Bloom’sTaxonomy    Group 1
All activities mentioned areKindergarten library lessonsdeveloped to extend theclassroom curriculum based onthe state stan...
Remembering “Retrieving, recognizing, and recalling  relevant knowledge from long-term  memory” (Forehand, 2005)
Activity to Enforce RememberingSkills The librarian reads aloud Gingerbread Baby by Jan Brett.  As the librarian reads al...
Assessment The librarian would asses the  students by asking each student to  retell a portion of the story. If  students...
Understanding “Constructing meaning from oral,  written, and graphic messages  through interpreting, exemplifying,  class...
Activity to Enforce UnderstandingSkills The librarian will read aloud Goldisocks and  the Three Libearians. Throughout th...
Assessment This level of thinking can be  demonstrated when a student retells  and explains the actions of an event  or c...
Applying  “Carrying out or using a procedure   through executing, or implementing”   (Forehand, 2005)
Applying Activity As the library media specialist reads the story aloud,  students will share their perceptions of the ch...
Assessment   This level is demonstrated when the    students are able to successfully    portray a character, as well as ...
Analyzing  “Breaking material into constituent   parts, determining how the parts   relate to one another and to an overa...
Analyzing Activity A librarian reads Goldilocks and the Three  Bears to kindergarten students. As she  reads, she points ...
Assessment The assessment for this level of  knowledge occurs when the librarian  recognizes whether or not the  students...
Evaluating  “Making judgments based on criteria   and standards through checking and   critiquing” (Forehand, 2005)
Evaluating Activity The librarian chooses to read two different  versions of The Gingerbread Man. The librarian  assesses...
Assessment This level is of thinking is  successfully demonstrated when  students are able to create, write, and  draw a ...
Creating  “Putting elements together to form a   coherent or functional whole;   reorganizing elements into a new   patte...
Creating Activity The librarian will read Goldilocks and the  Three Bears. Throughout the reading, she  will stop to ask ...
Assessment The students have successfully  demonstrated this level of thinking if  they are able to write and sing a song...
Bloom’s Taxonomy      Quiz
1. When the librarian taught this lesson to the first   kindergarten class, it went very well. However, she   believes the...
2. After reading/listening to the story Goldilocks  and the Three Bears, students construct a  representation of a specifi...
1. If students are asked to express a story in a   different form, which level of Bloom’s   Taxonomy are they be asked to ...
4. Which activity is designed to reach the “Evaluation” level of   Blooms Taxonomy?  A. Middle school students, enrolled i...
5. Which verb listed best describes the   Analyzing level of Bloom’s Taxonomy?A. DescribeB. SummarizeC. ConstructD. Differ...
6. A kindergarten teacher asks her students to  draw a story sequence to recall the main  events. This question exhibits w...
Answers1.   B2.   D3.   A4.   E5.   D6.   F
ReferencesBrugger-Murphy, K. & Miner, B. (2009). Gingerbread Baby. Seasonal  Storytime Grades PreK-K (38). Greensboro, NC:...
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5340 group assignment 1

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5340 group assignment 1

  1. 1. Bloom’sTaxonomy Group 1
  2. 2. All activities mentioned areKindergarten library lessonsdeveloped to extend theclassroom curriculum based onthe state standards (TEKS).
  3. 3. Remembering “Retrieving, recognizing, and recalling relevant knowledge from long-term memory” (Forehand, 2005)
  4. 4. Activity to Enforce RememberingSkills The librarian reads aloud Gingerbread Baby by Jan Brett. As the librarian reads aloud to the students, he/she should scaffold the children’s understanding and model comprehension strategies for making inferences, explanations, vocabulary, and story elements. The librarian stops several times throughout the read-aloud to provide students the opportunity to participate and apply their skills. Once the story is over, students participate in remembering the places Gingerbread Baby visits as he avoids being captured. For this activity, the librarian draws an oven on one end of a length of bulletin board paper and a gingerbread house on the opposite end. To begin, attach a gingerbread baby cutout to the oven with sticky-tac. Then revisit the story and invite students to recall, in order, the places Gingerbread Baby visits after leaving the house. As a child names each location, sketch it on the paper. Then encourage students to retell the story by moving Gingerbread Baby along the path until he is safely in his home. (Brugger- Murphy & Miner, 2009, 38).
