Can financial education and social support enhance the effectiveness of an adolescent HIV prevention program?Evidence from...
Setting<br />Semi-rural KwaZulu Natal<br />Poverty and income inequality<br />Unemployment<br />Early pregnancy<br />Early...
Formative research: vulnerabilities associated with adolescent HIV risk behaviors<br />Living in poverty<br />Social isola...
Poorer more likely to sexually debut earlier<br />Ever had sex:  14-16 year-olds<br />Poor<br />Non-poor<br />Source: Hall...
Those with less social capital <br />more likely to experience forced sex<br />Ever forced sex:14-16 year-old females<br /...
Orphans have more <br />economically-motivated sexual encounters<br />Ever traded sex:  sexually debuted 14-16-year-olds<b...
Possible protective factors<br />Education<br />Hope for the future<br />Access to financial services and social grants<br...
Purpose<br />Improve functional capabilities and well-being of adolescents at high risk for:<br />	HIV and STIs		teenage p...
Program Methods and Sample<br /> Intervention<br />Evidence-based<br />In-school<br />Multi-sectoral<br />Participatory<br...
Randomization<br />HIV education, social support + financial capabilities<br />HIV education and social support<br />Delay...
Some very early results<br />
How powerful do you feel?<br />Males		Females<br />
Awareness of social grants<br />Males				Females<br />
Very or somewhat confident know how to use a condom correctly<br />Males	*			Females<br />
Have drugs or alcohol affected your sexual decisionmaking in the last 12 months?<br />Males	*			Females<br />
Partner reduction-mean # in last year<br />Males				Females<br />
Summary<br />Females feel more powerful<br />More awareness of social grants<br />More confidence in condom use<br />Sexua...
“It’s different, in school we learn mathematics and biology but here we learn things that we can use in the future.”<br />...
Participant views <br />“….. I didn’t understand about HIV and AIDS before <br />but now I do. I didn’t learn that in scho...
What the learners say about the program<br />It is good for young people like me because it teaches about things that happ...
Selected resources<br />Hallman, K.  2008a.“Researching the determinants of vulnerability to HIV amongst adolescents,” IDS...
Much more analysis to come<br />Some promising indications already<br />More disaggregation<br />Age, orphan status, house...
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Countdown to 2015, Challenging Orthodoxies on SRH and HIV meeting: Can financial education and social support enhance the effectiveness of an adolescent HIV prevention program? Evidence from the Siyakha Nentsha program in KwaZulu-Natal

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  • Among those who attended at least one available session* Stat sig change from R1 to R2 for that group
  • ArmplusNo diff at R1, sig diff at R2
  • Countdown to 2015, Challenging Orthodoxies on SRH and HIV meeting: Can financial education and social support enhance the effectiveness of an adolescent HIV prevention program? Evidence from the Siyakha Nentsha program in KwaZulu-Natal

