Overview of The National Preventative Health Strategy - Prof. Rob Moodie
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Overview of The National Preventative Health Strategy - Prof. Rob Moodie

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Presentation from the AFAO National Symposium on Prevention, held in Sydney, Thursday 27 May, 2010.

Presentation from the AFAO National Symposium on Prevention, held in Sydney, Thursday 27 May, 2010.

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  • Delivery of Strategy and Government Response On 30 June the Taskforce delivered a suite of documents to the Minister: - Overview - The Roadmap – a detailed Strategy outlining a strategic way forward for prevention in relation to obesity , tobacco and alcohol and of the infrastructure needed to support and sustain actions in the longer term. - Three technical documents containing the latest international and national evidence on obesity, tobacco and alcohol. Documents are available in hard copy on request to DoHA and on line at www.preventativehealth.org.au
  • The following two slides provide historical perspectives of prevention (tobacco control measures and road traffic accident strategies) that have been progressive, determined, comprehensive and sustained.
  • A new national capacity will be developed. A capacity to effectively monitor, evaluate and build evidence. The Government through COAG has already committed to a National Prevention Agency – this will facilitate a national prevention research infrastructure to answer research questions about what works best, provide resources and advice for national state and local policies, generate new partnerships for workplace, school ad community interventions, assist in development of a prevention workforce and coordinate a national approach to social marketing. If we implement the tobacco strategies , approximately one million fewer Australians will smoke and the premature deaths of almost 300,000 Australians now living will be prevented between now and 2020 from just the four main diseases caused by smoking. We will also see significant decreases in Indigenous smoking. Source: Hurley S, Spittal M. Scollo M, Durkin S, Wakefield M. 2009 Predicted impact of proposed tobacco control strategies. Cancer Council Victoria – paper commissioned by the Preventative Health Taskforce. If we reach the targets for alcohol the proportion of Australians who drink at short term risky levels will drop from 20% to 14% and the proportion of those drinking at long term risky levels will drop form 10% to 7%, resulting in prevention of premature deaths of more than 7,200 Australians and prevention of some 94,000 fewer person years of life lost. The impact will be seen in 330,000 fewer hospitalisations and 1.5million fewer bed days at a cost saving for the health sector of nearly $2 billion by 2020. Source: Chikritz T. 2009 The impact of the Preventative Health Taskforce target reductions for risky/jigh risk drinking on national morbidity and mortality (2007-2020). NDRI Curtin University – Paper commissioned by the NPHTF. If upward trends in overweight and obesity continue there will be approximately 1.75 million deaths at ages 20+ years and 10.3 million years of life lost at ages 20-74 caused by overweight and obesity in Australia 2011-2050. Each Australian aged 20 –74 who dies from obesity between 2011 and 2050 will lose on average 12 years of life before the age of 75. As a first measure, If we can just stabilise obesity at current levels we can prevent the premature deaths of ½ a million people between now and 2050. Source: Gray V, Holman C. 2009 Deaths and premature loss o flife caused by overweight and obesity in Australia 2011-2050. Benefits form different intervention scenarios. School of Population Health University of Western Australia. Report for the NPHTF .
  • Key Result Areas Improve the safety of people who drink and those around them Increase public awareness and reshape attitudes to promote a safer drinking culture in Australia – through social marketing and public education and by embedding themes and messages within a broad range of preventative health policies and programs Regulate alcohol promotion especially through regulation of promotions which have high exposure to young people; through stronger enforcement of player’s behaviour and alcohol consumption within sporting codes, labelling of products and counter advertising of healthy products. Reform alcohol taxation and pricing arrangements to discourage harmful drinking – including new modelling to advise a rationalised tax and excise regime that will discourage harmful consumption and promote safer use; establish a minimum floor price for alcohol products and direct a proportion of revenue from alcohol tax towards initiatives that prevent alcohol related societal harm. Improve the health of Indigenous Australians through improved access to health services, support for locally developed initiatives, improved data systems for collection and analysis of population statistics on alcohol and drug use among Indigenous people, trial of alcohol diversion programs, and increased availability of night patrols and sobering up shelters in appropriate locations. Strengthen, skill and support primary healthcare to help people make healthy choices by enhancement of alcohol related training for PHC providers and development of a comprehensive network of referral services and programs between PHC and other relevant services. Build healthy children and families with particular recognition of the need to protect the health and safety of child and adolescent brain development; support for parents in managing alcohol issues at all stages of their children’s development and improved data collection. Support through development of a strong evidence base including development of a system for nationally consistent collection and management of alcohol wholesale data; development of a core set of national indicators on alcohol consumption and social impacts, expansion of current data sets and better use of existing key datasets on the harm to drinkers and harm to others.
