Aafp fmcc-media-relations-booklet-2012
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Aafp fmcc-media-relations-booklet-2012 Aafp fmcc-media-relations-booklet-2012 Document Transcript

  • Media Relations ResourcesFamily Medicine Congressional Conference May 14-15, 2012 Leslie Champlin, Senior Public Relations Strategist lchampli@aafp.org 800-274-2237, x5224 Amanda Holt, Public Relations Strategist aholt@aafp.org 800-274-2237, x5223
  • Table of ContentsAAFP’s Online Media Center…………………………………………………………….. 3Public Speaking Organization …………………………………………………………….. 4Messaging Worksheet …………………………………………………………………… 5Making Your Positive Points Worksheet …………………………………………………. 6Building Powerful Answers ……………………………………………………………..... 7Tips to Ensure Your Message Gets Across ……………………………………………….. 8Bridging Language ………………………………………………………………………... 11Answering Difficult Questions Worksheet ……………………………………………….. 12Power Words ……………………………………………………………………………… 13Print Interview Tips ………………………………………………………………………. 14Radio Interview Tips ……………………………………………………………………… 15Television Interview Tips ………………………………………………………………… 16Follow-up Tips ……………………………………………………………………………. 18Notes Page ……………………………………………………………………………….. 19 2
  • AAFP’s Online Media Center - www.aafp.org/mediaAAFP Public Relations provides information that is timely, accurate, and reliable – whetherits background information, an interview with a family physician on a clinical topic, orcomments on AAFP policy.The links on the left connect you to key AAFP media resources: • News releases and statements; • Media kits; • Information about the AAFP and the specialty of family medicine; • Bios and headshots of AAFP leaders; • Special search function for AAFP policies and articles in AAFP publications; • Contact us – direct contact information for each person on the AAFP PR staff; • Charts and graphs that visually convey facts about the specialty; • Multi-media resources – videos highlighting family medicine, b-roll footage ready for broadcast, high resolution photographs, etc. 3
  • Basic Public Speaking OrganizationExcellence“…The thread that runs through every form of excellence is this. Above all else, excellencerequires that we submit ourselves to a high standard of performance and strive to achieve it.”John Gardner(Author, Cabinet Member)Founder of Common Cause The Monroe Motivated SequenceStep One: Gain Attention □ Quotation-Statistic-Anecdote-Startling statement □ Reference to problem □ Reference to audienceStep Two: Establish Need □ Offer a clear, concise statement of need - (Use illustrations and/or specific instances to give audience an idea of the nature and scope of the problem or idea.) □ This is the central idea. (Use supporting materials, stats, testimony to drive point home.) □ Tell them what you are going to tell them □ Establish expectation. (Point out how the issue or problem affects the audience’s health, security, etc.)Step Three: Satisfy the Need □ You provide satisfaction when you clearly present the information and your purpose for taking their time. “Wow, I’m glad I came. I didn’t know that before.” □ Initial Summary: State in advance what your main points are. □ Discuss in order the information for each of the main points. □ Final Summary: Tell them what you said.Step Four: Visualize the Need Satisfied □ Primary strategy in persuasive speech is to project your audience into the future and accepting or denying your proposals. □ In informative speeches this step may be sued to suggest the pleasure that may be gained from this knowledge.Step Five: Ask for Action □ Describe the expected results of action □ Describe the consequences of inaction. □ Urge further study, make contributions, actually do something about your speech. □ Have a clear, specific action to take. Just “do something” only frustrates. 4
  • MessagingSelect three essential messages for your interview. With complicated information, there are manymessages and points to share. By crystallizing your argument into a few key messages withsupporting evidence, your main point will be clearly understood and not lost in an overwhelmingamount of information, numbers and background. Message OutlineMessageOne sentenceTalking Point 1Supporting evidence, anecdoteRelate back to messageTalking Point 2Supporting evidence, anecdoteRelate back to messageTalking Point 3Supporting evidence, anecdoteRelate back to message 5
  • Making Your Positive PointsYour goal for every interview is to convey your positive points across to the audience. As part ofyour pre-interview preparation, list the positive points you plan to discuss. Positive Points 1. ________________________________________________________________ 2. ________________________________________________________________ 3. ________________________________________________________________ 4. ________________________________________________________________ 5. ________________________________________________________________ 6
  • Building Powerful AnswersA reporter’s job is to tell a story. Move into “story mode” during your interviews to make it easyfor reporters to turn your message into a story.How We Think • Data • Economics • Factoids • ReportsHow Reporters Think • Educate the Public • Conflict • Facts/context • Damage • Problems/SolutionsAttributes of Good Answers • About people • Benefits versus features • Communications objectives • Credibility • Empathy • Meaningful specificity • Memorable • No negative words • Non-technical • Packaged and bundled • Power words • Pyramid-like structure • Story-like construction 7
