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Bruce Cogill (Bioversity) - Nutrition and Marketing Diversity Programme
 

Bruce Cogill (Bioversity) - Nutrition and Marketing Diversity Programme

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Presentation to the AIFSC-ILRI Nutrition Workshop

Presentation to the AIFSC-ILRI Nutrition Workshop

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  • Also SecondaryBeneficaries – Global Public Goods

Bruce Cogill (Bioversity) - Nutrition and Marketing Diversity Programme Bruce Cogill (Bioversity) - Nutrition and Marketing Diversity Programme Presentation Transcript

  • Nutrition and Marketing Diversity Programme Bruce Cogill P.h.D Bioversity International Nutrition and Marketing Diversity Programme Leader AIFSC Workshop “Food and nutrition in Eastern and Southern Africa” Nairobi, Kenya 10-11 September CGIAR Research Program on 1 Agriculture for Nutrition and Health
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  • Underlying model of determinants of nutritional status Better Education in Health Program Cash to Health visits Education safer & Nutrition to women (Condition) (Condition) foods Women HH Income Women’s School + Women Women’s Use of H&N Knowledge & Enrollment + Income time Services Awareness Attendance Control Underlying Causes Health Education Supply Supply HH Food Security Informed and Feeding & – Diet Diversity/ Educated Care WASH Quality/ population Practices Quantity esp. girls Immediate Causes Outcomes Long term Food Intake Health NutritionAdapted from Ruel
  • Bioversity and A4NH Conceptual Framework Strategic goal of A4NH: Accelerate progress in improvingHealththe nutrition and health of poor people by leveraging agriculture and enhancing the 1. Enhancing 3. Prevention & synergies inalong efforts between agriculture, health and Nutrition joint 4. Integrated Control of Ag- nutrition Chain the Value Programs and Policies Associated Diseases 2. Bio- Nutrition fortification Agriculture Social Behavior Change and Communications All componentsImproved availability, Increased Increased Decreased Increased access, intake knowledge labor risk of AAD income and of nutritious, of nutrition, productivity gender equity safe foods food safety RESULT: Improved nutrition and health, especially among women and young children
  • Focus areas Bioversity for the Initial Research Priorities in A4NH NUTRITIONAL VALUE CHAINS • Revise current value chain frameworks and assessments to better include nutritional quality (and food safety) • Co-develop specific opportunities for enhancing nutritional quality for women, infants and young children in value chains for nutrient rich foods INTEGRATED PROGRAMS AND POLICIES • Strengthen program evaluation, working with partners, including new cross-sectoral metrics and approaches • Cross-sectoral priorities and policies with key partners in SSA and South Asia
  • Major objectives of Bioversity’s Nutrition work1. Strengthen the evidence base for the role of biodiversity in nutrition and health and incorporating agricultural biodiversity into food and nutrition systems approaches2. Conduct operations research on agricultural biodiversity practices and delivery systems in development and emergency programmes to improve food and nutrition security3. Promote the production and value chains of more nutritious foods that reflect agricultural biodiverse practices and cultural preferences through commercial pathways4. Inform policy and practice of evidence and provide solutions at the policy level by mainstreaming the importance of agricultural biodiversity into nutrition and public health sectors GLOBAL PUBLIC GOODS 6
  • Nutrition Strategy Objectives and Components1) Strengthen the evidence base for the role of biodiversity 2) Conduct operations research on agricultural biodiversityin nutrition and health and incorporating agricultural practices and delivery systems in development andbiodiversity into food and nutrition systems approaches emergency programmes to improve food & nutrition securityA) Agricultural biodiversity in diets, health and livelihoods A) Consumer demand, knowledge and access as drivers forB) Value of agricultural biodiversity in food and nutrition smallholder farmers to produce and consume moreSystems nutritious, diversified foodC) Nutritional anthropology and sociology of agricultural B) Agricultural biodiversity as a mechanism for boostingbiodiversity