Ductless Hoods
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Ductless Hoods Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Ductless Hoods Erik Talley / Matthew Brinton Environmental Health and Safety Emerging Trends in Laboratory Ventilation ACS Fall 2009 National Meeting Washington DC August 15- 20, 2009
  • 2. What is a “Ductless Hood”? Enclosure + Fan + Filter = Ductless Hood Environmental Health and Safety www.med.cornell.edu/ehs ehs@med.cornell.edu 212-746-6201
  • 3. No!!!! Environmental Health and Safety www.med.cornell.edu/ehs ehs@med.cornell.edu 212-746-6201
  • 4. Design Limitations   Recirculation of exhaust air is potentially dangerous. –  Limited Filter Capacity (saturation, breakthrough, stripping)   Filter Changes (handling of used filters, including hazardous waste disposal as a hidden cost)   Poor design   Chemical hoods are used for more than just chemical containment (e.g. fire, explosions)   Not typically maintained by Facilities   User Knowledge/Misuse Environmental Health and Safety www.med.cornell.edu/ehs ehs@med.cornell.edu 212-746-6201
  • 5. Why consider ductless? (building limitations) Baker Pavilion Existing External Ducts Centre Georges Pompidou Environmental Health and Safety www.med.cornell.edu/ehs ehs@med.cornell.edu 212-746-6201
  • 6. Why consider ductless? (continued)   Increased safety for benchtop work or equipment.   Standard chemical hood design interferes with needs (e.g. dust weighing)   Insufficient need to justify infrastructure/operational costs of ducted hood (installation cost, space needs) . Environmental Health and Safety www.med.cornell.edu/ehs ehs@med.cornell.edu 212-746-6201
  • 7. Why consider ductless? (continued)   Energy efficiency (A single ducted chemical hood running 24/7/365 uses as much energy as a single-family home.)   Pollution capture Environmental Health and Safety www.med.cornell.edu/ehs ehs@med.cornell.edu 212-746-6201
  • 8. Hazard Assessment   An Industrial Hygienist must conduct a comprehensive Hazard Assessment including: –Type of Hazards –Frequency of Use: Dose –Duration of Use: Dose –Hazard Generation Characteristics –Effluent Characteristics Environmental Health and Safety www.med.cornell.edu/ehs ehs@med.cornell.edu 212-746-6201
  • 9. Limited Filter Applications   HEPA –  Powder weighing, nanoparticulates, etc.   Adsorbent Cartridges –  Nuisance odors –  Low toxicity chemicals –  Applications where chemical usage is: •  limited (volume and time) •  consistent •  controllable   Dual Filters –  Animal Surgeries Environmental Health and Safety www.med.cornell.edu/ehs ehs@med.cornell.edu 212-746-6201
  • 10. Controls   Service Contract   Connect to house exhaust if possible (canopy, thimble)   Minihelic Pressure Gauge (HEPA), Flow Monitor, Vapor Sensor   Signage   Training   Inspections Environmental Health and Safety www.med.cornell.edu/ehs ehs@med.cornell.edu 212-746-6201
  • 11. Case Study - Gross Anatomy   Plastination –  New Process –  Limited Use –  Single chemical hazard (organotin compound) –  Very Limited Space   Hood Selection –  Activated carbon   Controls –  Air exhausted to outside after being filtered –  Limited Access –  Training –  Inspection Environmental Health and Safety www.med.cornell.edu/ehs ehs@med.cornell.edu 212-746-6201
  • 12. Case Study - Clinic   Urology –  Endoscope disinfection machine –  Located in interior of building with no exhaust options –  Gluteraldehyde (5%) Solution   Hood Selection –  Carbon filter hood designed specifically for the endoscope machine   Controls –  Service Contract –  Labeling –  Training Environmental Health and Safety www.med.cornell.edu/ehs ehs@med.cornell.edu 212-746-6201
  • 13. Case Study – Laboratory   Epigenomics Core Laboratory –  Chemical use limited to sample preparation •  ~125 ml total chemical usage/month –  Hood use approximately 30-60 minutes a week   Hood Selection –  Dual Filter   Controls –  Limited Access –  Labeling –  Service Contract –  Training Environmental Health and Safety www.med.cornell.edu/ehs ehs@med.cornell.edu 212-746-6201
  • 14. Resources Environmental Health and Safety www.med.cornell.edu/ehs ehs@med.cornell.edu 212-746-6201