  • Tips to Ensure Your Message Gets AcrossSpeak in Sound BitesMake your messages concise. Try to keep your thoughts and statements to 8-12 seconds fortelevision, 6-12 seconds for radio, and 25-35 seconds for print interviews. Think of sound biteslike word pictures that tell your story in seconds. Use short, pithy statements to summarize yourpoint of view.Why use sound bites? In the case of broadcast, your interview comments will be cut apart in theediting suite after your interview, and only portions of your answers will be selected for use. Forprint interviews, using sound bites assists journalists in their efforts to translate (accurately) whatyou said into the printed word.FlagsUse flags to let reporters know when you’re about to hit a key point.Flag examples include: • The key thing is … • The best part about … • The most exciting element is … • What’s most important is … • Another thing to remember is …BridgesUse bridges to help you quickly get back to the message you want to share. Bridges also providedirection for the reporter and drive your message.Examples: • Let me put this in perspective … • What’s important to remember … • What this means is … • The real question is … • That’s only a small part of the picture … • I think the point you’re trying to get at is … • That may be, but family physicians care about … • That may be true, but today I’m here to talk about … • Family physicians believe that … • I don’t know, but what I do know is … 8
  • Localize and PersonalizeLocalize and personalize to help ensure your messages resonate with your audience.Personalize and HumanizeFind ways to personalize and humanize your information. Explain how the issue affects theviewer or reader. Use a lively anecdote or personal story to bring an issue to life. Invoke emotionand feeling to reach your audience in a more personal way.Instead of saying simply, “We help people,” say “We help people like the family of four that hadso little money, they were forced to eat canned spaghetti for their three meals everyday. In orderto make sure the children and the parents had more balanced and healthy meals, we providedenough money to help them buy vegetables, meats, fruits and other items to improve their meals… and their health.”Translate with AnalogiesAnalogies are also very useful in reaching the audience in a way they will understand. When abuilder says, “This will be 47,000 square feet,” few of us know how big that really is. But if thatsame builder would say, “This would be 47,000 square feet, which is about the size of a footballfield,” we know exactly what the builder means. Help your audience grasp the concept. Offer amental picture to help make complicated concepts simple.Example:Electronic health records will constitute the central nervous system of the New Model medicaloffice.LocalizeKnow your audience and try to make your issue relevant to the community where the story willappear. If you have facts, figures or statistics about the local market, use them in the interview tohelp make the story meaningful. People want to know how this will affect them and theircommunity.Example: • Good: According to a survey by the American Academy of Family Physicians, one in four doctors in the country will stop accepting new Medicare patients if nothing is done. • Better: According to a survey by the American Academy of Family Physicians, one in four doctors in California will stop accepting new Medicare patients if nothing is done. • Best: Dr. Jones, a family physician in Los Angeles, Calif., is just one of the many doctors who will no longer be able to accept new Medicare patients. According to a survey by the American Academy of Family Physicians, one in four doctors in California will stop accepting new Medicare patients if nothing is done. 9
  • Simplify Your LanguageJargonJargon should be avoided at all costs. It is verbal shorthand and usually only people with yourexpertise will understand it. Assume the interviewer and his/her audience does not understandyour technical language. Jargon is a sure fire way to crush a “wow” potential.Examples of medical jargon: • adverse event – side effect • contusion – bruise • ambulatory care setting – doctor’s office • myocardial infarction – heart attack • pulmonary embolism – clot in the lungs • benign – not cancerous • utilize – useAcronymsAlso be sure to avoid acronyms. While some are very familiar to people, others are moreconfusing. Saying the name in full often means more. Even though we know what CDC standsfor, saying “Centers for Disease Control and Prevention” helps send more of a message of whatthe agency is all about.PercentagesAvoid percentages when possible. There are three reasons a person should not use them. Take“80 percent” as an example. It is better to say “about four of every five.” Percentages areconfusing to some people and by saying “four of five,” you do the conversion for them. Further,since people think in pictures, saying “four out of five doctors would choose this treatment,” ismore effective. It puts a picture in our head that we can relate to. Finally, it is more personal.Instead of talking about people or objects as statistics, this approach personalizes a statement. 10
  • Bridging Language1. … But the facts are…2. … Here’s another way to say it…3. … From my perspective…4. … Here’s an even tougher question…5. … I have heard that too, but the real focus should be…6. … I would describe it differently…7. … If I may, let me pick a more important point…8. … Looking ahead…9. … Let’s deal in reality…10. … Let’s talk about something I’m even more familiar with…11. … Let’s use another perspective…12. … Opinions can differ, but I believe…13. … Our goal is…14. … That’s one view, mine is…15. … The critical issue is…16. … The question should be…17. …What concerns me even more…18. … What’s even more important is…19. … Yes, but… 11
