Can financial education and social support enhance the effectiveness of an adolescent HIV prevention program? Evidence fro...
Setting<br />Semi-rural KwaZulu Natal<br />Poverty and income inequality<br />Unemployment<br />Early pregnancy<br />Early...
Formative research: vulnerabilities associated with adolescent HIV risk behaviors<br />Living in poverty<br />Not socially...
Poorer more likely to sexually debut earlier<br />Ever had sex:  14-16 year-olds<br />Poor<br />Non-poor<br />Source: Hall...
Those with less social capital <br />more likely to experience forced sex<br />Ever forced sex:14-16 year-old females<br /...
Orphans have more <br />economically-motivated sexual encounters<br />Ever traded sex:  sexually debuted 14-16-year-olds<b...
Possible protective factors<br />Education<br />Access to financial services and social grants<br />Social support<br />
Purpose<br />Improve functional capabilities and well-being of adolescents at high risk for:<br />	HIV and STIs		teenage p...
Program Methods<br /> Intervention<br />Evidence-based<br />Piloted<br />Multi-sectoral<br />Participatory<br />Intensive ...
Randomization<br />HIV, RH, Life Skills<br />HIV, RH, Life Skills + financial capabilities<br />Delayed intervention<br />
Research Methods<br />Longitudinal survey <br />Youth-conducted social mapping with presentations back to community<br />Y...
Description of sample<br />Age<br />Household size<br />Orphaning<br />Sex<br />Pregnancy<br />Economic status<br />Assets...
How powerful do you feel?<br />Males	*			Females*<br />
Awareness of social grants<br />Males	*			Females*<br />
Know can get pregnant if you have sex only once<br />Males				females*<br />
Very or somewhat confident know how to use a condom correctly<br />Males	*			Females*<br />
Have drugs or alcohol affected your sexual decisionmaking in the last 12 months?<br />Males	*			Females<br />
Talk to partner about avoiding or delaying sex<br />Males				Females<br />
Partner reduction-mean # in last year<br />Males				Females<br />
Partner reduction--% reduced to 1 or 0<br />Males				females<br />
This is only the beginning—much more analysis to come<br />More disaggregation<br />Age, orphan status, household poverty,...
“It’s different, in school we learn mathematics and biology but here we learn things that we can use in the future.”<br />...
Participant views <br />“….. I didn’t understand about HIV and AIDS before <br />but now I do. I didn’t learn that in scho...
Selected resources<br />Hallman, K.  2008a.“Researching the determinants of vulnerability to HIV amongst adolescents,” IDS...
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Can financial education and social support enhance the effectiveness of an adolescent HIV prevention program? Evidence from the Siyakha Nentsha program in KwaZulu-Natal

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Can financial education and social support enhance the effectiveness of an adolescent HIV prevention program? Evidence from the Siyakha Nentsha program in KwaZulu-Natal

