Achieving the Systems Based Practice (SBP) Competency by Implementing a Web Based Business of Medicine Curriculum. <ul><li...
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Achieving the Systems-Based Practice (SBP) Competency by Implementing a Web-Based Business of Medicine Curriculum

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Achieving the Systems-Based Practice (SBP) Competency by Implementing a Web-Based Business of Medicine Curriculum

  1. 1. Achieving the Systems Based Practice (SBP) Competency by Implementing a Web Based Business of Medicine Curriculum. <ul><li>ABSTRACT </li></ul><ul><li>TITLE: Achieving the Systems Based Practice (SBP) Competency by Implementing a Web Based Business of Medicine Curriculum. </li></ul><ul><li>Paul A. Taheri MD, MBA, Deborah Harkins RN, MBA, David A. Butz Ph.D. </li></ul><ul><li>BACKGROUND: </li></ul><ul><li>The focus of the SBP competency is to encourage physicians to leverage health system assets to provide optimal care to patients. Health systems are complex capital-intensive businesses which typically are poorly integrated, have diffuse governance structures, and are increasingly bottom line focused. Physicians often manage these complex business entities with little or no formal business training. Physicians need to understand the fundamental principles of business applied to health care. </li></ul><ul><li>OBJECTIVE: </li></ul><ul><li>To assess the learning outcome and satisfaction of a web-based business curriculum specifically developed for house officers. </li></ul><ul><li>METHODS: </li></ul><ul><li>Access to a curriculum of 28 web-based modules covering topics such as economics, finance, operations management, physician leadership, and other business disciplines was provided to 101 house officers in multiple training programs across the USA. Pre and post testing was performed at the outset and upon post curriculum completion. Overall satisfaction with the curriculum was also assessed. </li></ul><ul><li>RESULTS: </li></ul><ul><li>A total of 101 residents from University of Michigan, Henry Ford Health System, Banner Good Samaritan and the American Board of Surgery completed the curriculum. Mean pre test score was 55 + 11 and mean post-test was 75 + 11.6. On average, residents completed modules in 35 minutes. The vast majority of residents rated the curriculum well organized, relevant, an excellent learning experience and overall a positive experience, with the content not taught elsewhere in training. </li></ul><ul><li>CONCLUSIONS: </li></ul><ul><li>The findings of this analysis demonstrate that this business curriculum is easy to use, cost effective, demonstrates learning and provides a credible platform for achieving the Systems Based Practice competency. </li></ul><ul><li>NEXT STEPS: </li></ul><ul><li>This business curriculum easily disseminates to any and all interested training programs. Recently, the curriculum has been fully incorporated into the American Board of Surgery on-line SCORE curriculum. </li></ul><ul><li>BACKGROUND </li></ul><ul><li>A comprehensive, coordinated, competency-based curriculum to help achieve the Systems Based Practice competency is difficult to develop, deliver, and track, as typical house officer programs lack the necessary expertise. An on-line curriculum, developed by a General Surgeon and Health Care Economist, was designed to provide participants with the necessary tools and business competencies required to achieve the SBP competency. Participants complete a demographic survey, pre-test, online modules, quizzes after each module and a post test to define completion (See Figures 1-3 for screen shots from the course). </li></ul>Paul Taheri, MD, MBA 1 ; Deborah Harkins, RN, BSN, MBA 1,2 ; David Butz, PhD 1,3 , MDContent, 1 University of Michigan Health System 2 , University of Michigan Ross School of Business 3 Ann Arbor, MI 48104 OBJECTIVE To assess the learning outcome and satisfaction of a web-based business curriculum specifically developed for house officers. <ul><li>METHODS </li></ul><ul><li>Participants and Curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>101 residents participated in the Business of Health Care Curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Residents from across the USA completed the curriculum. Participants were from various specialty area (Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Family Medicine…) and represented a number of institutions including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>University of Michigan, Henry Ford Health System, Banner Good Samaritan Phoenix </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The American Board of Surgery . </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Individual institutions customized their curriculum from the 28 web based modules, and participants engaged in pre-test and post-test evaluations. </li></ul><ul><li>Each module is approximately 30 minutes in length. </li></ul><ul><li>All participants engaged in summary course evaluation and results were sent to the resident and Program Director. </li></ul><ul><li>House Officer Demographics </li></ul><ul><li>RESULTS </li></ul><ul><li>Pre and Post tests were analyzed for the first 12 modules. </li></ul><ul><li>Mean pre-test score was 55 + 11 and mean post-test was 75 + 11.6 (see table 1 and 2). </li></ul><ul><li>Overall curriculum satisfaction was assessed </li></ul><ul><li> A majority of residents (>90%) rated the curriculum well organized, relevant, an excellent learning experience and overall a positive experience. </li></ul><ul><li>On average, participants completed each module in 35 minutes. </li></ul>CONCLUSIONS The findings of this analysis demonstrate that this business curriculum is easy to use, cost effective, facilitates learning and provides a credible platform for achieving the systems based practice competency. House officers have little business training and are interested in more business content. This curriculum easily disseminates to any and all interested programs. Recently, the curriculum has been incorporated into the American Board of Surgery on-line SCORE curriculum. RESULTS Table 1: All House officers For additional information please contact: Paul Taheri MD, MBA Principal, MDContent President of the Faculty Practice Fletcher Allen Healthcare, University of Vermont [email_address] <ul><li>Business Background </li></ul><ul><ul><li>None – 38 (58%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Minimal - 24 (36%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Moderate - 3 (4%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Extensive - 1 (1%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interest in Learning about Business </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>None - 7 (11%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Minimal – 18 (27%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Moderate – 34 (51%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Extensive – 7 (11%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Gender </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Female - 22 (22%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Male – 34 (61%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Training Level </li></ul><ul><ul><li>PGY < 3 – 77 (78%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PGY > 4 – 22 (22%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Economics and Cost Accounting </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>What It Costs to Deliver Care </li></ul><ul><li>Allocating Overhead </li></ul><ul><li>The Throughput Imperative </li></ul><ul><li>Who Pays for Healthcare </li></ul><ul><li>How Hospitals are Paid </li></ul><ul><li>How Physicians are Paid </li></ul><ul><li>Historical Background </li></ul><ul><li>Operations Management </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to Operations Management </li></ul><ul><li>Little’s Law </li></ul><ul><li>Bottlenecks and Critical Pathways </li></ul><ul><li>Managing Variability </li></ul><ul><li>Legal and Institutional Safeguards </li></ul><ul><li>Healthcare Compliance </li></ul><ul><li>Conflict of Interest </li></ul><ul><li>Quality Assurance </li></ul><ul><li>Applied Quality Assurance </li></ul><ul><li>Medical Liability </li></ul><ul><li>Financial Stewardship </li></ul><ul><li>Health Systems’ Financial Underpinnings </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to Corporate Finance </li></ul><ul><li>Applying Finance to Healthcare </li></ul><ul><li>Capital Budgeting Process </li></ul><ul><li>Practical Advice Capital Budgeting </li></ul><ul><li>CT Scanner Case Study </li></ul><ul><li>Physician Organization and Leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing Physician Practices (in production) </li></ul><ul><li>Radiology Reimbursement </li></ul><ul><li>The Medical Staff and its By-Laws </li></ul><ul><li>Physician Group Practices </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiations and Physician Contracting </li></ul><ul><li>Physician Leadership I </li></ul><ul><li>Physician Leadership II </li></ul>Table 2: American Board of Surgery Business of Healthcare Curriculum 3 (4%) 5 (8%) 17 (26%) 31 (48%) 9 (14%) I would enthusiastically recommend MDContent to a resident in my specialty. 2 (3%) 4 (6%) 15 (23%) 35 (55%) 8 (13%) Overall, the MDContent learning experience was excellent. 4 (6%) 7 (11%) 28 (42%) 27 (41%) The MDContent Curriculum represents content not taught elsewhere in medical school or residency. 2 (3%) 3 (4%) 11 (17%) 38 (58%) 7 (11%) Participation in this activity has improved my skills for conducting systems-based medical practice. 2 (3%) 3 (4%) 11 (17%) 38 (58%) 12 (18%) Participation in this activity has improved my knowledge about system-based medical practice (SBP). 2 (3%) 10 (15%) 48 (73%) 6 (9%) The testing component of the curriculum reflected the content presented. 5 (8%) 4 (6%) 18 (28%) 32 (49%) 6 (9%) The presentation held my interest. 1 (1%) 2 (3%) 6 (9%) 52 (79%) 5 (8%) I achieved the stated objectives of each module. 4 (6%) 11 (17%) 22 (34%) 26 (40%) 2 (3%) The curriculum is relevant to the daily clinical work I currently perform as a resident. 1 (2%) 1 (2%) 10 (15%) 45 (69%) 8 (12%) The content of the MDContent curriculum was well-organized. Strongly Agree Disagree Neutral Agree Strongly Agree Course Evaluation Questions Figure 1. Opening Web Interface for MDContent Course Figure 2. Sample content from learning modules Figure 3. Sample question from module quiz
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