Automation Maintenance: Keeping Production Lines Humming While Preserving Assets
 

Automation Maintenance: Keeping Production Lines Humming While Preserving Assets

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Automation Maintenance: Keeping Production Lines Humming While Preserving Assets ...

Automation Maintenance: Keeping Production Lines Humming While Preserving Assets
Manufacturers are focusing on optimizing and streamlining processes in
order to reduce the overall cost of production. At the same time, preservation
of existing production equipment is essential. In an economic climate
where capital equipment expenditures have been substantially curtailed,
good maintenance practices are more important than
ever. Companies across different industrial verticals
have unique processes and subsequently unique issues
with maintenance of factory systems. However,
a set of common issues has emerged that are familiar
to maintenance operations whether the product is
automobiles, planes, consumer products, or food &
beverage.

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    Automation Maintenance: Keeping Production Lines Humming While Preserving Assets Automation Maintenance: Keeping Production Lines Humming While Preserving Assets Document Transcript

    • THOUGHT LEADERS FOR MANUFACTURING & SUPPLY CHAIN ARC INSIGHTS By Dick Slansky INSIGHT# 2003-41M OCTOBER 7, 2003 Today, manufacturers are becoming very aware of the long-term benefits of plant floor maintenance support practices that preserve capital assets while keeping the production lines running smoothly and efficiently. Automation Maintenance: Keeping Production Lines Humming While Preserving Assets Keywords Preservation of Assets, Unscheduled Downtime, Best Practices, OEE Summary Manufacturers are focusing on optimizing and streamlining processes in order to reduce the overall cost of production. At the same time, preserva- tion of existing production equipment is essential. In an economic climate where capital equipment expenditures have been substantially curtailed, good maintenance practices are more important than ever. Companies across different industrial verticals have unique processes and subsequently unique is- sues with maintenance of factory systems. However, a set of common issues has emerged that are familiar to maintenance operations whether the product is automobiles, planes, consumer products, or food & beverage. Analysis Maintenance and support practices are an integral component of optimized production processes and lean manufacturing. The primary focus has been to keep the assembly lines and processes running rather than the preserva- tion of assets. To achieve these goals, maintenance methods and practices have been developed specifically for each vertical industry. Today, manu- facturers are becoming very aware of the long-term benefits of plant floor maintenance support practices that preserve capital assets while keeping the production lines running uninterrupted. In order to keep the production lines running as efficiently and effectively as possible operations managers want to minimize unscheduled downtime. This translates into establishing levels of control over randomly occuring un-scheduled events such as equipment downtime.
    • ARC Insights, Page 2 ©2004 • ARC • 3 Allied Drive • Dedham, MA 02026 USA • 781-471-1000 • ARCweb.com Common Issues in Support of Plant Equipment Many companies report common issues encountered in providing an ade- quate level of support and maintenance from occasions of unscheduled downtime. Inadequate staffing due to budget cuts, lack of trained staff due to the introduction of new technologies, outdated equipment and outdated technologies emerged as the primary impediments to maintenance support activities. Companies often identify the lack of trained personnel for the latest tech- nologies as one their major problems. Factory automation systems hardware and software is increasing in technical complexity much faster than companies can train support personnel. This problem is compounded by the latest downsizing trends to reduce operating expenses creating the classic support dilemma of internal support versus external resource out- sourcing. Asset Management Enables Good Maintenance Practices Determining if an organization has an Asset Management plan in place is one criterion examined within the context of determining a Best Practice for maintenance. Asset Management of an enterprise’s equipment and facili- ties is becoming essential as an optimal Asset Management plan minimizes the cost of support and maintenance while extending the life of capital equipment. Moreover, effective use of the production equipment can sig- nificantly increase product yield and quality. Depending on the scope of a Adequate resources (Support Staff) Lack of trained personnel due to new technologies Outdated equipment Lack of supplier support Lack of supplier furnished information Outdated technologies Other 47.8 % 41.8 % 25.4 % 23.9 % 22.4 % 19.4 % 6.0 % Note: Percentages based on multiple choices Adequate resources (Support Staff) Lack of trained personnel due to new technologies Outdated equipment Lack of supplier support Lack of supplier furnished information Outdated technologies Other 47.8 % 41.8 % 25.4 % 23.9 % 22.4 % 19.4 % 6.0 % Adequate resources (Support Staff) Lack of trained personnel due to new technologies Outdated equipment Lack of supplier support Lack of supplier furnished information Outdated technologies Other 47.8 % 41.8 %41.8 % 25.4 %25.4 % 23.9 %23.9 % 22.4 %22.4 % 19.4 %19.4 % 6.0 %6.0 % Note: Percentages based on multiple choices Problems Encountered By Maintenance Operations