  1. 1. Can financial education and social support enhance the effectiveness of an adolescent HIV prevention program? Evidence from the Siyakha Nentsha program in KwaZulu-Natal<br />Kelly Hallman, Eva Roca, Kasthuri Govender, Emmanuel Mbatha, <br />Rob Pattman, DeeviaBhana, Mike Rogan, and Hannah Taboada <br />Economic Empowerment and HIV meeting<br />Washington, DC April 22, 2010<br />
  2. 2. Setting<br />Semi-rural KwaZulu Natal<br />Poverty and income inequality<br />Unemployment<br />Early pregnancy<br />Early school leaving<br />HIV<br />
  3. 3. Formative research: vulnerabilities associated with adolescent HIV risk behaviors<br />Living in poverty<br />Not socially connected<br />Orphaned<br />Source: Hallman 2004, 2005, 2008a, 2008b, 2008c<br />
  4. 4. Poorer more likely to sexually debut earlier<br />Ever had sex: 14-16 year-olds<br />Poor<br />Non-poor<br />Source: Hallman 2005, 2008a<br />
  5. 5. Those with less social capital <br />more likely to experience forced sex<br />Ever forced sex:14-16 year-old females<br />Source: Hallman 2008a, 2008b<br />
  6. 6. Orphans have more <br />economically-motivated sexual encounters<br />Ever traded sex: sexually debuted 14-16-year-olds<br />Source: Hallman 2008a, 2008c<br />
  7. 7. Possible protective factors<br />Education<br />Access to financial services and social grants<br />Social support<br />
  8. 8. Purpose<br />Improve functional capabilities and well-being of adolescents at high risk for:<br /> HIV and STIs teenage pregnancy parenthood<br /> school dropout loss of one or both parents<br /> lack of knowledge of further employment and training opportunities<br />
  9. 9. Program Methods<br /> Intervention<br />Evidence-based<br />Piloted<br />Multi-sectoral<br />Participatory<br />Intensive – multi-session<br />
  10. 10. Randomization<br />HIV, RH, Life Skills<br />HIV, RH, Life Skills + financial capabilities<br />Delayed intervention<br />
  11. 11. Research Methods<br />Longitudinal survey <br />Youth-conducted social mapping with presentations back to community<br />Youth, parent, mentor focus groups to assess experience with intervention<br />
  12. 12.
  13. 13. Description of sample<br />Age<br />Household size<br />Orphaning<br />Sex<br />Pregnancy<br />Economic status<br />Assets—household and personal<br />Friendship networks<br />Participation<br />
  14. 14. How powerful do you feel?<br />Males * Females*<br />
  15. 15. Awareness of social grants<br />Males * Females*<br />
  16. 16. Know can get pregnant if you have sex only once<br />Males females*<br />
  17. 17. Very or somewhat confident know how to use a condom correctly<br />Males * Females*<br />
  18. 18. Have drugs or alcohol affected your sexual decisionmaking in the last 12 months?<br />Males * Females<br />
  19. 19. Talk to partner about avoiding or delaying sex<br />Males Females<br />
  20. 20. Partner reduction-mean # in last year<br />Males Females<br />
  21. 21. Partner reduction--% reduced to 1 or 0<br />Males females<br />
  22. 22. This is only the beginning—much more analysis to come<br />More disaggregation<br />Age, orphan status, household poverty, personal assets, etc.<br />More outcomes<br />Gender attitudes, beliefs about partner violence, aspirations and how to achieve, financial beliefs and behaviors, more on empowerment<br />Regressions<br />Round 3?<br />
  23. 23. “It’s different, in school we learn mathematics and biology but here we learn things that we can use in the future.”<br /> - female age 16 <br />
  24. 24. Participant views <br />“….. I didn’t understand about HIV and AIDS before <br />but now I do. I didn’t learn that in school.” <br />–female age 20 years<br />“It changed my attitude, because I know how to use a condom and I know how to trust my partner and I know how to advise my partner, when we are sitting together and talking about, how to have sexual intercourse and I know even to advise the community as a whole about HIV/AIDS…”–male age 22 years<br />
  25. 25. Selected resources<br />Hallman, K. 2008a.“Researching the determinants of vulnerability to HIV amongst adolescents,” IDS Bulletin, 39(5), November 2008.<br />Hallman, K. 2008b, in press. “Social exclusion: The gendering of adolescent HIV risks in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa,” in J. Klot and V. Nguyen eds., The Fourth Wave: An Assault on Women - Gender, Culture and HIV in the 21st Century. Social Science Research Council and UNESCO.<br />Hallman, K. 2008c, under review. "Orphanhood Type and Sexual Debut: A panel study from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa," Economic Development and Cultural Change.<br />Bruce, J. and Hallman, K. 2008. “Reaching the girls left behind,” Gender & Development, 16(2): 227-245.<br />Hallman, K. 2007. “Nonconsensual sex, school enrollment and educational outcomes in South Africa,” Africa Insight (special issue on Youth in Africa), 37(3): 454-472.<br />Hallman, K. Genderedsocioeconomic conditions and HIV riskbehavioursamongyoung people in South Africa. 2005. African Journal of AIDS Research 4(1): 37–50.Abstract: http://www.popcouncil.org/projects/abstracts/AJAR_4_1.html<br />
  26. 26. Thank you!<br />Our funders: ESRC/Hewlett Joint Scheme<br />& DFID via the ABBA RPC<br />

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