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Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.
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Working at the Speed of Night - Vicky Hoyt, Flatiron West, Inc.

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  • This is a community IssueThe Stakeholders come from a variety of perspectives.As I present the material keep on open mind there are competing issues at stake…as you will see.Flatirons passion for work zone safety really came about after a seris of incidents. We took a hard look at our training and realized…even though of our traffic control people were certified that we really didn’t have a focused “work zone awareness” training.We started a western region steering committee that went to work to gather evidence based best practices and eventually put together an A really good awareness training.
  • Define “work zone”From the 1st warning sign to the “end construction” signDifferent from a CONSTRUCTION JOB SITEWork zones are dangerous places, but the need for highway repair and additional road work continues to grow as highway congestion continues to get worse. Between 1985 and 2006, vehicle miles traveled increased by nearly 100 percent, while highway lane miles only increased 5 percent during the same period (U.S. Department of Transportation, 2008). Add to the need for more highway work, a mounting frustration among the nations' driving public, and the danger grows.
  • Open Discussion- Capture on paperFor later inclusion
  • The number of fatalities and injuries of the traveling public is worse than the occupational incidents, even among what OSHA calls “High Hazard” industries45% are during the night. Caltrans admits a preference to schedule work at night as a way of increasing the amount of work that can be performed in a shift. Traffic volumes are lower and more lanes can be closed, allowing greater production and less complaints from the public. Contractors are accustomed to meeting their customers’ demands and have adapted with little question to Caltrans requests. Nevertheless, the incidents of confused and intoxicated drivers go up at night, increasing the risks for both the public and the workers (Mc Gowen, 2006). In 2006, federal government officials from The Federal Highway Administration (FHA) surveyed the publicand found the top three complaints of the public involved how the contractor completed the work, citing needs for: (1) more durable paving materials, (2) repairs during non-rush hours, and (3) reducing repair time (U.S. Department of Transportation, 2001).The FHA has been actively involved in responding to public concerns by taking a functionalist approach. The agency has been developing ways to speed the completion of projects through design-build strategies, standardization of traffic control methods, material designs, and engineering innovations implemented early in the project development process (McClelland,2000). At the same time they have addressed safety concerns by increasing communications through awareness campaigns, public announcements, and driver education programs. They have opened education clearing houses that provide free educational materials to contractors regarding safety devices to keep the work zone safe for all (FARS, 2009 ).
  • An operational plan should be developed for night work, to address risks associated with worker exposure to traffic, work vehicles and equipment. Workers (especially those inexperienced in night work) should be trained in procedures to avoid hazards associated with lowered visibility.
  • Looking at Protective Options- Distribute handouts
  • Caltrans admits a preference to schedule work at night as a way of increasing the amount of work that can be performed in a shift. Traffic volumes are lower and more lanes can be closed, allowing greater production and less complaints from the public. Contractors are accustomed to meeting their customers’ demands and have adapted with little question to Caltrans requests. Nevertheless, the incidents of confused and intoxicated drivers go up at night, increasing the risks for both the public and the workers (Mc Gowen, 2006
  • EVEN INCREASED USE OF MESSAGE BOARDS DURING DAYTIME HOURS
  • Work zones are dangerous places, but the need for highway repair and additional road work continues to grow as highway congestion continues to get worse. Between 1985 and 2006, vehicle miles traveled increased by nearly 100 percent, while highway lane miles only increased 5 percent during the same period (U.S. Department of Transportation, 2008). Add to the need for more highway work, a mounting frustration among the nations' driving public, and the danger grows. In 2006, federal government officials from The Federal Highway Administration (FHA) surveyed the publicand found the top three complaints of the public involved how the contractor completed the work, citing needs for: (1) more durable paving materials, (2) repairs during non-rush hours, and (3) reducing repair time (U.S. Department of Transportation, 2001).The FHA has been actively involved in responding to public concerns by taking a functionalist approach. The agency has been developing ways to speed the completion of projects through design-build strategies, standardization of traffic control methods, material designs, and engineering innovations implemented early in the project development process (McClelland,2000). At the same time they have addressed safety concerns by increasing communications through awareness campaigns, public announcements, and driver education programs. They have opened education clearing houses that provide free educational materials to contractors regarding safety devices to keep the work zone safe for all (FARS, 2009 ).  