    • ARC Insights, Page 3 ©2004 • ARC • 3 Allied Drive • Dedham, MA 02026 USA • 781-471-1000 • ARCweb.com given Asset Management plan, it would either contain elements of maintenance methods and procedures or be structured to interface with a corporate level maintenance plan. Today, Asset Management has evolved into En- terprise Asset Management (EAM), which integrates maintenance, procurement, inventory, finance, and a host of other critical operations to deliver real-time visibility into enterprise effec- tiveness, capital optimization, and cost control. The purpose of EAM is to preserve operational assets while identifying and tracking revenue- generating assets throughout the lifecycle of the production equipment. Asset data including loca- tion, work history, and cost history are tracked over time, helping companies maximize produc- tivity and extend asset life. A typical EAM application models relation- ships between pieces of equipment, physical locations and the systems with which they are associated. This enables Operations to compile maintenance costs across systems, subsystems and locations. Operator Involvement Enhances Maintenance Performance One of the most effective methods of gaining control of unscheduled down- time is to promote the involvement of the operators in continuous maintenance activities. Operator ownership of the equipment directly leads to asset preservation. Production workers must be encouraged to “own” the process and the equipment that they use on the factory floor. By offering incentives directly tied to the productivity gains made through more efficiently maintained production assets, the production worker be- comes a stakeholder in the operation. In this way they are empowered to constantly monitor the process and look for ways to improve on the upkeep and maintenance of the equipment that they use. Although the owners of the production unit don’t perform any actual maintenance, they ensure that their unit equipment receives support and maintenance in a timely manner, and are aware of the improvements that need to be made. Benchmarking of maintenance processes and procedures Best Practices used to support factory auto- mation equipment Skill levels required for current and future automation technology Training of maintenance support staff Retention of skilled support staff Problems companies encounter in maintenance support Maintenance outsourcing used for support activities Metrics employed to measure support effectiveness Maintenance Issues and Challenges Facing Manufacturers
    • ARC Insights, Page 4 ©2004 • ARC • 3 Allied Drive • Dedham, MA 02026 USA • 781-471-1000 • ARCweb.com Best Maintenance Practices Use Performance Metrics Many companies lack adequate performance measures on related systems support costs such as equipment reliability, lifecycle costs and workforce efficiency to help determine what to support internally and what to out- source. This is leading companies to cut back on internal training programs and to experiment with outsourcing support in the more complex areas such as network infrastructure and enterprise application systems. How- ever, companies that capture adequate performance measures are able to selectively outsource support. An approach to tracking and measuring equipment performance is to iden- tify Key Performance Indicators (KPI). Downtime, Lost Time, and Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) are all widely used KPIs. The utilization of KPIs in a manufacturing operation has demonstrated that the working rela- tionship between operations and maintenance is strengthened. In effect, the use of KPIs provides a focus for both organizations to make continuous improvements through shared maintenance responsibilities. Recommendations • Manufacturers should develop and implement an overall corporate level maintenance plan that draws on both internal and external best practices for maintenance, as well as common automation architectures. • Establish methods for using metrics to measure maintenance perform- ance and effectiveness. This will be necessary in order to determine Return on Assets (ROA) and preserve investment in existing assets. Please help us improve our deliverables to you – take our survey linked to this transmittal e-mail or at www.arcweb.com/myarc in the Client Area. For further information, contact your account manager or the author at dslansky@arcweb.com. Recommended circulation: All MAS clients. ARC In- sights are published and copyrighted by ARC Advisory Group. The information is proprietary to ARC and no part of it may be reproduced without prior permission from ARC.