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Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)
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Education in transition lcff lcap (parent workshop ppt) 11-5-13 (all notes - final)

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  • This 2013-14 school year can be characterized by historic education reform in our nation and within our state. This past summer the California legislature adopted a new school finance model called the “Local Control Funding Formula or LCFF.” This is the first time our state has changed the school funding methodology in almost fifty years. Additionally, most states across the nation have adopted, for the first time, the same set of academic standards. These are called the “Common Core State Standards.”
  • This presentation will focus on three key educational reform movements:Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF)Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP)Common Core State StandardsI’ll begin by reviewing the major components of the Local Control Funding Formula.
  • As our state was deliberating the school finance reform movement they narrowed their focus on five key goals:Ensuring equity and additional resources for students with greater needs: a) Low-income students; b) English learners; and c) Foster youth.The desire for the state to support local decision-making.Developing a system of accountability.Providing transparency regarding school budgeting.And, aligning the budget with an accountability plan.
  • For over four decades California has funded education through a school finance model made up of a base revenue limit or common amount of funding for students in elementary and secondary school. Additionally, in the past, school districts have been provided over forty categorical or restricted funds for programs such as, but not limited, to fine arts and music programs, professional development, school counseling and class size reduction programs, and more. Our past practice has held school funding separate from student achievement and accountability plans.By comparison, our state’s new school funding model, the Local Control Funding Formula provides a base amount of funding for students per grade span. Additionally, supplemental and concentration funding is provided to support at risk student populations who are dealing with poverty, learning English, or are foster youth. Class size reduction funds are provided at grades TK-3, however the target class size has increased to 24 students:1 teacher, and this ratio is required to be phased in by 2020-2021. Finally, an accountability plan must be aligned to the school district’s funding expenditure plan.
  • For the current 2013-14 school year all of the roughly 1,000 school districts in California were guaranteed a minimum level of funding for the first year of implementation of the LCFF formula. This minimum level of funding is the 2012-13 hold harmless amount or for our district about $5,078 per student. The LCFF formula aspires to gradually increase funding per student over the next eight years. Ultimately, the state hopes to fully fund the LCFF formula by 2020-2021. While this sounds exciting at first there are a few cautionary notes to consider:First, the legislature used the Department of Finance state revenue projections as the main source of funding for LCFF. This means that the state currently does not have the funding necessary to fully fund LCFF, but rather they are hoping the state’s economy rebounds from the Great Recession at a fast enough pace to fully fund LCFF by 2020-2021.Second, funding of the LCFF formula is also based on the state finding a way to backfill revenues generated from Proposition 30, which has a sales tax expiring in 2016 and an income tax expiring in 2018.Finally, it is not widely understood that fully funding the LCFF formula means that California will be restoring public education funding back to what we were funded in 2007-08 levels by 2020-21. Thus, the LCFF does not bring new money to education but rather “restores” the massive budget cuts of over 20% that education sustained over the 6 year period of the Great Recession. The good news is over the next eight years the state hopes to provide just over $200 per pupil more per year.
  • The LCFF funding formula is still being finalized at the state level and is scheduled to be released in January 2014. At this point school districts know that the LCFF will have four main components:There will be a Base Grant per Grade Span. This will make up the vast majority of the new funding model.Supplemental and concentration grants will be provided as additional revenues to support English learners, foster youth, and students living in poverty.And, “Add-Ons” will be given for TK-3 class size reduction and transportation.This chart shown is in “draft form” as the exact percentages of funding that will be provided for each of these categories will not be released by the state until January 2014.
  • The second part of our presentation is a review of the new “Local Control Accountability Plan or LCAP.”
  • Although the details and template for the Local Control Accountability Plan or LCAP will not be released by the state until about March 2014, we do know that there will be eight key components of the LCAP. The key areas of focus will be:Student AchievementStudent EngagementSchool ClimateOther Student OutcomesCredentials and MaterialsParent InvolvementCourse AccessImplementation of the Common Core Standards
  • Governing Boards will be expected to adopt an LCAP plan by July 1, 2014. As you heard earlier, the state plans to release the LCAP template for school districts to use in March 2014. The LCAP plans will be 3 year plans that are aligned to the budget and have annual student achievement goals.The state also requires that school districts adopt the coming school year’s budget no later than June 15 of each year. This means that we will need to adopt both the 2014-15 district budget and the LCAP plan end of May or beginning of June 2014.
