Joshua Jackson<br />MSCI Action Research Project<br />Brescia University<br />June 30, 2011<br />The Effect of Working on ...
Problem Statement<br />Many students work during school year.<br />Determine the relationship between GPA of high school s...
Definitions of Terms<br />GPA: high school student’s cumulative grade point average during the time of the study.<br />Job...
Significance of Study<br />Many studies have been done, but none in this part of the country.<br />To find relationship be...
Research Questions<br />Does working while in high school effect students’ GPA?<br />Do socioeconomic factors have an effe...
Hypotheses<br />High school students who work during the school year will show no significant relationship in the GPA comp...
Methodology<br />A self-created survey was used to collect data that would be analyzed. <br />Survey was administered onli...
Unit Analysis<br />Pearson r correlation modelwas used to find a relationship between to sets of numbers made by the same ...
Population Under Investigation<br />Apollo High School is made up 1,314 students.  There are 364 freshmen, 335 sophomores,...
Sample Used<br />Convenience and Random sampling was used to choose participants for study.<br />130 students who were dee...
Data Analysis<br />Pearson r was used in the following ways:<br />All Participants<br />Working Group<br />Free and Reduce...
Chart of Analysis<br />12<br />
Limitations to the Study<br />Students were chosen because they were in particular classes (not completely random).<br />S...
Recommendations<br />Suggested Future studies include:<br />Include more participants<br />Longitudinal study of students ...
Conclusion<br />Study shows there is no significant relationship between high school students’ GPA and working.<br />Stude...
Questions<br />16<br />
References<br />Mertler, C. A., & Charles, C. M. (2008). Introduction to educational research (6th ed.).  Boston, MA:  All...
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Final effects presentation

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Final effects presentation

  1. 1. Joshua Jackson<br />MSCI Action Research Project<br />Brescia University<br />June 30, 2011<br />The Effect of Working on High School Students’ GPA<br />1<br />
  2. 2. Problem Statement<br />Many students work during school year.<br />Determine the relationship between GPA of high school students who work during the school year.<br />Find solutions to help them.<br />2<br />
  3. 3. Definitions of Terms<br />GPA: high school student’s cumulative grade point average during the time of the study.<br />Job: working a set number of hours per week, outside of school to receive a paycheck.<br />Working Group: participants who held a job during the study.<br />Eligible Student: Student who is at least 16 yrs. old.<br />3<br />
  4. 4. Significance of Study<br />Many studies have been done, but none in this part of the country.<br />To find relationship between GPA and the number of hours worked.<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Research Questions<br />Does working while in high school effect students’ GPA?<br />Do socioeconomic factors have an effect on working students’ GPA?<br />5<br />
  6. 6. Hypotheses<br />High school students who work during the school year will show no significant relationship in the GPA compared to those who do not work during the school year.<br />There will be no significant correlation between the amount of hours worked by high school students and their GPA.<br />6<br />
  7. 7. Methodology<br />A self-created survey was used to collect data that would be analyzed. <br />Survey was administered online using Survey Monkey.<br />Online Survey<br />7<br />
  8. 8. Unit Analysis<br />Pearson r correlation modelwas used to find a relationship between to sets of numbers made by the same group of participants<br /> (Mertler & Charles, 2008, p. 336).<br />8<br />
  9. 9. Population Under Investigation<br />Apollo High School is made up 1,314 students. There are 364 freshmen, 335 sophomores, 328 juniors, and 281 seniors. <br />The junior and senior classes were considered the “eligible students” as they are generally of the legal age to work in the state of Kentucky. <br />The student body is comprised of 1,167 (88.1%) White students and 147 (11.9%) non-white students. <br />The school is 48.55% male (638) and 51.45% female (676.) <br />Forty-eight percent of the student body participates in the “free and reduced” lunch program.<br />9<br />
  10. 10. Sample Used<br />Convenience and Random sampling was used to choose participants for study.<br />130 students who were deemed “eligible”.<br />21.35% of the junior and senior class.<br />10<br />
  11. 11. Data Analysis<br />Pearson r was used in the following ways:<br />All Participants<br />Working Group<br />Free and Reduced Lunch<br />Two Parents Working<br />11<br />
  12. 12. Chart of Analysis<br />12<br />
  13. 13. Limitations to the Study<br />Students were chosen because they were in particular classes (not completely random).<br />Students who said they worked may have just started working.<br />Students who said they did not work may have just quit.<br />13<br />
  14. 14. Recommendations<br />Suggested Future studies include:<br />Include more participants<br />Longitudinal study of students in area<br />Studying minority groups <br />Study of time management methods for students who choose to work<br />14<br />
  15. 15. Conclusion<br />Study shows there is no significant relationship between high school students’ GPA and working.<br />Students can continue work while in school without fear of lower grades.<br />Students who are thinking about getting a job can do so and be successful.<br />15<br />
  16. 16. Questions<br />16<br />
  17. 17. References<br />Mertler, C. A., & Charles, C. M. (2008). Introduction to educational research (6th ed.).  Boston, MA:  Allyn and Bacon.<br />17<br />

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