Criteria #2: an analysis of the problem using one of the social change theories studied in the course.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Working at The Speed of NightWork Zone AwarenessPresented by: Vicky HoytDate: July 11,2012 1
    • 2. Working at The Speed of NightObjectives All Participants will be able to: 1)Define the Work Zone and its Hazards 2) List What is Currently Being Done to Improve Conditions 3)Name at Least 1 Community Action You and/ or Your Company Can Be Committed to Improve the Working Conditions 2
    • 3. Working at The Speed of NightWork Zone AwarenessA WORK ZONE is a traffic way area that includes Highway & street construction or utility work activities. It differs from the “construction jobsite” in that the work zone is in a roadway that has passing traffic. 3
    • 4. Working at The Speed of NightDangers in The Work ZoneOSHA has identified two major categories of hazards found at work zones: internal hazards and external hazards.What Are Some Common Internal Hazards? What Are The External Hazards of the Work Zone? 4
    • 5. Working at The Speed of NightDangers in The Work Zone at NightHigh Accident FrequencyStruck By AccidentsProductivity LossesConfusion in Work FlowPoor Efficiency Lighting Problems at Night :Not enough lightAngle of light plantSetting up light plantImpaired/reduced visibility 5
    • 6. Working at The Speed of NightDangers in The Work ZoneIn California, the traffic congestion and citizens demand freeway closure workto be performed primarily at night (McGowen, 2006).. 6
    • 7. Working at The Speed of NightContractors Best Practice Measures:Traffic Control Devices- Follow MUTCDGood, Glare-Free Illumination – Adequate & Not BlindingVisibility of Workers- BE SEENWork Vehicle Visibility- BE SEENTrain Supervisors & Crews in Work Zone AwarenessUse Barrier Methods 7
    • 8. Partial Freeway Closure with AttenuatorsProtecting the Work Zone PARTIAL CLOSURE SINGLE LANE OF TRAFFIC 8
    • 9. Working at The Speed of NightPartial Freeway Closure with Ideal Work Zone Protection PARTIAL CLOSURE SINGLE LANE OF TRAFFIC 9
    • 10. Working at The Speed of Night 10
    • 11. Working at The Speed of Night Improving Working Conditions and Incident Statistics 1 Work Zone Fatality Occurs every 7 hours The number of fatalities and injuries of the traveling public in work zones is worse than the occupational incidents, even among what OSHA calls “High Hazard” industries 4 out of 5 Fatalities are Public Drivers 11
    • 12. Working at The Speed of Night 12
    • 13. Working at The Speed of NightSolutions To Take Safety to the Next Level for All Stakeholders:CalTrans+ AGC+ CHP = Good Work Zone SolutionsImprove Specifications in the latest revisions(increase buffer zone, mandate barrier protection)Expand work WindowsCozeep Presence + Increase Ticket EnforcementPossible Speed Reduction in Night Work Zones 13
    • 14. Working at The Speed of NightGet The Workforce & Public Involved through specific awareness campaigns Los Angeles Times Carmagaddon 14
    • 15. Working at The Speed of NightMAKE CHANGES TO THE SPEED LAWS!Lowering the Speed Limit in Work Zones Throughout California between 11 PM & 3 AM It takes less than one minute longer to travel through a two-mile work zone at 45 miles per hour than at 65 miles per hour. 49 seconds to be exact! PETITION to Change the Law 15
    • 16. Working at The Speed of Night Review 1)Name OSHA’s Two Workzone Hazard Categories:_______________, __________________ 2) Name One Measure that Would Help Protected workers from External Hazards: ________________ 3)What Part of the Community Effort Can you make the most Impact? 1) Speak up at Cal Trans Meetings 2) Participate in Awareness Training 3) Participate via social network 4) Sign a Speed Reduction Petition 16
    • 17. Working at The Speed of NightWork Zone safety is a community problem that requires a culture change effort involving all the stakeholders 17
