODUCES INNOVATIVE BOTTLE MADE FROM RENEWABLE, RECYCLABLE, PLANT-BASED PLASTIC THE CAR PRODUCER TOYOTA HAS ANNOUNCED ITS INTENTION TO USE BIO-BASED PET FOR VEHICLE LINER MATERIAL AND OTHER INTERIOR SURFACESThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  33. 33. NNFCC GHG savings per unit of land Land unit Output GHG savings Bioethanol from 1 ha 66801 MJ 2,472 kg CO2 eq. wheat 3181 litres LLDPE from 1 ha 1.4 tonnes 3,270 kg CO2 eq. wheat Using wheat grain for polyethylene delivers an additional 32% GHG saving over fuel ethanol Land unit Output GHG savings LLDPE from sugar 1 ha 2.7 tonnes 6,402 kg CO2 eq. beetThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  34. 34. NNFCC PET - the other half? • Butamax and Gevo have targeted isobutanol as fuel and chemical precursor • Avantium are working on new furan platforms • Anellotech developing fast pyrolysis process to produce BTX from biomass OH O OThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  35. 35. NNFCC Succinic acid Polybutylene Succinic Acid 1,4-Butanediol Terephthalate Tetrahydrofuran Copolyester Ethers Deicers/Coolent Polytetramethylene Ether Glycol Solvent Thermoplastic Plasticisers Polyurethanes g-Butyrolactone Spandex Fibres Fuel Additives Fine & Speciality Chemicals N-Methyl -2- N-Vinyl-2- Pyrrolidone 2-Pyrrolidone Pyrrolidone Fine & Speciality Fine & Speciality Polyvinyl Chemicals Chemicals PyrrolidoneThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  36. 36. NNFCC Commercialisation of Succinic acid Dec 09 May 08 Jul 09 BioAmberBioAmber Myriant sign supply June 10 JV pilot runs agreement Reverdia JV Mar 09 Sep 09 Jan 10 Jul 10 DSM & BASF & BioAmber BioAmber & Roquette CSM commission DuPont demo demo plant plant Several commercial plants under study License and supply agreements announced Other technology providers in the raceThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  37. 37. NNFCC Development highlights, 2008-2010 • Global bioethanol production expansion (>61 million tonnes) • Cellulosic ethanol production – into demonstration phase • PLA capacity doubled and 2nd generation PLA developed • Large scale biomethanol production realised • A range of bio-based polyamides launched • Biosuccinic acid production - into demonstration phase • Propylene glycol - commercialised • Polyhydroxyalkanoates - commercialised • Biopolyethylene – commercialisedThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  38. 38. NNFCC Bio-based chemicals – growth potential Acetic Acid Acrylic Acid Chemicals from Renewable Materials Adipic Acid 5,000,000 Butanol Cellulose 4,500,000 Epichlorohydrin 4,000,000 Ethylene Isoprene Plant Capacity (tonnes) 3,500,000 Lactic Acid 3,000,000 Polyhydroxyalkanoates 2,500,000 Propanediol (1,3) Production Capacity Propylene 2,000,000 Propylene Glycol 1,500,000 Starch (in bioplastic) 1,000,000 Succinic Acid 500,000 Excludes traditional chemicals - e.g. amino acids, oleochemicals, citric acid etc 2010 2015 2020 2025The UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials Source: NNFCC
  39. 39. NNFCC Promise of things to come Expansion Commercialisation Ethanol Polyethylene Polylactic acid Epichlorohydrin Starch Plastics Propylene glycol Cellulose Films PVC Polyamides Butanol Polyurethanes Isobutanol Furans Succinic acid Amino acids Isoprene 1,3-Propanediol 1,4-butanediol PHA Itaconic acid Butanol Polypropylene Ethylene glycol Adipic acid Ethyl acetate Acrylic acid Isosorbide Glucaric acidThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  40. 40. NNFCC European Lead Market Initiative • Standards, labels and certification • Legislation promoting market development • Product specific legislation • Access to biomass • Encourage Green Public Procurement • Financing and funding of researchThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  41. 41. NNFCC What is bio-based? 100% bio-based content 100% bio- 60% Zemea™ based content X% bio- renewable 1,3- based Cerenol® content propanediol Pearlthane® polytrimethylene End ECO 100% bio- diol 28% bio- Product bio-TPU based content based content Susterra™ Sorona®Corn 1,3- poly(trimethylene propanediol terephthalate) 30-37% renewable Sorona® EP by weight thermoplastic polymers Merquinsa ASTM Standard D 6852: Standard Guide for Determination of Biobased Content, Resources Consumption, and Environmental Profile of Materials and DuPont ProductsThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  42. 42. NNFCC Carbon recycling and policy development CO2 Base Functional Cultivation Combustion material material Food and Energy Cycle Material Cycles Raw EndEndlife/Raw material of of life Solid/Liquid/Gaseous material BiofuelCultivation Base Recycle Material The UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  43. 43. NNFCC Linking Bio-based Materials to Renewable Energy Production Tuesday 1st March – Geological Society, London Bringing together experts in the field of measuring bio-based content to explain the options for measuring and certifying renewable content in materials and its importance in renewable energy generation Presentations from regulators, certifiers and companies working in the area of wastes, plastics, fuels and energyThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  44. 44. NNFCC Summary Bio-based product opportunities are being driven by: Technology development Feedstock pricing Market pull Considerable industry activity, however some issues: Access to feedstock Access to finance Biorefinery development is key to the long term success of bio- based products THANK YOU FOR LISTENINGThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  45. 45. NNFCC www.nnfcc.co.ukWebsite: www.nnfcc.co.ukEmail: I.1234567891@nnfcc.co.uk The UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  46. 46. NNFCC Any Questions? Website: www.nnfcc.co.uk Email: a.higson@nnfcc.co.ukThe UK’s National Centre for Biorenewable Energy, Fuels and Materials
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×