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Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024
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Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024

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A presentation by Ms Ann Tutwiler, Director General, Bioversity International on ‘Bioversity International’s sharpened strategy’ on 28 May 2014.

A presentation by Ms Ann Tutwiler, Director General, Bioversity International on ‘Bioversity International’s sharpened strategy’ on 28 May 2014.

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    • 1. Presenter Ann Tutwiler Topic Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024 Date 28 May 2014 Venue Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research Acknowledgements: Ann Tutwiler(2014), Bioversity International Strategic Plan 2014-2024, ACIAR Seminar Series presentation, 28 May 2014, Canberra, Australia.
    • 2. STRATEGIC PLAN, 2014-2024
    • 3. BioversityInternationalY.Wachira OUR VISION: AGRICULTURAL BIODIVERSITY NOURISHES PEOPLE AND SUSTAINS THE PLANET
    • 4. Challenge: Increase Productivity Rising global food demand requires increased agricultural productivity and reduced food losses
    • 5. Challenge: Reduce Double Burden of Malnutrition  30 million overweight children live in developing countries  Number of overweight adults in developing countries tripled between 1980 and 2010  Malnourished children lose 10% of lifelong earnings
    • 6. Challenge: Adapt to Climate Change  Up to 40% of the world will develop novel climates, often with new pest and disease complexes
    • 7. Challenge: Reduce Vulnerability  Up to 30% of arable land is marginal and fragile land  Desertification and drought affect 1.5 billion people
    • 8. Challenge: Expand Options  Increasing crop yields and stress tolerance requires genetic diversity  Intensification of agricultural systems has led to a substantial reduction of biodiversity
    • 9. Biodiversity Offers Solutions Convention on Biodiversity International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture Commission on Plant Genetic Resources
    • 10. OUR MISSION: TO DELIVER SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE, MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND POLICY OPTIONS TO USE AND SAFEGUARD AGRICULTURAL BIODIVERSITY TO ATTAIN SUSTAINABLE GLOBAL FOOD AND NUTRITION SECURITY
    • 11. Our Strategic Objectives Strategic Objective 1: Low-income consumers have expanded access to and use of affordable, nutritious diets. Strategic Objective 2: Rural communities have increased the productivity, ecosystem services and resilience of farming systems, forests and landscapes. Strategic Objective 3: Farm households and rural communities have increased access to a diversity of quality seeds and other planting materials Strategic Objective 4: Policymakers, scientists and rural communities have safeguarded, assessed and are monitoring priority agricultural biodiversity.
    • 12. Our Theory of Change
    • 13. Strategic Objective One: Consume Strategic Sub-Components  Farm households and rural communities manage nutrition sensitive landscapes  Agrifood sectors mainstream nutrition sensitive value chains  Households improve dietary quality through a whole of diet approach Bioversity International will  Investigate how agricultural biodiversity within food production systems and the access to nutritionally-rich food sources contribute to dietary diversity  Identify effective and equitable policies to close nutritional gaps and improve the quality of diets through diversity For example: climate change and nutritional resilience
    • 14. Strategic Objective Two: Produce Strategic Sub-components  Farm households use agricultural biodiversity to sustainably intensify their systems, reduce enterprise risk and increase profitability  Rural communities benefit from managing diversity in forests  Rural communities integrate agricultural biodiversity into landscape management practices for enhanced ecosystem services Bioversity International will  Explore how the use of agricultural biodiversity within broader landscapes to improve rural livelihoods, productivity, resilience, and deliver ecosystem services. For example: restoration of degraded lands
    • 15. Strategic Objective Three: Plant Strategic Sub-components:  Farm households and rural communities use a diversity of planting materials to enhance productivity, nutrition and adaptation  Formal and informal seed systems deliver high quality, diverse planting materials required by farm households and rural communities Bioversity International will  Work with stakeholders to develop ‘smart seed systems’ that are responsive to biotic and abiotic stresses to improve productivity, resilience, dietary diversity and quality  Develop policy options in support of high quality, diversified seed systems For example: banana disease management
    • 16. Strategic Objective Four: Safeguard Strategic Sub-components  Global treaties and conventions use a shared mechanism for monitoring agricultural biodiversity status and trends  National policymakers adopt mechanisms for safeguarding agricultural biodiversity and knowledge  Farm households, rural communities, scientists, breeders and policymakers have information on priority traits Bioversity International will  Develop systems for providing farm households and rural communities, scientists, breeders and policymakers with information on priority traits.  Promote global actions for monitoring and safeguarding priority agricultural biodiversity to increase current and future options for improved productivity and nutrition. For example: Coconut Genebank; Timber Tracking
    • 17. Focus: People and Global Public Goods People  Farm households  Rural communities and landscapes  Urban consumers  Women and children Global Public Goods  International treaties and conventions  Banana, Coconut Genebanks
    • 18. Focus: Markets  Value Chains: nutrition and resilience  Commercial and pre- commercial systems: rural and urban markets  Marginal and remote regions, local production and consumption  Poor and vulnerable communities: nutrition- oriented interventions and social policies
    • 19. Geography Limited number of low-income countries or ecosystems in Asia- Pacific, Mekong, India sub-continent, East/Central/West Africa, Central American, Andes Criteria will include:  high levels of agricultural biodiversity;  high vulnerability to climate change;  high levels of malnutrition.  long-standing Bioversity partnerships and CRP engagement Emerging partner countries, e.g Brazil
    • 20. Crops and Trees  Cropping systems and forests  Neglected and underutilised species,  Nutritionally and economically useful trees, and  Vegetatively-propagated crops  Generate income  Enhance resilience and adaptive capacity of production systems  Improve dietary quality  Secure future options
    • 21. CGIAR Research Programs  Humidtropics; Drylands; Aquatic Agricultural Systems  Policy, Institutions and Markets  Roots, Tubers and Bananas  Agriculture for Nutrition and Health  Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security  Water, Land and Ecosystems  Forests, Trees and Agroforestry
    • 22. Partners  National research systems  Advanced research institutes  Development organisations and international bodies  Local, national and global agri-food value chain actors  Timber concessionaries  Conservation organisations
    • 23. Why Bioversity International?  Biodiversity integrates multiple scientific disciplines to provide an agricultural biodiversity lens on the adaptation of food systems to climate change, rural transformation, provision of environmental services, nutrition and dietary transformation  Biodiversity boasts expertise in value chains, nutrition, landscape ecology, environmental services, information management, bioinformatics and genomics  Biodiversity combines multidisciplinary team of agronomists, population geneticists, plant breeders, entomologists, economics, anthropologists, law and policy  Bioversity brings strong partnerships with NARs, farmers organizations and NGOs
    • 24. www.bioversityinternational.org

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