  • Answering Difficult QuestionsOnce you have listed questions you find difficult to answer, the next step is to determine exactlyhow you will answer them. Remember, after you acknowledge (not repeat) any negativequestions, you should be prepared to bridge to your positive points.Difficult Question________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________My Answer________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Bridge____________________________________________________________Positive Point 1________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Positive Point 2________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Proprietary, Legal, Confidential Questions not to be discussed:________________________________________________________________________ 12
  • Power WordsAggressive NewAttack PowerfulCandid PreventClear PrioritizeCrucial ProtectCritical ProudDefend PurposefulDetect ResponsibleDeter SensibleDifferent SimpleDirect SincereEmphasize StrongEmpathize SurprisedEnergize TenderExciting ToughFascinating TruthfulForceful UniqueImportant UnusualLegitimize UrgentNecessary ValuableNeeded 13
  • Print Interview Tips• When a reporter calls, ask immediately what story he or she is working on. What’s the concept?• If you are asked several questions at once, identify the question you are answering.• Don’t get upset if your quotes don’t appear. Space is limited.• Provide brief answers and speak slowly so the reporter can absorb and understand what you are saying.• Be prepared for a longer interview than was requested.• Try to get relevant facts and statistics beforehand. It will help you and will give the reporter an additional source.• Take time to educate the reporter — he or she probably doesn’t have a medical degree.• Don’t say “no comment” or go “off the record.” Either give a complete answer or say, “I don’t know but I will find out and get right back to you.” 14
  • Radio Interview Tips• Use anecdotes and analogies. Good radio communicators paint “word pictures.”• Be prepared for a small studio and many distractions — ignore them, stay alert, keep your mind on the topic and your eye on the host.• Avoid pauses when answering questions in live radio interview. Silence on the radio suggests confusion. (It’s okay if there’s a pause after your answer; then it’s the host’s responsibility.)• It’s okay to refer to notes, but do not read directly from them if possible. Be careful not to rattle the pages — radio microphones are sensitive.• Remember that all the sincerity and enthusiasm that you are trying to communicate must come through your voice. Smile!• Use the host’s first name occasionally. In a call-in show, use callers’ first names, too. 15
  • Television Interview Tips• Arrive early.• Ask to meet the interviewer and the producer to discuss the line of questioning.• Let them know your general philosophy but don’t give too much away.• Be careful about what you say at all times; microphones are all around, and they may be live.• Relax and ask questions.• Expect to feel a bit nervous.• Check yourself in the mirror just before going on; if makeup is offered, accept it.• Don’t get sidetracked — ignore distractions.• Concentrate on looking at the host or whoever else is talking; don’t look at yourself in a monitor while you’re on the air.• Answer directly with “yes” or “no,” “that’s true” or “that’s not true,” or other appropriate phrases then add additional information.• Humanize yourself — talk about people and patients, not percentages.• Smile when appropriate.• Use first names.• Be informal and conversational; use short words and simple sentences.• If you are interrupted by the host or another guest:  Stop, listen, then pick up with “As I was saying...” and finish with “Now, what was it you just asked (said)?”  Ignore interruption, finish answer, then say, “What was it you just asked?”  Allow interruption and respond to it but only if doing so is to your advantage, such as giving you an opportunity to clarify a point you were making)  Stay cool. 16
  • Television Dos and Don’ts Do • Sit with legs together or crossed at knee (women: don’t cross legs if skirt is short). • Sit up straight and lean slightly forward in chair. • Use moderate (but not too broad) gestures. • Look interested, smile when appropriate. • Hold your head level. • Keep hands folded on lap or arms of chair. Don’t • Fold your arms or make fists. • Fiddle with papers, pen, pencil, clothing, jewelry or hair. • Slouch, rock or swivel in chair. • Be overly casual/gesture wildly. • Frown or smirk.What To Wear Women • Solid, bright colors are best. • Avoid all white, cream or black. • Avoid busy prints. • Avoid shiny materials. • Avoid very shiny or heavy jewelry. • Avoid scarves, unless you are very good with them. • Apply your makeup like you normally do; avoid bright or dark lipsticks and anything frosted. Men • Solid suits in gray or navy. • Solid shirts, avoid bright white. • Avoid ties that are checked, hounds tooth or complicated patterns. • Powder your nose, forehead and/or bald head with a translucent powder to reduce shine. • Shave. Both • Do not wear sunglasses or photosensitive lenses. • If you normally wear glasses, wear them during the interview, but tilt them slightly down to avoid glare. • Wear dark socks. • If seated, make sure socks are long enough to cover your calf when your legs are crossed. • Keep a nice shirt and jacket in your office, just in case. 17
  • Tips for Follow-Up• Offer to check facts (though do not ask to “approve” the piece before publication).• Write a note to the journalist if the article is good• Call the journalist if the article didn’t appear correctly or you were misquoted.• Offer to discuss other topics that may be pertinent to the reporter’s beat.• Send new information on the subject as it becomes available. 18
  • Notes 19