Presentation of Findings Quiz

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  • Presentation of Findings Interactive Quiz
  • Studies Supporting Conclusions At the end of a systematic review, a meta-analysis is always done to synthesize results. Incorrect. Various types of heterogeneity in study data may preclude a quantitative synthesis (e.g., meta-analysis). Even studies meeting the same inclusion criteria can vary due to clinical heterogeneity (variation in the study population, interventions, and outcomes), methodological heterogeneity (variation in study design) or statistical heterogeneity (variation in observed treatment effect for trials). Correct. Data from heterogeneous studies are often synthesized by using tables (nonquantitative synthesis) instead of, or in addition to, a meta-analysis to capture underlying similarities that support conclusions.
  • Evidence Table When creating an evidence table, the reviewer combines information across multiple studies. Incorrect. When creating an evidence table, information on one study is collated and reported individually, although it is usually grouped into an organized format based on PICOTS (population, intervention, comparator, outcome, timing, and setting) elements. When creating a summary table, however, the reviewer combines information across multiple studies into one table. Correct.  When creating an evidence table, information on one study is collated and reported individually, although it is usually grouped into an organized format based on PICOTS elements. When creating a summary table, however, the reviewer combines information across multiple studies into one table. Incorporating multiple studies into a single table allows for entire subsets of the literature to be summarized and compared (e.g., by key question or study design).
  • Summary Tables Summary tables include general information but no results about studies. Incorrect. Summary tables can include information about study characteristics, but they may also include results. Correct. Summary tables combine data from multiple studies to illustrate trends in the data. They may be focused on describing study characteristics, results, or both. They can be designed to include characteristics of all studies included in the review or for subsets of studies.
  • Evidence Map An evidence map provides a graphical representation of a meta-analysis. Incorrect. Evidence maps are succinct graphical presentations of available studies to address key questions along one or more variables of interest. Results pertaining to outcomes are typically not included. Evidence maps can guide readers in knowing what comparisons and outcomes are available in the report. Correct. Evidence maps are succinct graphical presentations of available studies to address key questions along one or more variables of interest. Results pertaining to outcomes are typically not included. Evidence maps can guide readers in knowing what comparisons and outcomes are available in the report.
  • Summary
  • Authors This interactive quiz augments the module on presentation of findings. This quiz was prepared by Melissa L. McPheeters, Ph.D., M.P.H., and Jeff Seroogy, B.S., members of the Vanderbilt University Evidence-based Practice Center, and Joseph Lau, M.D., and Thomas Trikalinos, M.D., Ph.D., members of the Tufts Medical Center Evidence-based Practice Center. The module is currently not included in Version 1.0 of the Methods Guide for Comparative Effectiveness Reviews (available at: http://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/ehc/products/60/294/2009_0805_principles1.pdf).
  • Presentation of Findings Quiz

    1. 1. Presentation of Findings Interactive Quiz Prepared for: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Training Modules for Systematic Reviews Methods Guide www.ahrq.gov
    2. 2. <ul><li>At the end of a systematic review, a meta-analysis is always done to synthesize results. </li></ul><ul><li>True </li></ul><ul><li>False </li></ul>Studies Supporting Conclusions
    3. 3. <ul><ul><li>When creating an evidence table, the reviewer combines information across multiple studies. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>True </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>False </li></ul></ul>Evidence Table
    4. 4. <ul><li>Summary tables include general information but no results about studies. </li></ul><ul><li>True </li></ul><ul><li>False </li></ul>Summary Table
    5. 5. <ul><li>An evidence map provides a graphical representation of a meta-analysis. </li></ul><ul><li>True </li></ul><ul><li>False </li></ul>Evidence Map
    6. 6. <ul><li>Data in systematic reviews are synthesized using tables (nonquantitative synthesis) instead of, or in addition to, a meta-analysis to capture underlying similarities that support conclusions. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An evidence table collates and reports information from a single study.  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A summary table combines information across multiple studies. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Proper table construction and thorough data abstraction are crucial if the results of a review are to be accurately conveyed. </li></ul><ul><li>Evidence maps provide a graphical representation of available studies and help readers compare report outcomes. </li></ul>Summary
    7. 7. <ul><li>This presentation was prepared by Melissa L. McPheeters, Ph.D., M.P.H., and Jeff Seroogy, B.S., members of the Vanderbilt University Evidence-based Practice Center, and Joseph Lau, M.D., and Thomas Trikalinos, M.D., Ph.D., members of the Tufts Medical Center Evidence-based Practice Center. </li></ul><ul><li>The information in this module is currently not included in Version 1.0 of the Methods Guide for Comparative Effectiveness Reviews (available at: http://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/ehc/ products/60/294/2009_0805_principles1.pdf ). </li></ul>Authors

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