    1. 1. Can financial education and social support enhance the effectiveness of an adolescent HIV prevention program?Evidence from the Siyakha Nentsha program in KwaZulu-Natal<br />Kelly Hallman, Eva Roca, Kasthuri Govender, Emmanuel Mbatha, <br />Rob Pattman, DeeviaBhana, Mike Rogan, and Hannah Taboada <br />Countdown to 2015: Challenging orthodoxies related to SRH and HIV  <br />London May 17, 2010<br />
    2. 2. Setting<br />Semi-rural KwaZulu Natal<br />Poverty and income inequality<br />Unemployment<br />Early pregnancy<br />Early school leaving<br />HIV<br />
    3. 3. Formative research: vulnerabilities associated with adolescent HIV risk behaviors<br />Living in poverty<br />Social isolation<br />Orphaning<br />Source: Hallman 2004, 2005, 2008a, 2008b, 2008c<br />
    4. 4. Poorer more likely to sexually debut earlier<br />Ever had sex: 14-16 year-olds<br />Poor<br />Non-poor<br />Source: Hallman 2005, 2008a<br />
    5. 5. Those with less social capital <br />more likely to experience forced sex<br />Ever forced sex:14-16 year-old females<br />Source: Hallman 2008a, 2008b<br />
    6. 6. Orphans have more <br />economically-motivated sexual encounters<br />Ever traded sex: sexually debuted 14-16-year-olds<br />Source: Hallman 2008a, 2008c<br />
    7. 7. Possible protective factors<br />Education<br />Hope for the future<br />Access to financial services and social grants<br />Social support<br />
    8. 8. Purpose<br />Improve functional capabilities and well-being of adolescents at high risk for:<br /> HIV and STIs teenage pregnancy parenthood<br /> school dropout loss of one or both parents<br /> lack of knowledge of further employment and training opportunities<br />
    9. 9. Program Methods and Sample<br /> Intervention<br />Evidence-based<br />In-school<br />Multi-sectoral<br />Participatory<br />Intensive – multi-session<br />Accredited<br />
    10. 10. Randomization<br />HIV education, social support + financial capabilities<br />HIV education and social support<br />Delayed intervention<br />
    11. 11. Some very early results<br />
    12. 12. How powerful do you feel?<br />Males Females<br />
    13. 13. Awareness of social grants<br />Males Females<br />
    14. 14. Very or somewhat confident know how to use a condom correctly<br />Males * Females<br />
    15. 15. Have drugs or alcohol affected your sexual decisionmaking in the last 12 months?<br />Males * Females<br />
    16. 16. Partner reduction-mean # in last year<br />Males Females<br />
    17. 17. Summary<br />Females feel more powerful<br />More awareness of social grants<br />More confidence in condom use<br />Sexual behavior less influenced by drugs/alcohol<br />Partner reduction among males<br />
    18. 18. “It’s different, in school we learn mathematics and biology but here we learn things that we can use in the future.”<br /> - female age 16 <br />
    19. 19. Participant views <br />“….. I didn’t understand about HIV and AIDS before <br />but now I do. I didn’t learn that in school.” <br />–female age 20 years<br />“It changed my attitude, because I know how to use a condom and I know how to trust my partner and I know how to advise my partner, when we are sitting together and talking about, how to have sexual intercourse and I know even to advise the community as a whole about HIV/AIDS…”–male age 22 years<br />
    20. 20. What the learners say about the program<br />It is good for young people like me because it teaches about things that happen in real life. Respecting and honoring the life you have and people around you and know that you have a precious life. <br />I can express my ideas to others. <br />I can plan for the future<br />Steps necessary to pursue my goals<br />To make a plan and stick to it.<br />It made me realize I had a bright future<br />What happens now determines my future<br />I failed this grade but didn’t give up<br />It builds my self-esteem<br />I am confident<br />Isihlanguprlogramme is teaching us a lot. We as young people need to be familiar with what is going on in our lives. It is a very good programme. <br />How important it is to plan for everything you intend to do<br />I have now decided to study and finish school first, rather than planning for family although I have on baby already<br />To be prepared for any challenges or circumstances that may ever come<br />In order to have a brighter future it starts now and plan what you are going to do with your life<br />Knowing everything made me become more assertive<br />I am planning high and also work hard to achieve my goals<br />
    21. 21. Selected resources<br />Hallman, K. 2008a.“Researching the determinants of vulnerability to HIV amongst adolescents,” IDS Bulletin, 39(5), November 2008.<br />Hallman, K. 2008b, in press. “Social exclusion: The gendering of adolescent HIV risks in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa,” in J. Klot and V. Nguyen eds., The Fourth Wave: An Assault on Women - Gender, Culture and HIV in the 21st Century. Social Science Research Council and UNESCO.<br />Hallman, K. 2008c, under review. "Orphanhood Type and Sexual Debut: A panel study from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa," Economic Development and Cultural Change.<br />Bruce, J. and Hallman, K. 2008. “Reaching the girls left behind,” Gender & Development, 16(2): 227-245.<br />Hallman, K. 2007. “Nonconsensual sex, school enrollment and educational outcomes in South Africa,” Africa Insight (special issue on Youth in Africa), 37(3): 454-472.<br />Hallman, K. Genderedsocioeconomic conditions and HIV riskbehavioursamongyoung people in South Africa. 2005. African Journal of AIDS Research 4(1): 37–50.Abstract: http://www.popcouncil.org/projects/abstracts/AJAR_4_1.html<br />
    22. 22. Much more analysis to come<br />Some promising indications already<br />More disaggregation<br />Age, orphan status, household poverty, personal assets, etc.<br />More outcomes<br />Aspirations, financial beliefs and behaviors, gender attitudes, partner violence, empowerment<br />Regressions<br />Round 3?<br />
    23. 23. Thank you!<br />Our funders: DFID via the ABBA RPC<br />& ESRC/Hewlett Joint Scheme<br />

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