  • Key Result Areas Improve the safety of people who drink and those around them Increase public awareness and reshape attitudes to promote a safer drinking culture in Australia – through social marketing and public education and by embedding themes and messages within a broad range of preventative health policies and programs Regulate alcohol promotion especially through regulation of promotions which have high exposure to young people; through stronger enforcement of player’s behaviour and alcohol consumption within sporting codes, labelling of products and counter advertising of healthy products. Reform alcohol taxation and pricing arrangements to discourage harmful drinking – including new modelling to advise a rationalised tax and excise regime that will discourage harmful consumption and promote safer use; establish a minimum floor price for alcohol products and direct a proportion of revenue from alcohol tax towards initiatives that prevent alcohol related societal harm. Improve the health of Indigenous Australians through improved access to health services, support for locally developed initiatives, improved data systems for collection and analysis of population statistics on alcohol and drug use among Indigenous people, trial of alcohol diversion programs, and increased availability of night patrols and sobering up shelters in appropriate locations. Strengthen, skill and support primary healthcare to help people make healthy choices by enhancement of alcohol related training for PHC providers and development of a comprehensive network of referral services and programs between PHC and other relevant services. Build healthy children and families with particular recognition of the need to protect the health and safety of child and adolescent brain development; support for parents in managing alcohol issues at all stages of their children’s development and improved data collection. Support through development of a strong evidence base including development of a system for nationally consistent collection and management of alcohol wholesale data; development of a core set of national indicators on alcohol consumption and social impacts, expansion of current data sets and better use of existing key datasets on the harm to drinkers and harm to others.
  • Key Result Areas Improve the safety of people who drink and those around them Increase public awareness and reshape attitudes to promote a safer drinking culture in Australia – through social marketing and public education and by embedding themes and messages within a broad range of preventative health policies and programs Regulate alcohol promotion especially through regulation of promotions which have high exposure to young people; through stronger enforcement of player’s behaviour and alcohol consumption within sporting codes, labelling of products and counter advertising of healthy products. Reform alcohol taxation and pricing arrangements to discourage harmful drinking – including new modelling to advise a rationalised tax and excise regime that will discourage harmful consumption and promote safer use; establish a minimum floor price for alcohol products and direct a proportion of revenue from alcohol tax towards initiatives that prevent alcohol related societal harm. Improve the health of Indigenous Australians through improved access to health services, support for locally developed initiatives, improved data systems for collection and analysis of population statistics on alcohol and drug use among Indigenous people, trial of alcohol diversion programs, and increased availability of night patrols and sobering up shelters in appropriate locations. Strengthen, skill and support primary healthcare to help people make healthy choices by enhancement of alcohol related training for PHC providers and development of a comprehensive network of referral services and programs between PHC and other relevant services. Build healthy children and families with particular recognition of the need to protect the health and safety of child and adolescent brain development; support for parents in managing alcohol issues at all stages of their children’s development and improved data collection. Support through development of a strong evidence base including development of a system for nationally consistent collection and management of alcohol wholesale data; development of a core set of national indicators on alcohol consumption and social impacts, expansion of current data sets and better use of existing key datasets on the harm to drinkers and harm to others.
