Study Eligibility Criteria Quiz
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Study Eligibility Criteria Quiz

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  • Study Eligibility Criteria Interactive Quiz This interactive quiz augments the module on study eligibility criteria. It was prepared by Melissa L. McPheeters, Ph.D., M.P.H., a member of the Vanderbilt University Evidence-based Practice Center. The module is currently not included in Version 1.0 of the Methods Guide for Comparative Effectiveness Reviews (available at: http://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/ ehc/products/60/294/2009_0805_principles1.pdf).
  • PICOTS Components When selecting study eligibility criteria, it is important to keep the PICOTS components in mind. What does PICOTS stand for? Incorrect. PICOTS includes the important global ideas applicable to all phases of the review. Correct. PICOTS is an acronym that stands for: population (condition, disease severity and stage, comorbidities, patient demographics); intervention (dosage, frequency, and method of administration); comparators (placebo, usual care, or active control); outcomes (health outcomes, morbidity, mortality, and quality of life); timing (duration of followup); and setting (primary, specialty, inpatient, and cointerventions). Incorrect. PICOTS includes the important global ideas applicable to all phases of the review. Incorrect. PICOTS includes the important global ideas applicable to all phases of the review.
  • Study Eligibility Criteria N > 30 could be an example of study selection criteria. Correct. Other examples could include adult, community-dwelling females; study of a screening tool for depression; United States only; hospital-based studies only; N > 200; or randomized controlled trials. Incorrect. Selection criteria are the rules that dictate whether a study will be included or excluded.
  • When To Determine Study Eligibility Criteria Study eligibility criteria should be determined after the abstract review process is underway. Incorrect. Determining study eligibility criteria after reviewing literature may introduce bias and skew the results. Correct. To reduce bias, study eligibility criteria should be determined before any literature investigation. When determining study eligibility criteria, it is important to review study goals, assess the analytic framework and key questions, and tie criteria to the PICOTS (population, intervention, comparator, outcome, timing, and setting) elements.
  • Well-Constructed Selection Criteria Using well-constructed study eligibility criteria can help avoid which of the following? Correct, but there is a better answer. Options B, C, and D can also be avoided by using well-constructed study eligibility criteria. Correct, but there is a better answer. Options A, C, and D can also be avoided by using well-constructed study eligibility criteria. Correct, but there is a better answer. Options A, B, and D can also be avoided by using well-constructed study eligibility criteria. Correct, but there is a better answer. Options A, B, and C can also be avoided by using well-constructed study eligibility criteria. Correct. Study eligibility criteria are powerful tools for broadening or narrowing the scope of a review. When properly constructed and applied, study eligibility will reduce bias and enhance the applicability of the review.
  • Summary
  • Author This interactive quiz augments the module on study eligibility criteria. It was prepared by Melissa L. McPheeters, Ph.D., M.P.H., a member of the Vanderbilt University Evidence-based Practice Center. The module is currently not included in Version 1.0 of the Methods Guide for Comparative Effectiveness Reviews (available at: http://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/ ehc/products/60/294/2009_0805_principles1.pdf).

Study Eligibility Criteria Quiz Study Eligibility Criteria Quiz Presentation Transcript

  • Study Eligibility Criteria Interactive Quiz Prepared for: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Training Modules for Systematic Reviews Methods Guide www.ahrq.gov
      • When selecting study eligibility study criteria, it is important to keep the PICOTS components in mind. What does PICOTS stand for?
      • Personal, Interest, Comparison, Observation, Time, and Situation
      • Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome, Timing, and Setting
      • Public, Individual, Community, Organization, Time, and Society
      • None of the above
    PICOTS Components
    • N > 30 could be an example of study eligibility criteria.
    • True
    • False
    Study Eligibility Criteria
    • Study eligibility criteria should be determined after the abstract review process is underway.
    • True
    • False
    When To Determine Study Eligibility Criteria
      • Using well-constructed study eligibility criteria can help avoid which of the following?
      • Too much literature to feasibly review or disparate literature that cannot be compared
      • Too little literature
      • Inability to answer the intended question
      • Bias introduced through inclusion of inappropriate study designs or populations
      • All of the above
    Well-Constructed Study Eligibility Criteria
    • To reduce bias in a comparative effectiveness review, choose the study eligibility criteria before performing the literature review.
      • Assess study goals.
      • Appraise analytic framework and key questions.
      • Tie the criteria to PICOTS (population, intervention, comparator, outcome, timing, and setting).
    • Study eligibility criteria can broaden or narrow the scope of the review.
    • When properly applied, study eligibility criteria will enhance applicability of the review.
    Summary
    • This quiz was prepared by Melissa L. McPheeters, Ph.D., M.P.H., a member of the Vanderbilt University Evidence-based Practice Center.
    • The information in this module is currently not included in Version 1.0 of the Methods Guide for Comparative Effectiveness Reviews (available at: http://www.effectivehealthcare. ahrq.gov/ehc/products/60/294/2009_0805_principles1.pdf ).
    Author