disposable income for smallholder farmers allowing them to access more nutritious foods3) Promote the production of more nutritious foods that 4) Inform policy and practice of evidence and providereflect agricultural biodiverse practices and cultural solutions at the policy level by mainstreaming thepreferences through commercial pathways (value chains) importance of agricultural biodiversity into nutrition and public health sectorsA) Integration of agricultural biodiversity in emergency and A) Contribute to international efforts that address globaldevelopment programmes concerns, such as the response to soaring food prices, foodB) Value of agricultural biodiversity in food and nutrition sovereignty and the effects of globalization of diets on healthsystems, fully integrated with the other components of the through its assessment of the nutritional and livelihoodfood system approach benefits of local foods and food products derived from the rich biodiversity in the developing world 7
  • Primary Beneficiaries1. Rural small holder farmers in the developing world2. Populations living in peri-urban and urban settings without access to diversity3. Communities at risk of food system loss 8
  • Our ProjectsCost of Diets:• Quantifying the role of local, wild and underutilized foods in contributing to a nutritionally acceptable diet while optimizing cost• With Museum of Kenya and Save the ChildrenFoodAfrica:• Strengthening the local knowledge and expertise of agricultural &related sciences• Identify current infant and child feeding practices in Rural BeninMarket Integration:• Assess the relative nutritional benefits of a diversity of locally-produced traditional foods produced at different access points to marketsKenya Inula Nutrition Study:• To examine the influence of agrobiodiversity on dietary diversity and quality, and on nutritional health of women and infants/children under two yearsCapacity Strengthening:• Train agriculturalists and nutritionists in research approaches to nutrition sensitive agricultureBiodiversity for Food and Nutrition Project• Strengthen the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity with high nutritional potential, by mainstreaming into nutrition, food and livelihood security strategies and programmes; develop markets and value chains for nutritionally-relevant biodiversity. Cross cutting is Capacity Strengthening and Gender Focus 9
  • NEW DIRECTIONS Sustainable Diets Project• Gaps in our understanding of what constitutes a sustainable diet• Examples from studies of the Mediterranean Diet• Need to value biodiversity and nutrition plus other dimensions• New research on describing, measuring and promoting sustainable diets• Determine indicators and guidelines aimed at measuring sustainability of diets worldwide• Bioversity with the support of Daniel et Nina Carasso Foundation and a network of universities and research groups 10
  • Sustainable Diets Nutritional adequacy 6 5 4 3 Cultural acceptability 2 Environmental sustainability 1 Urban poor Rural poor Target Low cost – accessibility 11 Bioversity International ©
  • • Acute protein-energy malnutrition Undernutrition ↓ • Moderate Iron deficiency Overnutrition ↑ anaemia and VAD •31% overweight Native root and tuber •12% obese crops, traditional riceUndernutrition ↓ Project aim: Strengthen the conservationOvernutrition ↑ varieties, leafy vegetables and50% of adult population and sustainable use of biodiversity with high 28 spp. local native fruitsoverweight (80 million) nutritional potential, by mainstreaming into edible plant species nutrition, food and livelihood securityPlants for the FutureProject (70 spp.) strategies and programmes; developNon conventional leafy markets and value chains for nutritionally- •1/3 of the population is food insecurevegetables relevant biodiversity. •1.8 million children chronically undernourished ALVs, sorghum, millets, nuts and oil crops, indigenous fruits and livestock5 year project : 2012 - 2017PROVIDE EVIDENCE – Demonstrate the nutritional value of local BFN and the role it plays inpromoting healthy diets and strengthening livelihoodsINFLUENCE POLICIES - Use the evidence to influence policies and markets that support theconservation and sustainable use of BFN for improved human nutrition and wellbeingRAISE AWARENESS – Develop tools and best practices for scaling up the use BFN in developmentprogrammes, value chains and local community initiatives.