  • Key Result Areas Improve the safety of people who drink and those around them Increase public awareness and reshape attitudes to promote a safer drinking culture in Australia – through social marketing and public education and by embedding themes and messages within a broad range of preventative health policies and programs Regulate alcohol promotion especially through regulation of promotions which have high exposure to young people; through stronger enforcement of player’s behaviour and alcohol consumption within sporting codes, labelling of products and counter advertising of healthy products. Reform alcohol taxation and pricing arrangements to discourage harmful drinking – including new modelling to advise a rationalised tax and excise regime that will discourage harmful consumption and promote safer use; establish a minimum floor price for alcohol products and direct a proportion of revenue from alcohol tax towards initiatives that prevent alcohol related societal harm. Improve the health of Indigenous Australians through improved access to health services, support for locally developed initiatives, improved data systems for collection and analysis of population statistics on alcohol and drug use among Indigenous people, trial of alcohol diversion programs, and increased availability of night patrols and sobering up shelters in appropriate locations. Strengthen, skill and support primary healthcare to help people make healthy choices by enhancement of alcohol related training for PHC providers and development of a comprehensive network of referral services and programs between PHC and other relevant services. Build healthy children and families with particular recognition of the need to protect the health and safety of child and adolescent brain development; support for parents in managing alcohol issues at all stages of their children’s development and improved data collection. Support through development of a strong evidence base including development of a system for nationally consistent collection and management of alcohol wholesale data; development of a core set of national indicators on alcohol consumption and social impacts, expansion of current data sets and better use of existing key datasets on the harm to drinkers and harm to others.
  • Significantly increase the price of tobacco products . Increasing price is one of the most effective measures for government to take to reduce consumption and prevalence (World Bank. Curbing the Epidemic. Governments and the Economics of tobacco control. Washington. World Bank 1999) Increase the frequency, reach and intensity of social marketing campaigns . Well funded social marketing campaigns rank second only to price as a key to reducing smoking. End all forms of advertising and promotion of tobacco products. The US Cancer Institute concludes a causal relationship between the promotion of tobacco and increased tobacco use. (National Cancer Institute, Theoretical underpinnings of medico-research in tobacco control and tobacco promotion. In The role of the Media Smoking and and Tobacco Control monograph No 19. Dept of Human Services, 2008). Eliminate exposure to second hand smoke in public places . Significant health risks are posed by exposure to smoke from tobacco products smoked by other people. No level of exposure is free of risk. At particular risk: - the young,who lack control over their environment; and the socially disadvantaged, who are more likely to be exposed at home and elsewhere in their community. ( US Dept of Health and Human Services. The health consequences of involuntary exposure to tobacco smoke: report of the surgeon general . Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Office of Smoking and Health 2006). Further regulate manufacturing, packaging and supply of tobacco products including: - Uniform licensing and monitoring of retail outlets; - National best practice prevention of sales to minors program. - Consumer product information - Introduction of reduced fire-risk cigarettes - Packaging eg design, contents and emissions; - Consider legal action against tobacco companies to recover health related and other costs. (See slides 29-36 for more detail on actions)
  • Ensure all smokers in contact with health services are encouraged/supported to quit Work in partnership with Indigenous groups to reduce smoking and exposure to tobacco among Indigenous Australians Boost efforts to discourage smoking in other highly disadvantaged groups Educate parents to protect young people from second hand smoke Ensure the public, media, politicians and other opinion leaders remain aware of the need for sustained and vigorous action to discourage tobacco use Ensure implementation, keep momentum going and measure progress towards targets
  • Australia, a world leader in the battle against smoking, stays in pole position with the government there announcing plans, from July, 2012, to force cigarette manufacturers to remove all branding colours and logos from cigarette packs.
