Barriers & motivations to HIV testing

736 views
692 views

Published on

The Australian Gay Community Periodic Survey (1998-2010) tells us that 1 in 8 sexually active gay men have never tested. Michael Atkinson (WA AIDS Council) talks about a strategy to address barriers to testing and to promote testing culture - the MClinic. This presentation was given at the AFAO/NAPWA Gay Men's HIV Health Promotion Conference in May 2012.

Published in: Health & Medicine, Education
1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
736
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Barriers & motivations to HIV testing

  1. 1. Introduction  Name:        Michael Atkinson Organisation & Project:   WAAC – Coordinator M Clinic   Topic:     The Role of Peer Educators in addressing Barriers & Motivations to HIV  Testing  The goal of infectious diseases screening is to test the asymptomatic population, find cases before they become symptomatic or are passed on; treat them and in doing prevent spread amongst high risk groups.  A key objective of sexual health screening is for high risk populations to test appropriately according to their sexual health behaviour. A regular testing pattern needs to be established according to number of partners and types of behaviour including UAI and sharing injecting equipment.  Asymptomatic screening can reasonably seem paradoxical to those being tested. Without symptoms there is no strong call to action and potentially little or no perceived benefit. For example, at your average sexual health clinic with a HIV yield of 1% ‐ 99 out of 100 people leave the clinic with little more to show than relief or piece of mind.  Therefore, for screening to work we need to make it as easy as possible by removing physical, structural and psycho‐social barriers. We need to provide accessible services, ideally including a variety of options that work to engage different testers.  On the surface the testing process is not particularly complex (slide #1): • One makes an appointment • They make their way to the clinic   • Talk about their sexual behaviour • Provide specimens • Return for their results • Schedule next appointment • And on it goes…  However, if testing is truly this easy why does the Australian Gay Community Periodic Survey (1998 ‐ 2010) tell us that 1 in 8 sexually active gay men have never tested? Gay Men’s HIV Health Promotion Conference 2012 | 1  
  2. 2. ‐ These rates are much higher for Under 30 year olds.  The reality is people can encounter a range of complex personal, lifestyle, social and psychological factors that intervene in the testing process (slide #2): • Stigma and discrimination associated with HIV status and sexuality – ‐ I recall a client who took ten years to test after a night of passion. He said he wasn’t prepared to deal with a positive HIV result – his main concern being the shame associated with telling his family. The client spoke about the significant impact this decision had on his sex life and frame of mind over the 10 years. The client tested negative and left the clinic a very different person. • Anxiety – most clients experience some degree of anxiety at some point along the testing process – whether it’s fear of needles or swabs, having to do the pre‐test discussion, or getting the result. Some level of anxiety can actually work as a positive motivator to test ‐ however we have certainly witnessed our share of clients who put off testing due to anxiety. • Guilt & shame – guilt for having potentially infecting others, and we also still regularly talk with clients who express shame about having been a “bad” gay citizen for slipping up and enjoying UAI. • Relationship dynamics – notions of trust • Lifestyle barriers ‐ people are busier than ever • Physical barriers – distance from services • Culture and religion  The M clinic was set up specifically to address barriers to testing and to promote testing culture (slide #3). • Community setting • Gay Friendly ‐ Staffed by a mix of peer and clinical staff • Same day appointments • Convenient open times and location   • Free & quick service • Attractive branding • Neutral setting ‐ increase MSM comfort   • Good parking and public transport • Confidential  Establishing a community based screening facility is quite an involved undertaking. Luckily for me, WAAC has a long history of providing community based screening services which hugely assisted with the process of establishing the M Clinic: Gay Men’s HIV Health Promotion Conference 2012 | 2  