  • When developing the district LCAP plan the state requires school districts to focus on the areas of “involvement” and “transparency”.In order to achieve the state’s criteria of involvement Governing Boards must consult with teachers, principals, school personnel, students, and local bargaining groups regarding the LCAP. Additionally, the district’s parent advisory committee and English Language Acquisition Committee (ELAC) must be allowed to review and comment on the LCAP plan. The superintendent must respond in writing to comments.Within the area of transparency the district must notify the public of an opportunity for written comment regarding the LCAP. In addition, the Board must hold two public hearings: one for recommendations and comments; and the other running concurrent to the public hearing for the budget.
  • Just as the county and state currently have fiduciary oversight of our district budget they will now also have oversight of our district’s LCAP plan. School districts will be required to submit their LCAP plans to the county office of education by August 15th of each year and then by October 8th the county office of education must indicate that they approve the district’s LCAP plan or indicate that the plan has strengths and weaknesses; provide an academic expert or team; or request that the state superintendent of public instruction assign the Collaborative for Educational Excellence to our district for assistance.The state has the authority to intervene if a district fails to improve outcomes for 3 or more subgroups during 3 of 4 consecutive years. If this happens the state may appoint an academic trustee, they may supersede the authority of the district’s Governing Board, they can impose budget revisions, and they can unilaterally make changes to a district’s LCAP plan.
  • This slide shows our district’s timeline for developing the LCAP.Between Nov and Jan we will be educating and consulting our stakeholders about the LCFF, LCAP, and Common Core StandardsFrom Nov to Feb we will also meet with district committees made up of teachers, principals, staff, students, bargaining groups, our district’s parent advisory groups, and the school ELACs and district DELACWe will analyze student achievement data and research from Nov through MarchFrom March through April we’ll establish the LCAP goalsIn May, shortly after the Governor releases his state budget we’ll align the LCAP goals with the district budgetBy mid-May we’ll publish the draft of our district’s LCAP plan on the district website and create an opportunity for written public commentsThe two required public hearings will take place during our Board meetings end of May and beginning of June 2014, located at the Lemon Grove Community Center at 6pm
  • Highlight the positive: Opportunity for Progress
  • Taken from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (2010), this chart demonstrates the value of education. Less education = Higher unemployment and lower wages
  • More than one quarter of the students met NO benchmarks.
  • Current standards: Lots of simple recallCurrent standards: “Mile wide, inch deep” result in a lack of focusCurrent standards: Completing a grade means something different in every state.
  • Note: No party affiliation, no presidential administrations past or present involved46 States voluntarily adopted (Texas, Virginia, Alaska and Nebraska did not)
  • Ask for thoughtful input and use feedback form described in the next slide. Note that we will continue to have Title II funds and 10% of Title I funds for professional development.
  • Now it is your turn to provide the district with your recommendations about the development of the Local Control Accountability Plan or LCAP. This slide is one you saw earlier in the presentation and it shows the 8 key areas of the LCAP plan:Student AchievementStudent EngagementSchool ClimateOther Student OutcomesCredentials and MaterialsParent InvolvementCourse AccessImplementation of the Common Core StandardsPlease take the next 15 minutes to gather into small groups of 2-4 people per group and discuss these 8 areas and come up with recommendations. At the close of 15 minutes your group will have an opportunity to write your recommendations on the charts around the room. Additionally, we will be providing you with individual feedback sheets that you may choose to complete and provide to the district as well.
