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Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.
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Overview of Water cycles, wastewater treatment processes, wastewater plant energy use and energy efficiency opportunities.

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Presented by Adim Altalibi at the AEP Ohio Water/Waste Water Customer Seminar at Zane State in Zanesville, Ohio

Presented by Adim Altalibi at the AEP Ohio Water/Waste Water Customer Seminar at Zane State in Zanesville, Ohio

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  • 1. WATER – ENERGY NEXUS WASTEWATER – ENERGY STAGE Presented by Adim Altalibi CEM, CHMM June 27, 2013
  • 2. Water – Energy Nexus Table of Contents: • Water cycles, use and the energy • Wastewater treatment processes • Wastewater plant energy use • Energy efficiency opportunities • Case studies
  • 3. Water – Energy Nexus Urban Water Life-Cycle Providing water and wastewater (W&WW) services involves extracting, moving and treating water Energy plays role in the following stages: Drinking water processes Customer use Wastewater (WW) processes Regulatory Requirements: SDWA, CWA
  • 4. Water – Energy Nexus Key Stages of the Urban Water Lifecycle
  • 5. Water – Energy Nexus Life-Cycle Energy Utilization Water Treatment Plant – Ann Arbor : Total capacity = 50 MGD Average flow delivered = 14 MGD (6 years of data) Average electric energy consumed/MG treated = 2389 kWh/MG Wastewater Treatment plants – Detroit: Secondary treatment capacity = 960 MGD Primary Treatment capacity = 1700 MGD Average WW flow treated = 660 MGD (3 years of data) Average electric energy consumed/MG treated = 1100 kWh/MG (Largest WWTP in Michigan, and largest single site in the US)
  • 6. Water – Energy Nexus Wastewater Treatment: What is WW Why treating WW How is it generated How is it collected (Smaller sewers, gravity systems, pump and lift stations, combined sewers) Inflow and Infiltration (I&I)
  • 7. Water – Energy Nexus Processes of a Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP): 1. Preliminary Treatment 2. Primary Treatment 3. Secondary Treatment 4. Advanced Treatment 5. Tertiary Treatment
  • 8. Water – Energy Nexus Typical Wastewater Treatment Process
  • 9. Water – Energy Nexus
  • 10. Water – Energy Nexus Lowering Energy Consumption and Cost • Improving energy efficiency • Implementing renewable energy • Planning O&M Energy Use: 1. Collection systems 2. Within WWTP – point of interest 3. Outside WWTP Energy/ Fuel types
  • 11. Water – Energy Nexus Operations/Processes major energy consumers 1. Preliminary and Primary Treatment • Electric drives • Various types of pumps • Pre-aeration equipment (circumstantial) 2. Secondary Treatment • Electric drives • Mixers/Mechanical aerators • Various types of pumps • Blowers
  • 12. Water – Energy Nexus 3. Tertiary Treatment • Electric drives • Mixers/Mechanical aerators • Various types of pumps • Blowers / Compressed air 4. Advanced Treatment & Disinfection • Blowers, compressed air, air strippers
  • 13. Water – Energy Nexus Disinfection Chlorine (transporting/storing liability), Ultraviolet, Ozone • UV Lamps • Ozone generators • Electric motors/dosing pump Sludge Processing
  • 14. Water – Energy Nexus Energy Distribution within a WWTP
  • 15. Water – Energy Nexus
  • 16. Water – Energy Nexus How to Optimize Energy 1. Installment of energy efficient measures 2. Adoption of improved processes Local Government Requirement Identify an energy baseline Implementation plan Local government finance Project(s) realization Continuous improvement through energy use monitoring
  • 17. Water – Energy Nexus Energy Efficient Measures • Variable frequency drives (VFD): pumping, aeration • Automatic continuous DO control • Fine bubble diffusers for aeration systems • Retrofit hydraulic-driven systems with electrical drives • High efficiency pumps and blowers • Premium motors (above market quality) • Low-pressure UV disinfection system • Retrofit pneumatic pumps with electrical pumps • Air compressors with VFDs • Gravity belt thickening of sludge • Rotary and screw- type sludge dewatering • High efficiency lighting, HVAC
  • 18. Water – Energy Nexus Improved Processes • Anaerobic digestion in place of aerobic digestion • Biogas utilization • Biomass utilization • Supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) • Renewable Solar and wind energy • Flow equalization demand and energy cost control • Waste-to-energy • Combined heat and power (CHP)
  • 19. Water – Energy Nexus
  • 20. Water – Energy Nexus FINE BUBBLE AERATION • One of the efficient aeration technology used • Increase oxygen transfer and treat- ment efficiency than coarse bubble • OTE 5 to 12 (lb O2/hp-hr)-Fine, • OTE 2.0 to 3.0 (lb O2/hp-hr) -Coarse • Reduces the energy usage/ costs • Approximately 30% energy savings from coarse bubble
  • 21. Water – Energy Nexus DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONTROL OF AERATION • Maintain a DO concentration that matches the demand of of the biological activity • Blowers or mechanical aerators operates on part-load • Energy savings achieved 20% to 40%
  • 22. Water – Energy Nexus VFD on Air Compressors • VFDs save energy by varying motor speed • 20 to 30% energy savings at part-load • Tighter pressure control • Longer motor life due to built-in soft start mechanism
  • 23. Water – Energy Nexus TURBO-BLOWERS • Turbo blowers use advanced bearing design (magnetic or airfoil) to allow for very high impeller speeds (40,000 RPM) • Units include integrated VFD, DO sensor, and controls • Enclosed, modular design
  • 24. Water – Energy Nexus TURBO BLOWER ADVANTAGES • 10-20% more efficient than conventional blower equipment • Good turndown (to 50% capacity) with little efficiency drop-off • Small footprint, lightweight • Quiet, low vibration • Very low maintenance requirements