  5. 5. Assessment The librarian would asses the students by asking each student to retell a portion of the story. If students are able to successfully do this, they are able to think on the Remembering level.
  6. 6. Understanding “Constructing meaning from oral, written, and graphic messages through interpreting, exemplifying, classifying, summarizing, inferring, comparing, and explaining” (Forehand, 2005)
  7. 7. Activity to Enforce UnderstandingSkills The librarian will read aloud Goldisocks and the Three Libearians. Throughout the book, she will stop to allow students to discuss the events and the actions of the characters. When the story is done, students will receive materials to draw color and cut out a puppet of Goldisocks. Then, together with an assigned buddy, the students will take turns using the Goldisocks puppet to retell the part of the story when she uses the five finger rule to pick out a just right book.
  8. 8. Assessment This level of thinking can be demonstrated when a student retells and explains the actions of an event or character from a story. In this lesson, students demonstrate their understanding by using a puppet to retell an event.
  9. 9. Applying  “Carrying out or using a procedure through executing, or implementing” (Forehand, 2005)
  10. 10. Applying Activity As the library media specialist reads the story aloud, students will share their perceptions of the characters as the story progresses. The library media specialist will ask guiding questions pertaining to the personality and traits of the characters. Afterwards, students will voluntarily share their thoughts and ideas concerning the characters. Students may choose to share which character they feel they relate the most to (as time permits). Then, students will be arranged into groups where they will play “character charades”. Each group will have a bag with the name of each character from the story. As students take turns, they will randomly draw a name from the bag and attempt to portray that character as the other students within that particular group guess which character the student is constructing a representation of. Students may be challenged to attempt to construct a representation of the character without using any verbal signals. In the end, the library media specialist may allow students to demonstrate their representation of the various characters for the whole group.
  11. 11. Assessment  This level is demonstrated when the students are able to successfully portray a character, as well as being able to successfully identifying the representation.
  12. 12. Analyzing  “Breaking material into constituent parts, determining how the parts relate to one another and to an overall structure or purpose through differentiating, organizing, and attributing” (Forehand, 2005)
  13. 13. Analyzing Activity A librarian reads Goldilocks and the Three Bears to kindergarten students. As she reads, she points out key places where Goldilocks must react to the action of the story. Then the students must write a diary in which they explain how they would react to the action, not Goldilocks.
  14. 14. Assessment The assessment for this level of knowledge occurs when the librarian recognizes whether or not the students can differentiate between Goldilocks reactions and what the students’ reactions would be.
  15. 15. Evaluating  “Making judgments based on criteria and standards through checking and critiquing” (Forehand, 2005)
  16. 16. Evaluating Activity The librarian chooses to read two different versions of The Gingerbread Man. The librarian assesses for background knowledge prior to reading the two books. As the librarian reads, she stops several times through each story, allowing for predictions. Next the students are asked to explain the similarities and differences between the two versions of text. The librarian will then ask students to choose their favorite ending to the story. Finally, students will create a picture illustrating a unique ending. Students will use invented spelling to write/illustrate about their chosen ending. Students will use a visual rubric to critique their writing.
  17. 17. Assessment This level is of thinking is successfully demonstrated when students are able to create, write, and draw a unique ending.
  18. 18. Creating  “Putting elements together to form a coherent or functional whole; reorganizing elements into a new pattern or structure through generating, planning, or producing” (Forehand, 2005)
  19. 19. Creating Activity The librarian will read Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Throughout the reading, she will stop to ask answers of the students to ensure comprehension. She will ask the students how the characters would physically react to the action in the book, not just the words the story already uses. Then the students will be split into groups and asked to compose a song to tell the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears.