  • Key Result Areas Improve the safety of people who drink and those around them Increase public awareness and reshape attitudes to promote a safer drinking culture in Australia – through social marketing and public education and by embedding themes and messages within a broad range of preventative health policies and programs Regulate alcohol promotion especially through regulation of promotions which have high exposure to young people; through stronger enforcement of player’s behaviour and alcohol consumption within sporting codes, labelling of products and counter advertising of healthy products. Reform alcohol taxation and pricing arrangements to discourage harmful drinking – including new modelling to advise a rationalised tax and excise regime that will discourage harmful consumption and promote safer use; establish a minimum floor price for alcohol products and direct a proportion of revenue from alcohol tax towards initiatives that prevent alcohol related societal harm. Improve the health of Indigenous Australians through improved access to health services, support for locally developed initiatives, improved data systems for collection and analysis of population statistics on alcohol and drug use among Indigenous people, trial of alcohol diversion programs, and increased availability of night patrols and sobering up shelters in appropriate locations. Strengthen, skill and support primary healthcare to help people make healthy choices by enhancement of alcohol related training for PHC providers and development of a comprehensive network of referral services and programs between PHC and other relevant services. Build healthy children and families with particular recognition of the need to protect the health and safety of child and adolescent brain development; support for parents in managing alcohol issues at all stages of their children’s development and improved data collection. Support through development of a strong evidence base including development of a system for nationally consistent collection and management of alcohol wholesale data; development of a core set of national indicators on alcohol consumption and social impacts, expansion of current data sets and better use of existing key datasets on the harm to drinkers and harm to others.

Overview of The National Preventative Health Strategy - Prof. Rob Moodie Overview of The National Preventative Health Strategy - Prof. Rob Moodie Presentation Transcript

  • AFAO National Symposium on Prevention Rob Moodie Chair, National Preventative Health Taskforce May 27 1010 The National Preventative Health Strategy
  •  
  • The Strategy sets out a ‘roadmap for action’ in three phases that is Progressive Determined Comprehensive Sustained … .. over the next ten years and beyond
  •  
  •  
    • Each arrow represents an enormous amount of work
    • Research, gathering evidence, building the case
    • Understanding community opinion
    • Communicating – changing public opinion
    • Understanding political and major stakeholder opinion
    • Building alliances
    • Using international experience
    • Getting the numbers
    Turning the rhetoric of prevention into reality – the hard slog
  • What difference will the Strategy make?
    • 1 million fewer Australians will smoke
    • 330,000 fewer alcohol related hospitalisations - cost saving of nearly $2 billion by 2020 -
    • Just stabilising obesity at current levels can reduce an estimated 1.25 million deaths and save half a million lives between now and 2050
    • Contribute to closing the Gap
    • The Taskforce put forward 35 key action areas and 136 sub-recommendations.
    • Most are staged, and have been put forward for implementation over the coming decade.
    • Taking Preventative Action
    • The Government’s Response
    • The Commonwealth Government supports or has taken action in 28 key action areas, with 63 sub-recommendations addressed.
    • An additional five sub-recommendations are also being addressed, using approaches that are slightly different from the Taskforce’s proposals.
    • A further 49 are under consideration by the Commonwealth Government.
    • Taking Preventative Action
    • The Government’s Response
    • This is the first step in responding to the Taskforce’s final report, and further action will be taken in coming years.
    • 15 of the sub-recommendations are the responsibility of state and territory governments, and will be referred to them for action.
    • Four others are not consistent with Government policy
    • Australian National Preventive Health Agency (ANPHA)
    • The first national agency dedicated to preventative health.
    • Consistent with the intent of the Taskforce, the Agency will be supported by an independent and expert cross -sectoral advisory council
    • Coordination of national efforts on the lifestyle risks of chronic disease
    • The Agency will work across jurisdictions and portfolios
    • Australian National Preventive Health Agency (ANPHA)
    • The Agency will bring together the best expertise in the country
    • It will play a role in gathering, analysing and disseminating the available evidence and evidence-based programs.
    • Pending successful passage of the legislation through Parliament in the Winter 2010 sittings, the Agency will be operational in mid to late 2010.
    • Australian Health Survey ($54 million) will provide key information on the prevalence of chronic diseases and their lifestyle related risk factors
    • Capturing around 50,000 Australians aged two years and over with results available in late 2012
    • Repeated every 5-6 years
    • a new National Longitudinal Study on Male Health, for which $6.9 million over four years :
    Surveillance
    • Monitoring Progress
    • The Commonwealth, states and territories, will report annually on the prevalence of
      • key chronic conditions
      • their lifestyle risk factors
      • their effective treatment
    • They have agreed to report on progress in reducing the prevalence of unhealthy weight, smoking, physical inactivity and poor nutrition
    • Gives the Commonwealth (and the States!) an ability to continue to monitor progress and assess performance
    • Obesity
    • Schools
      • $325.5 million available to states and territories through the Healthy Children Initiative
      • development of Health and Physical Education (HPE) in phase 3 of the national curriculum development
    • Communities
      • COAG Healthy Communities Initiative
      • 12 pilot communities – in low SES communities
    • Workplaces
      • Healthy Workers Initiative of the National Partnership to implement healthy lifestyle programs in workplaces - $289.4 million
    • Obesity
    • Social Marketing
      • extend the reach of the Measure Up campaign, with $41 million allocated to national level activities and
      • additional $18 million provided to the states and territories for local level complementary activities.