  • 25. Water – Energy Nexus LOW-PRESSURE UV SYSTEMS • Low-pressure, low-intensity lamps are most efficient • Low-pressure UV lamps are recommended for small systems • No chemical disinfection • Requires very little contact time (seconds versus minutes for chemical disinfection) • Use over 50% less energy than medium pressure lamps
  • 26. Water – Energy Nexus VARIABLE FREQUENCY DRIVES ON PUMPS AND BLOWERS • Used in pumping and aeration • VFDs save energy by reducing the speed of the pumps with the waste water demand • VFDs reduce the speed (air flow) of the blowers to reduce the power draw of the blower motor • Saves 70 % energy as compared to constant speed at 50% flow • Soft start capability reduces wear and tear on motors
  • 27. Case Study Aeration System Improvements – DO Controlled Blowers and Fine Bubble Diffusers Waco Metropolitan Area Regional Sewer System - Waco, Texas Facility Size: 37.8 mgd design, 22.8 mgd average daily flow
  • 28. Description of Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) • The City of Waco, TX Utility Services Department implemented improvements to the aeration system at their WMARSS WWF to address deficiencies in the plant’s nitrification process. • Design air flow rate, producing coarse bubbles instead of fine bubbles, and the number of diffusers was inadequate. • The aeration system improvements consisted of the following:  Supplementing the existing fine bubble membrane and ceramic disc diffusers with additional diffusers. Number of diffusers in each basin was increased from 2,800 to 3,500.  Installing dissolved oxygen (DO) probes in each of the aeration basins’ three aeration zones (mid‐way in the first and second aeration zones and at the end of the third aeration zone).  Implementing automatic blower and aeration system control through the plant’s PLC system using aeration basin DO readings. The plant’s control system software provided the following
  • 29. Electricity Use & Estimated Savings
  • 30. Case Study San Jose/Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant, San Jose, CA Facility Size: 167 mgd design, 107 mgd average daily flow
  • 31. Description of ECM Project Drivers & Issues This case study describes several energy conservation measures (ECM) projects completed in 2008 which were partially funded by the California Wastewater Process Optimization Program (CalPOP). The ECM projects implemented at the SJ/SC Plant consisted of the following: • Pumping Systems Optimization The first ECM project focused on reducing energy consumption by optimizing the operation of three of the Plant’s major pump stations. • BNR Process Improvements Pulse Aeration of Anaerobic/Anoxic Zones & Mixed Liquor Channels A second ECM project implemented at the Plant involved switching the mode of air mixing in the anoxic/anaerobic compartments of BNR plants from continuous to pulse (On/Off). • Dissolved Air Floatation (DAF) Process Optimization Optimization of the DAF process was achieved by reducing the energy used by the pressurization pumps. This was made possible by utilizing proprietary algorithms developed by Ekster and Associates that provided the means to optimize the DAF control systems.
  • 32. Estimated Savings Energy Use Before and After Pump Station Optimization Energy Saved by Switching to Pulsed Aeration Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) Process Optimization
  • 33. Case Study Advanced Aeration Control: Oxnard Wastewater Treatment Plant Facility Size: 31.7 mgd design, 22.4 mgd average
  • 34. Case Study Advanced Aeration Control: Oxnard Wastewater Treatment Plant Facility Size: 31.7 mgd design, 22.4 mgd average The optimization/automation of the activated sludge system project includes: • Installing two on‐line TSS meters algorithms implemented as part of the subject ECM. • Replacing outdated dissolved oxygen meters with optical sensor technology • Installing software providing real‐time control of solids retention time (SRT) • Replacing the Turblex blower pressure based control software with DOmasterTM(Ekster and Associates Inc). DOmasterTM uses biological process model based algorithms instead of traditional PID algorithms for DO control • Using OPTImasterTM (Ekster and Associates Inc) software to optimize set points for SRT and DO for each aeration compartment diffuser grid.
  • 35. Description of Energy Conservation Measures (ECM) Project Benefits are: • Energy: Average energy usage by blowers was reduced from 175 kW in 2002 to 140 kW in 2009. This resulted in a 306,600 kWh per year reduction or a 20% energy savings. • Chemicals: Based on WWTP records: by reducing polymer dosage used for sludge thickening (benefit of improved sludge settleability), chemical costs were reduced by approximately $7,500 a year. • Labor: Improved process monitoring and automation reduced the number of operator hours by at least one hour per day • The total energy savings for this ECM are $26,980 per year. Including chemical cost savings and reduced manpower requirements, the total savings resulting from this ECM are $52,730 per year. • Payback: is 5 years, if others savings included, will be 2.5 years
  • 36. Case Study A new Aeration Control System at the Bird Island WWTP in Buffalo N.Y. Slashes Energy Costs • This project saves the city more than $350, 000/year in energy cost • Aeration Control System for the plant’s 32 aeration basins, replacing an older system • Improvement of aeration stability, handling fluctuation in loads, and ability to use DO set points well below the norm, for additional savings • M&V by NYSERDA – Review showed $357K annual savings. • Incentives offered by NYSERDA and National Grid • Project payback = 14 Months
  • 37. Water – Energy Nexus References 1. CDP Water Disclosure 2010, Global Report 2. GAO, Energy Needed to Supply, Use and Treat Water 3. MWEA, WW Management Handbook 4. U of M, Energy Utilization: W&WWTFs report to MI H2O objective conference 5. WERF 6. Evaluation of Energy Conservation Measures, EPA 7. Water Utility Infrastructure (UIM)

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