    • 18. Working at The Speed of NightOutreach DetailsState/Agency: California Campaign Name: "Slow for the Cone Zone" Description: The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) introduced its "Slow for the Cone Zone" safety campaign at a news conference in 2000. Hoping to reduce accidents in highway construction and maintenance zones, Caltrans targeted audiences in the San Francisco Bay Area and central coast of California with a clear message to slow down, stay alert and use great caution in the cone zone. The centerpiece of the campaign is a commercial, featuring a distracted driver slamming his automobile into a piece of highway construction equipment. Themes: "Slow for the Cone Zone" - Theme aimed at danger to driver of car in cone zones. Ease up and stay alert when passing a coned off area. Audio PSAs: Slow for the Cone Zone Radio Commercial consists of the message to be alert and slow for the cone zone. A car was crashed into a front-end loader for the commercial and to kick off the campaign. The crash sound is heard in the commercial. Video PSAs: The centerpiece of the campaign is a commercial, featuring a distracted driver slamming his automobile into a piece of highway construction equipment. As glass shatters and metal distorts, viewers are reminded of the dangers they face when they ignore the orange cones that outline a work zone. As if a further warning were needed, the narrator dramatically reminds motorists, "Slow for the Cone Zone". Materials: Slow for The Cone Zone Billboard consists of the message " Slow For The Cone Zone" and Caltrans logo seen with cones. Graphics include Orange cones and the phrase "Slow For The Cone Zone." Web site and signage on the back of trucks. Website: http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/conezone/ 18
    • 19. Working at The Speed of Night- References Axley, S. R. (2000). Communicating change: Questions to consider. Industrial Management, 42(4), 18–22. Department of Labor Statistics, (2009) Census of fatality statistics, summary. http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cfoi.nr0.htm Curwen, T. (2011) In the Carmageddon drama, L.A. drivers had to know their roles. July 16, 2011 edition, Los Angeles Times FARS, (2009)National Work Zone Safety Information Clearinghouse Work Zone Fatalities, http://www.workzonesafety.org/crash_data/, based on information from National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS). Flatiron (2011). Baldwin Park Project Incident Journals. Gonzales, J. (2010) Interview at California Hospital, Oct, 2010, Los Angeles Ca. Nastasi, B. & Schensul, S. (2005). Contributions of qualitative research to the validity of intervention research. [Electronic version]. Journal of School Psychology, 43, 177-195. Hammersley, M. & Atkinson, P. (1995). Ethnography: Principals and practice. NY, New York: Routledge. Marsella, A. J. (1998). Toward a “global community psychology”: Meeting the needs of a changing world. American Psychologist, 53(12), 1282-1291. Mathis, (2002). Street-smart behavior based safety: It’s time for the theory to get real. Industrial Health and Safety News. Retrieved on January 4, 2008 from web site: http://www.proactsafety.com/articles.htm McClelland, K. (2000). Functionalism. Retrieved from http://web.grinnell.edu/courses/soc/s00/soc111- 01/IntroTheories/Functionalism.html 19
    • 20. Working at The Speed of NightMiller, W. R., & Rollnick, S., (1991) Motivational interviewing: Preparing people to change behaviour. New York: Guilford Press.Melton, G.,(1992). The law is a good thing (Psychology is, too): Human rights in psychological jurisprudence. Law and Human Behavior, 16, 381-389.Mathis, (2002). Street-smart behavior based safety: It’s time for the theory to get real. Industrial Health and Safety News. Retrieved on January 4, 2008 from web site: http://www.proactsafety.com/articles.htmMcClelland, K. (2000). Functionalism. Retrieved from http://web.grinnell.edu/courses/soc/s00/soc111- 01/IntroTheories/Functionalism.htmlMiller, W. R., & Rollnick, S., (1991) Motivational interviewing: Preparing people to change behaviour. New York: Guilford Press.Melton, G.,(1992). The law is a good thing (Psychology is, too): Human rights in psychological jurisprudence. Law and Human Behavior, 16, 381-389.O’Neil, P., (2004). The ethics of problem definition. Canadian Psychology, 46(1), 13-20.Sahlins, M. (1976). Culture and practical reason, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.U.S. Department of Energy,(2002). Temporary losses of highway capacity and Impacts on Performance. Oak Ridge National Laboratory.U.S. Department of Transportation, (2001).Federal Highway Administration, Moving Ahead: The American Public Speaks on Roadways and Transportation Communities. FHWA-OP-01-017. Washington, D.C. 20
    • 21. Working at The Speed of Night- RefrencesU.S. Department of Transportation, (2002). Federal Highway Administration, A Snapshot of Peak Summer Work Zone Activity Reported on State Road Closure and Construction Websites. Washington, D.C.U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (2003-2008). Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, http://www.workzonesafety.org/files/documents/crash_data/worker_fatalities_2003-2007.pdfU.S. Department of Transportation, (2004). Federal Highway Administration, Characteristics of Todays Work Zones, presentation at TRB Annual Meeting by Gerald Ullman (Texas Transportation Institute) on preliminary study results. Washington, D.C.U.S. Department of Transportation, (2008). Federal Highway Administration, Our Nations Highways 2008, Publication No. FHWA-PL-08-021 Washington D.C. 21

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