  • Transcript

    • 1. EDUCATION IN TRANSITION: LOOKING AT CALIFORNIA’S NEW SCHOOL FUNDING MODEL AND THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS Lemon Grove School District 2013-14
    • 2. LOCAL CONTROL FUNDING FORMULA (LCFF)
    • 3. LEGISLATURE ENACTED AB 97 - LCFF  Equity & additional resources for students with greater needs: Low-income students  English learners  Foster youth   Local Decision-Making  Accountability  Transparency  Budget Alignment w/ Accountability Plan
    • 4. CALIFORNIA SCHOOL FINANCE BEFORE & AFTER LCFF Before LCFF  Base Revenue Limit Funding  40+ Categoricals  K-3 Class Size Reduction  Accountability Separate from Funding After LCFF  LCFF Base Grants by Grade Span  Supplemental & Concentration Grants (unduplicated counts)  K-3 Class Size Reduction – 24:1 phase in target  Local Control Accountability Plans
    • 5. 6,952 7,056 7,266 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 5,078 LCFF Increase 2012-13 LCFF BASE GRANT TARGET BY 2020-21 8000 2007-08 Restoration Funding Level
    • 6. LCFF FUNDING COMPONENTS Base Grant Supplemental Grant Concentration Grant CSR Adjustment Transportation & TIIG Add-Ons
    • 7. LOCAL CONTROL ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN (LCAP)
    • 8. Student Engagement Student Achievement School Climate Parent Involvement Credentials/ Materials Implementation of Common Core Standards Course Access 8 PARTS LOCAL CONTROL ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN Other Student Outcomes
    • 9. LCAP DEVELOPMENT TIMELINE  Governing Board Adopts LCAP by July 1, 2014 Template released March 2014  3-Year Plan   Align Plan to Budget Annual Goals for All Student Groups  Action Steps & Expenditures 
    • 10. LCAP DEVELOPMENT PROCESS Involvement  Boards must consult with: Teachers Principals School Personnel  Pupils  Local Bargaining Groups Transparency  Notify public of written comment opportunity  2 Public Hearings:    Present for Review & Comment:   Parent Advisory Committee ELAC  Superindent must respond in writing to comments received Recommendations & Comments  1 at Budget public hearing 
    • 11. COUNTY & STATE OVERSIGHT OF SCHOOL DISTRICT LCAP PROGRESS  County Office of Education   Aug 15 – Districts Send COE LCAP Oct 8 – COE Approves District LCAP or…  Identifies strengths & weaknesses  State Superintendent of Public Instruction Intervention IF…  District fails to improve outcomes for 3 or more subgroups 3 out of 4 consecutive years THEN…  Assigns academic expert/team Requests SPI assign the California Collaborative for Educational Excellence (CCEE) to provide assistance Appoint academic trustee  Stay & rescind Board action    Impose budget revisions  Make changes to LCAP
    • 12. LCAP DEVELOPMENT TIMELINE Action Steps 1. Educate & Consult w/ Stakeholders on LCFF, LCAP, & Common Core Standards Date Nov 2013 – Jan 2014 2. Meet w/ District Committees: - Teachers, Principals, Staff, Pupils, Bargaining Groups - Parent Advisory Committee - ELACs & DELAC 3. Analyze Student Achievement Data & Research 4. Establish LCAP Goals Nov 2013 – Feb 2014 Nov 2013 – March 2014 March – April 2014 5. Align LCAP Goals w/ Budget May 2014 6. Publish on District Website LCAP Draft & Written Comment Opportunity May 2014 7. Public Hearings May - June 2014
    • 13. COMMON CORE STANDARDS
    • 14. Common Core State Standards: An Opportunity for Progress
    • 15. THE VALUE OF EDUCATION
    • 16. ARE WE PREPARING OUR STUDENTS? Student achievement is drastically low. Our nation is at a moment of crisis when it comes to preparing our students for the rigors of college and the demands of the increasingly global workplace. http://www.act.org
    • 17. Why do we need Common Standards? -Low Levels of Rigor -Lack of Clarity -Inconsistencies
    • 18. What is the Common Core? Framework to prepare for college/work
    • 19. Where did it come from? National Governor’s Association Council of Chiefs of State Schools ACT (College testing) Achieve (Governors and Business) College Board Voluntarily adopted by states.
    • 20. How are Common Core Standards better? • • • • • • Increased complexity of texts Focus real-world situations Depth as opposed to breadth Focus on justifying and presenting Critical reading and writing in all areas Re-ordering of math content
    • 21. Benefits of Common Core Skills instead of recall Competitive in the job market
    • 22. Implementation Funds Two years to spend: $780,000 Technology Professional Development Instructional Materials
    • 23. Student Engagement Student Achievement School Climate Parent Involvement Credentials/ Materials Implementation of Common Core Standards Course Access 8 PARTS LOCAL CONTROL ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN Other Student Outcomes

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