Seven Ways DCS Systems can Save you 20%

927 views
863 views

Published on

Seven ways white paper.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
927
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
50
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Seven Ways DCS Systems can Save you 20%

  1. 1.                 Seven Ways Today’s   Distributed Control   Systems (DCS)   Can Save You 20% or More        In the past, DCS Systems were large, expensive and  very complex.  This drove many control engineers  to use Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) and  Human Machine Interface (HMI) in order to lower  cost. Today, these implementations are  consistently more expensive than DCS systems for  the same process or batch application.     This report documents the key advantages of DCS  systems over PLC/HMI engineered systems and the  typical value of each.    
  2. 2. Executive Summary  This report has been developed to help show how you can significantly reduce the cost of your process automation.  As you probably know, integrating independent PLC’s and required operator interface, takes a great amount of time and effort.  This effort is focused on making the technology work together, rather than improving operations, reducing costs, or improving the quality or profitability of your plant.   Many engineers do not normally think about it but a PLC/HMI system may have a subset, if not all, of the following unique and manually coordinated databases.    • Each controller and its associated I/O  • HMI (potentially multiple HMIs)  • Alarm Management   • Batch / Recipe and PLI  • Redundancy at all levels  • Historian  • Asset Optimization  • Fieldbus device management  Each of these databases must be manually kept in sync. Every time a change is made in one, others usually need to be updated to reflect the change.  For example, when an I/O point and some control logic is added you probably need to change or add a HMI element, the Historian and the Alarm database.  This means your engineers must make these changes in each of these databases, not just one.   In another scenario a change may be made in an alarm setting in a control loop.  In a PLC implementation there is no automatic connection between the PLC and the HMI.  This can be a large problem during start up of a new application where alarm limits are being constantly tweaked in the controller to work out the process while trying to keep the Alarm Management and HMI applications up to date with the changes and useful to the operator.   Key Advantages Today’s DCS systems (also known as Process Control Systems) are developed to allow you to quickly implement the entire system by integrating all of these databases into one which is designed, configured and operated from the same application. The table below explains how savings can be realized by using today’s DCS System over a PLC/HMI system.  This information has been collected from decades of implementation expertise of ABB engineers, end user controls engineers, consultants, and multiple Systems Integrators who actively implement both types of control solutions based on application requirement and user preferences.         Page 2    
  3. 3.   PLC/HMI  Process Control System  *Time savings  (DCS)  with Process  Control Engineering  Control Engineers must map  As control logic is  15‐25%  out system integration  designed, alarming, HMI  depending on  between HMI, alarming,  and system  how much  controller communications,  communications are  HMI and  and multiple controllers for  automatically configured.   alarming is  every new project.    being    One software  designed into  Control addresses (tags)  configuration tool is used  the system.  must be manually mapped in  to set up one database  engineering documents to  used by all system  the rest of the system.    components.      This manual process is time  As the Control Engineer  consuming and error prone.  designs the control logic,    the rest of the system falls  Engineers also have to learn  into place.   multiple software tools,    which can often take weeks  The simplicity of this  of time.  approach allows engineers  to understand this  environment in a matter  of a few days.  Programming   Control logic, alarming,  When control logic is  15%‐45%   system communications and  developed, HMI  HMI are programmed  Faceplates, alarms and  independently. Control  system communications  Engineers are responsible to  are automatically  integrate/link multiple  configured.   databases to create the    system.       Faceplates automatically    appear using the same  Items to be manually  alarm levels and scalability  duplicated in every element  set up in the control logic.   of the system include.  These critical data  ‐ Scalability data  elements are only set up  ‐ Alarm levels   once in the system.   ‐ Tag locations    (addresses)  This substantially reduces    the time it takes to  Only basic control is  engineer and implement a  available.  Extensions in  system and errors in the  functionality needs to be  system.        Page 3    
  4. 4.   PLC/HMI  Process Control System  *Time savings  (DCS)  with Process  Control  created on a per application    basis. (e.g. Feed Forward,  This is analogous to having  Tracking, Self tuning,  your calendars on your  Alarming…) This approach  desktop and phone  leads to non‐standard  automatically sync vs.  applications, which are  having to retype every  tedious to operate and  appointment in both  maintain.   devices.  People who try to    keep two calendars in sync  Redundancy is rarely used  manually find it takes  with PLC’s.  One reason is the  twice the time and the  difficulty in setting it up and  calendars are rarely ever in  managing meaningful  sync.  redundancy for the    application.    Redundancy is set up in  software quickly and  easily, nearly with a click  of a button.  Commissioning  Testing a PLC / HMI system is  Process Control Systems  10‐20% and Start up  normally conducted on the  come with the ability to  depending on  job site after all of the wiring  automatically simulate the  the complexity  is completed and the  process based on the logic,  of the start up  production manager is asking  HMI and alarms that are  and  “why is the system not  going to be used by the  commissioning  running yet?”   operator at the plant.      Off line simulation is  This saves significant time  possible, but this takes an  on‐site since the  extensive effort of  programming has already  programming to write code  been tested before the  which will simulates the  wiring is begun.    application you are  controlling.  Due to the high  cost and complex  programming, this is rarely  done. Troubleshooting  Powerful troubleshooting  All information is  10‐40%  tools are available for use if  automatically available to  (Varies greatly  the controls engineer  the operator based on the  based on the  programs them into the  logic being executed in the  time spent  system.   controllers.    developing      HMI and       Page 4    
