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Ashton
Ashton
Ashton
Ashton
Ashton
Ashton
Ashton
Ashton
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  • 1. The impact of accessingEgyptian art and materialculture in prisonsSally-Ann Ashton,The Fitzwilliam MuseumGed Murray, 1990
  • 2. 1 High Security and Local NW2 Cat C training East3 Cat C training East4 Cat B training- private East Midlands5 High Security West Midlands6 High Security East7 Cat C training South Central8 Cat C training East9 Cat B Local- private East10 Female- private East11 Cat C training East12 Cat B training- private East Midlands13 Cat B training Kent and Sussex14 High security Yorkshire andHumberside15 High Security East16 Cat B training West Midlands17 YOI East18 YOI/HMP London19 Cat B Local- private West Midlands20 Remand- private London21 Cat B East Midlands
  • 3. Workshops/Lectures• Art• Literacy, numeracy• Social and life skills• Barbering• African andCaribbean culture• ‘Black’ identity• Black History• Black history inprisons• African-centredEgyptologyCurriculum basedlearning• Working with Blackprisoners• African and Caribbeancultural heritage• The impact of accessingcultural heritage in prisons• Cultural awarenessStaffArt exhibitionsWing-based exhibitionMagazineBooklets
  • 4. Aims and Objectives1. To encourage ownership of cultural heritage, in particular forBlack and Muslim prisoners, who have a direct link with Egyptthrough their African and Islamic roots.2. To create a point of contact with the outside world for longterm prisoners and to present a means of sharing culture andknowledge.3. To provide sustainable educational resources that willstimulate interest amongst people who have had a poorrelationship with learning and schooling.4. To evaluate the impact of teaching African cultural heritage ina prison environment.5. To disseminate the findings and resources to prisons,education departments and museums.
  • 5. September 2007-2009 12 prisons 1211 prisoners 167 staff 212 sessionsOctober 2009-December 2011 16 prisons 1498 prisoners 135 staff 95 sessions2012 13 prisons 504 prisoners 18 staff 37 sessions• Quantitative questionnaires• Qualitative studies• Diary• Letters• Comments after lectures• Focus groups• ‘Before and after’ studies• Longitudinal study
  • 6. Qualitative Research• A qualitative study of the impact of cultural heritage programmes onthe self-concept of Black male prisoners (Mphil)• A qualitative survey in a category C prison on attitudes to Black HistoryMonth in a prison setting• A longitudinal study following the release of long-term students withregard to their involvement with heritage and culture• Focus groups and data analysis for a survey on racism at a category Cprison• Qualitative interviews relating to African and Caribbean hair in prisons
  • 7. Impact: a two-way process
  • 8. • Training• Trust• Understanding the environment• Identifying key issues• Knowledge transfer

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