The integration of counselling with health promotion Terry Evans Counsellor GMH/ACSA
Ottawa Charter (1986) <ul><li>“ health promotion is…the process of enabling people to increase control over, and to improv...
5 key areas of work <ul><li>building healthy public policy </li></ul><ul><li>reorienting health & other services </li></ul...
Service Delivery Frameworks <ul><li>Health Promotion </li></ul><ul><li>Education </li></ul><ul><li>Community Development <...
The limits of current approaches to health promotion <ul><li>“ the vast majority of health promotion and educational inter...
 
Presenting Issues <ul><li>anxiety </li></ul><ul><li>depression </li></ul><ul><li>suicide </li></ul><ul><li>family relation...
Research findings on UAI <ul><ul><li>acculturation into the gay community and the influence of community norms </li></ul><...
Research findings on UAI <ul><ul><li>the association between frequent HIV testing and risk taking (serosorting) </li></ul>...
Research findings on UAI <ul><ul><li>mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, internalised homophobia and low sel...
 
 
Overcoming Barriers <ul><li>reorienting services within a health promotion framework and discourse </li></ul><ul><li>inclu...
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The Integration Of Counselling With Health Promotion

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Terry Evans discusses the importance of psychological issues in relation to health promotion and HIV prevention. This presentation was given at the AFAO HIV Educators' Conference 2008.

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The Integration Of Counselling With Health Promotion

  1. 1. The integration of counselling with health promotion Terry Evans Counsellor GMH/ACSA
  2. 2. Ottawa Charter (1986) <ul><li>“ health promotion is…the process of enabling people to increase control over, and to improve, their health. To reach a state of complete physical, mental and social wellbeing, an individual or group must be able to identify and to realise aspirations, to satisfy needs, and to change or cope with the environment. Health is, therefore, seen as a resource for everyday life, not the objective of living. Health is a positive concept emphasising social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities. Therefore, health promotion is not just the responsibility of the health sector, but goes beyond healthy lifestyles to wellbeing.” </li></ul>
  3. 3. 5 key areas of work <ul><li>building healthy public policy </li></ul><ul><li>reorienting health & other services </li></ul><ul><li>developing personal skills </li></ul><ul><li>creating supportive environments </li></ul><ul><li>strengthening community action </li></ul>
  4. 4. Service Delivery Frameworks <ul><li>Health Promotion </li></ul><ul><li>Education </li></ul><ul><li>Community Development </li></ul><ul><li>Social Work </li></ul>
  5. 5. The limits of current approaches to health promotion <ul><li>“ the vast majority of health promotion and educational interventions tend to espouse information and education as the foundation of behaviour change. Such assumptions produce an image of the individual that is overly rational and fails to take sufficient account of the complex interrelations between psychology, health issues and the sociocultural and moral environment in which people live.” (Crossley, 2004, p. 226) </li></ul>
  6. 7. Presenting Issues <ul><li>anxiety </li></ul><ul><li>depression </li></ul><ul><li>suicide </li></ul><ul><li>family relationships </li></ul><ul><li>relationship problems </li></ul><ul><li>domestic violence </li></ul><ul><li>drug and alcohol problems </li></ul>
  7. 8. Research findings on UAI <ul><ul><li>acculturation into the gay community and the influence of community norms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the desire to escape cognitive awareness of safe sex norms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the non-rational and affective process in risk-taking and decision making </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>cognitive disengagement associated with substance use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>cognitive disengagement associated with highly erotic sexual contexts </li></ul></ul>
  8. 9. Research findings on UAI <ul><ul><li>the association between frequent HIV testing and risk taking (serosorting) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the association between improved treatments and increased risk for some men </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the subjective meanings of UAI </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>barebacking as a manifestation of cultural norms of resistance and transgression </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>condom and erectile difficulties </li></ul></ul>
  9. 10. Research findings on UAI <ul><ul><li>mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, internalised homophobia and low self-esteem </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>alcohol and club drug use (crystal meth in particular) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>sexual compulsivity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>romantic obsessions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>sexual fantasies and internet dating </li></ul></ul>
  10. 13. Overcoming Barriers <ul><li>reorienting services within a health promotion framework and discourse </li></ul><ul><li>including counsellors within health promotion teams </li></ul><ul><li>including counsellors within national conferences such as this one </li></ul><ul><li>establishing regular meetings between prevention education teams and counsellors that work with gay men </li></ul><ul><li>initiating action research to identify the knowledge that counsellors have about HIV prevention and related mental health issues </li></ul>

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