    • Obesity
    • Phase out the marketing of EDNP food and beverage products on free-to air and Pay TV before 9pm within four years.
      • The Government notes this recommendation. Change is currently being achieved through a combination of Government regulation, industry self regulation and new television initiatives
      • Government will monitor their impact to ensure effectiveness in reducing children’s exposure to advertising
    • Obesity
    • Develop methods for using taxation, grants, pricing incentives and/or subsidies to
      • promote active living
      • produce healthier food and beverage products,
      • consume healthier food and beverage products;
      • decrease the production, promotion and consumption of unhealthy food and beverage products
      • Increased tobacco excise by 25% = pack of 30 cigarettes increases by $2.16 = the total price of an average pack of 30 cigarettes above $15.
    • Social marketing campaigns
        • General population
        • Also targeting higher risk – pregnant women, prisoners, mental illness
    TOBACCO
    • Plain Packaging – world first
        • Update graphic warnings
      • Indigenous Tobacco control
      • The Government is conscious of the need to combat illicit trade in tobacco products.
    TOBACCO
  • Australia, a world leader in the battle against smoking, stays in pole position with the government there announcing plans, from July, 2012, to force cigarette manufacturers to remove all branding colours and logos from cigarette packs ………. …… ..Australia’s new anti-tobacco initiative is an historic event, and other countries now need to follow suit. The Lancet May 8, 2010
  •  
    • Alcohol
    • Alcopops - since the closure of the tax loophole, in a typical week Australians are consuming approximately 3.45 million less standard drinks of all spirit-based products compared to before the tax increase.
    • States and territories to harmonise liquor control regulations
      • The Commonwealth Government will pursue these recommendations through COAG and Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy (MCDS).
    • Establish the public interest case to exempt liquor control legislation from the requirements of National Competition Policy
      • The Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy concluded that National Competition Policy should not constrain licensing policy.
    • Regulate Alcohol Promotion
      • The Government notes the recommendation. The Government’s approach is to pursue voluntary and collaborative approaches with the alcohol industry before considering more mandatory regulation.
    • Regulate Alcohol Promotion
    • Phase out alcohol promotions to young people aged up to 25 years, including sponsorship of sport and cultural events
      • The Government notes this recommendation, but.. will not consider regulatory action at this time.
      • Establishment of a $25 million sponsorship fund as an alternative to alcohol sponsorship for community sporting and cultural organisations.
    • Commission modeling for a rationalised tax and excise regime for alcohol.
        • The Government will not amend alcohol taxation further while Australia is in the middle of a wine glut
      • Implement a minimum (floor) price of alcohol
        • The Preventive Health Agency will develop this concept for further consideration by Government.
    • Primary Care
    • The Government will establish a network of new Medicare Locals across Australia.
    • One of the functions of Medicare Locals will be to deliver health promotion and preventative health programs targeted to risk factors in their local communities.
    • Supported in this role by the Australian National Preventive Health Agency, which will provide national standards and guidelines to support the roll-out of effective and appropriate programs.
    • Primary Care
    • $449.2 million for coordinated care for individuals with diabetes, improve management and make sure they stay healthy and out of hospital
    • $632 million in the health workforce – 1,375 more GPs or GPs in training by 2013, and 680 more specialist doctors within a decade
    • $390.3 million over four years to boost support for nurse positions in general practice – to undertake a broad range of prevention activities, such as health assessments, health promotion and advice, etc
  • The Government’s Response http://www.yourhealth.gov.au/internet/yourhealth/ publishing.nsf/Content/report-preventativehealthcare