HIV Australia: creating communities of engagement

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Finn O'Keefe (AFAO) highlights the value of HIV Australia - AFAO's flagship publication - in highlighting key and emerging issues, providing a snapshot of current thinking, and as a tool for advocacy and education.

This presentation was given at AFAO's Positive Services Forum 2012.

Published in: Health & Medicine
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  • The process of creating a publication as a way of profile raising specif
  • Distributed free
  • Includes news from commentary Australia Asia and the pacific; regional features; HIV treatment briefs; book reviews; always encourages submissions from readers;
  • Thematic editions produced around key and emerging areas, with input from a national advisory committee and bi-annual readers surveys. Themes often try to address areas where AFAO its members see current gaps, or address areas where advocacy is needed. We try to bring attention to issues and through the thematic issues create people ‘within’ and outside of the networks that AFAO and its members work with A readers survey is also conducted every two years to make sure we are remaining relevant And to consult the readership
  • Which has the effect of expanding and strenthening our existing networks
  • Feedback shows that readers feel engaged as part of an hiv community and also as a way to brief new workers on issues
  • Many respondands talk about the value of the publication as a health promotion tool
  • Magazine is raises the profile of issues in regional areas and is availe in services drs waiting rooms etc
  • HIV and criminalisation and HIV and prisons   Contributions included: Justice Health NSW HIV AIDS Legal Centre Australian Institute of Criminology The Kirby Institute Women in Prison Advocacy Network (WIPAN) We profiles the Australian Prisons Project A key advocacy issue that spearheaded this edition was the issue of NSPs in Australian prisons; and advocacy around implementing Australia’s first a needle and syringe program (NSP) in the Alexander Maconochie Centre (AMC) in Canberra
  • Dealt with issues including Access to HIV medication within an on release from prison Disproportionate rates of incarceration of ingenious people Extremely high rights of Hepatitis C in people, disproportionately affecting women and A and TSI  
  • Similarly HIV and Cultural Diversity came about because of feedback from our members of the increasing diversity of clients accessing HIV services Articles dealt with issues such as cultural competency, perceptions of risk amounst CALD communities, social exclusion
  • Contributors included Multicaultual HIV hep C service Centre for Culture, Ethnicity & Health National Centre in HIV Social Research ACON (Asian Gay Men’s program)
  • The edition showcased resources. We found many online links werent cuurent
  • Living documets: resouces can be updated; online only content; individual articles indexed in Google
  • Our most recent edition Women and HIV came about because of a feeling that There wasn’t a lot of easily accessible information on the topic.
  • We worked with The Kirby Institute to create clear easily digestible snapshot of the data. Readers also requested this theme a lot. We focused on not only the personal story, but also Articles that highlighted specific issues for women living with HIV: such as HIV and ageing issues unique to women, and the challenged of remaining visual in a global advocacy environment That is very male- dominated..
  •   Contributors included ARCHES – HIV Futures Positive Women Victoria Jane Costello – chair of NAPWA Women;s network Karalyn Macdonald Sally Cameron
  • HIV Australia: creating communities of engagement

    1. 1. HIV Australiacreating communities of engagement
    2. 2. HIV Australia: AFAO’s flagshippublication
    3. 3. HIV AustraliaAFAO’s flagship publicationDistributed to:AFAO member organisations;people living with HIVorganisations that work with PLHIVHealth and community workers libraries and universities government agencies and many others…
    4. 4. Distribution and reach Over 3000 copies of the magazine are distributed on a quarterly basis to organisations and individual subscribers across Australia 250 international subscribers, primarily in the Asia-Pacific
    5. 5. Content development Thematic editions produced around key and emerging areas, with input from a national advisory committee and bi-annual readers surveys
    6. 6. Thematic editions: Highlight key and emerging issues relevant to PLHIV and associated organisations Provide a snapshot of current thinking about specific issues A tool for advocacy and education on soecific issue Contributions both from within and ‘outside’ those who we deal with in our day-to-day
    7. 7. Reader feedback Themes of interest/relevance were evenly split – articles dealing stigma and discrimination, mental health, criminal law and ageing were all equally popular. Just over 50% of the readership cited relevance to their work as the primary reason for subscribing. 40% of readers said they were HIV positive
    8. 8. Reader feedback “This magazine has become my strongest connection to the HIV world now. Thank you.” “When I was new to the sector it helped get my head around many issues around HIV; got the human side too”
    9. 9. Reader feedback “As an ex-education officer I use it as an educational tool. Most of my clients discuss personal issues with me. Many are men who have sex with men but dont identify as gay or bi. Most of these guys are totally ignorant of risks.”
    10. 10. Reader feedback “HIV is not seen as much of a priority in Tasmania (small population, low numbers) but weve had some spikes in last few years - good to see the magazine and be able to display it and suggest it as a resource to other services.”
    11. 11. HIV and the prison system
    12. 12. HIV and the prison system
    13. 13. HIV and CALD communities
    14. 14. HIV Australia online
    15. 15. Women and HIV
    16. 16. Women and HIV: the data
    17. 17. NEXT EDITION…E-HIV: HIV AND ICTFocusing on HIV prevention and education projects that use socialmedia and other forms of information and communicationstechnology (ICT) to disseminate information and foster two-waycommunication about HIV prevention, testing, treatment, andresearch.
    18. 18. NEXT EDITION…E-HIV: HIV AND ICTFocusing on HIV prevention and education projects that use socialmedia and other forms of information and communicationstechnology (ICT) to disseminate information and foster two-waycommunication about HIV prevention, testing, treatment, andresearch.

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