  3. 3. 1) We have ran an outreach clinic in the 2 sex on promises venues for the last 21 years; and 2) We have run an asymptomatic clinic from the WAAC office in West Perth for the last 5 years.  Essentially the M Clinic arose from these two projects where a lot of the leg work was already done. WAAC had formed excellent working relationships with laboratory service providers, the Department of Health, contact tracers, numerous physicians in the sexual health sector and most importantly the client group. They had already established the testing algorithm, the risk assessment tool and policy guidelines all of which Have been adapted to the M Clinic setting.  Today, the M Clinic is a screening clinic with all the usual bells & whistles much like tertiary and other clinics. The key point of difference at the M Clinic is the engagement of qualified peers (gay men) who are involved in all aspects of the clinics operation which works to ensure the service is acceptable to the target group (slide #4): • Clinic coordination • Service delivery – Reception: greet clients, triage, informal education – Pre‐test discussion: hand over to nurse/doctor – Post‐test discussion: education and referral, giving positive results – Specimen collection – Treatment • Administration and Data Collection • Clinical Governance including research    Peer educators are trained to conduct pre & post‐test discussions, which involve motivational interviewing techniques that are used to address the aforementioned motivational barriers that can interfere with establishing appropriate testing regimes, and to some extent impact risk behaviour.  Peer Educators make clients feel comfortable by providing no judgement and an intrinsic understanding which allows clients to talk openly about an age old sensitive subjects – including sex, mental health, substance use etc.  Since establishment in July 2010 the M Clinic has reported the highest number HIV notifications among MSM from a single clinic in WA. We have diagnosed 18 cases in a 17 month period. Since November 2011 the M Clinic has diagnosed 50% of WAs MSM HIV cases. We started 2012 with an alarming 9 diagnoses in 9 Gay Men’s HIV Health Promotion Conference 2012 | 3  
  4. 4. weeks – all of which were incident cases. WAAC has responded by teaming up with the Kirby Institute to explore whether this recent surge in HIV infections is due to changes in risk behaviour and/or testing behaviours – of interest we are keen to establish the role of the community or peer model in identifying this high case load.  As a part of the research, the Department of Health provided an analysis of all MSM HIV infections in WA between 1 July 2012 and March 31 2012. One conclusion relates to the reasons for testing:   Newly diagnosed MSMs were more likely to test at the M Clinic than any other setting  because of risky behaviour – suggesting that the men preferred to talk to a peer about their  behaviour.  It is also the goal of peer educators to create a positive spin to get people into an appropriate testing regime. Being members of the community helps peer educators to appeal to client’s sense of altruism and to contribute to community and public health outcomes.  Peers are also involved in developing appropriate social marketing concepts which aim to influence normative testing behaviour. Peers use their understanding of their community to develop messages that promote the benefits of testing with a view to changing their views of testing norms.  Anecdotal evidence and feedback some clients suggests they see it as a ‘badge of honour’ to test regularly and contribute to the community good.    In summary, the peer model is an empowering approach in and of itself, which translates to the community in a positive way.  A peer lead service speaks volumes to the clientele.  The M Clinic has attracted strong support from the community and is generating excellent yields. At the moment we are participating in several research projects (Namely the WA Sexual Health Services Survey being conducted by the Kirby Institute), that will potentially validate the effectiveness of the community/peer model. In the mean time I will be bold to say I believe the peer model works (biased much). However, I am not claiming we have found the panacea for testing and am quick to say that I also believe the model does not suit everyone.  It would be convenient for service providers if gay men were a homogenous group and we could develop a one‐size‐fits‐all service. I don’t believe this is possible. One thing WAAC has learnt over the years is there are Gay Men’s HIV Health Promotion Conference 2012 | 4  
  5. 5. a variety of testers requiring different approaches to get them across the line. Some will always prefer the traditional medical setting, others prefer to test in the privacy of their home, while others who are fortunate to have an understanding GP prefer to access a holistic medical service.  I believe the successful application of the peer model to sexual health screening presents a unique opportunity to re‐engage gay men in broader health promotion programs. Furthermore, I also think it can be explored as a platform for delivery for innovations such as combined prevention – particularly treatment as prevention and PrEP.  Thank you for listening Gay Men’s HIV Health Promotion Conference 2012 | 5  

×