  5. 5.   PLC/HMI  Process Control System  *Time savings  (DCS)  with Process  Control  For example, if an input or  This greatly reduces the  alarming, and  output is connected to the  time it takes to identify  keeping the  system, the control logic will  the issues and get your  system up to  be programmed into utilize  facility up and running  date.)   the control point.  But when  again.   this is updated, did the data    get linked to the desperate  The operator also has  HMI?  Have alarms been set  access to view the  up to alert operators of  graphical function blocks  problems? Are these points  as they run to see what is  being communicated to the  working and not. (read  other controllers?  only)      Programming logic is rarely  Root Cause Analysis is  exposed to the operator  standard.  since it is in a different    software tool and not  Field Device diagnostics  intuitive for an operator to  (HART and Fieldbus) are  understand.   available from the  operator console.  Ability to change  Changing the control logic to  Adding or changing logic in  20‐25% to meet process  meet new application  the system is also very  savings on requirements   requirements is relatively  easy.  In many cases even  changes is not  easy.  The challenge comes  easier to change logic with  uncommon.    with additional requirements  built in and custom  to integrate the new  libraries of code.   functionality to the Operator    Stations.  Also,  When changes are made,  documentation should be  the data entered into the  developed for every change.   control logic is  This does not happen as  automatically propagated  much as it should.  to all aspects of the    system. This means far less  If you were to change an  errors and the “system”  input point to a new address  has been changed with  or tag, that change must be  just a single change in the  manually propagated  control logic.   throughout the system.      Operator  Operator Training is the  Training for operators is  10‐15% is Training   responsibility of the  available from the process  common in  developer of the application.   control vendor. This is due  training costs       Page 5    
  6. 6.   PLC/HMI  Process Control System  *Time savings  (DCS)  with Process  Control  There is no operator training  to the standardized way  reduction, but  from the vendor since every  information is presented  this can be  faceplate, HMI screen or  to operators.  magnified  Alarm management function    with the  can be set up differently  This can significantly  constancy  from the next. Even within a  reduce operator training  found across  single application operators  costs and quality due to  operators.  could see different graphics  the common and expected  for different areas of the  operator interface on any  application they are  application, no matter  monitoring.  who implements the  system.  System  Documentation is based on  As the control logic is  30‐50% due to documentation  each part of the overall  changed, documentation  the nature of  system.  As each element is  for all aspects of the  the system  changed, documentation  system is automatically  being put in  must be created to keep  created.   place.   each document up to date.   Again, this rarely happens,  causing many issues with  future changes and  troubleshooting. * Time savings based on typical costs associated with a system using ~500 I/O, Two controllers, One workstation and 25 PID Loops.              Page 6    
  7. 7. Your Customized Results As you know, these are “typical savings”.  Your individual savings will vary from the estimates, and may vary greatly.   To help you determine the savings for your application we have two tools to assist you.  1) A self help tool, the Custom Process Evaluation Worksheet (can be found at  http://www.abbprocess.com/files/Process_Eval_Worksheet.xls). After you download  this tool you will be able to change the cells highlighted in yellow to give you an idea  where the savings can be found in your application. An example of the worksheet is  shown below.    Sample Process Application  2 Controllers, 500 I/O with 25 PID loops, One Workstation which also monitors other parts of the facility  Project Phase PLC / HMI Process Control System Hours $/Hour Cost Typical Savings Cost Engineering 210 $120 $25,200 20% $20,160 Purchase Price N/A N/A $45,000 0% $45,000 Programming/Implementation 160 $120 $19,200 45% $10,560 Installation/wiring 200 $120 $24,000 0% $24,000 Integration 60 $120 $7,200 95% $360 Commissioning 20 $120 $2,400 40% $1,440 Troubleshooting (cost per hour 10 $10,000 $100,000 20% $80,000 includes plant downtime) Upgrade the process 100 $120 $12,000 45% $6,600 Training / Documentation 60 $120 $7,200 50% $3,600 Total $242,200 21% $191,720   2) Our local ABB Process Control Expert can be contacted to deliver a “Custom Process  Evaluation” and assist you in the completion of the worksheet.  Many engineers find this  20‐30 minute discussion helpful since our experts understand both the DCS and  PLC/HMI architectures well and can help you understand where the savings shown in  the worksheet really comes from. To find your local rep, please call 800 435 7365,  option #2, then #5.  Conclusion  If you are using PLC’s and HMI to control your process or batch applications, your application is a great candidate to reduce costs and gain better control.  Your savings would be significant and will continue to lower your costs over the life of your system. We look forward to helping you identify these savings and realize them in your next implementation.        Page 7    

×