  20. 20. Assessment The students have successfully demonstrated this level of thinking if they are able to write and sing a song of Goldilocks and the Three Bears.
  21. 21. Bloom’s Taxonomy Quiz
  22. 22. 1. When the librarian taught this lesson to the first kindergarten class, it went very well. However, she believes the next kindergarten class will have a more difficult time working with a partner to retell that part of the story. She would like to give them a different activity. How can she change this activity but continue to ensure that the students are still only thinking at the Understand level of Blooms?a) Students can draw a picture of each of the characters from the story and label the drawings with each character’s name.b) Students can make a cartoon strip to show how Goldisocks used the five finger rule to help her pick out a just right book.c) Students can pretend that Goldisocks is having a birthday party at the Three Libearian’s house. Students will describe a gift that would be just right for Goldisocks.d) Students can take a survey of their friends to see how many of them use the five finger rule to help them pick out a book from the library. Students will analyze the results to see if the five finger rule is a useful tool.
  23. 23. 2. After reading/listening to the story Goldilocks and the Three Bears, students construct a representation of a specific character from the story Goldilocks and the Three Bears based on their perception of the story, students are demonstrating which level of Bloom’s Taxonomy?A. CreatingB. EvaluatingC. AnalyzingD. ApplyingE. UnderstandingF. Remembering
  24. 24. 1. If students are asked to express a story in a different form, which level of Bloom’s Taxonomy are they be asked to reach?A. CreatingB. EvaluatingC. AnalyzingD. ApplyingE. UnderstandingF. Remembering
  25. 25. 4. Which activity is designed to reach the “Evaluation” level of Blooms Taxonomy? A. Middle school students, enrolled in a theatre class, are asked to interview ten middle school students regarding their favorite play. B. Fifth grade students are asked to sort and classify rocks composed of different minerals. C. A kindergarten teacher asks students to predict what will come next in a story about The Three Little Bears. D. Third grade students are asked to match synonym word cards with matching antonym word cards. E. Seventh grade Language Arts students are asked to critique, judge and evaluate poetry. Students will write a 400 word essay stating their assessments. F. After studying famous inventors. Third grade students are asked to create a useable invention out of recycled products. Students will produce plans and propose their idea to the teacher for approval.
  26. 26. 5. Which verb listed best describes the Analyzing level of Bloom’s Taxonomy?A. DescribeB. SummarizeC. ConstructD. DifferentiateE. AssessF. Compose
  27. 27. 6. A kindergarten teacher asks her students to draw a story sequence to recall the main events. This question exhibits which level of Bloom’s Taxonomy? A. Creating B. Evaluating C. Analyzing D. Applying E. Understanding F. Remembering
  28. 28. Answers1. B2. D3. A4. E5. D6. F
  29. 29. ReferencesBrugger-Murphy, K. & Miner, B. (2009). Gingerbread Baby. Seasonal Storytime Grades PreK-K (38). Greensboro, NC: The Mailbox Books.Forehand, M. (2005). Blooms taxonomy: Original and revised.. In M. Orey (Ed.), Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and technology. Retrieved June 8, 2012 from http://projects.coe.uga.edu/epltt/Hopkins, Jackie M. (2007). Goldisocks and the three libearians. Madison, WI: Upstart Books.Overbaugh, R.C. & Schultz, L. (2012). Blooms digital taxonomy. Retrieved June 25, 2012 from http://edorigami.wikispaces.com/Blooms+Digital+TaxonomyTarlinton, D. (2003). Blooms Revised Taxonomy [Power Point Slides]. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/castanlucy/blooms- taxonomy-457128?ref=Technology (n.d). Bloom’s Taxonomy Verbs. Retrieved June 9, 2012 from http://www.teach-nology.com/worksheets/time_savers/bloom/

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