Chapter 9
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Chapter 9

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Chapter 9 Document Transcript

  • 1. Common Export Documents The following documents are commonly used in exporting, but specific requirements vary by destination and product. For assistance with country-specific documentation requirements, please contact the Trade Information Center at 1-800-USA-TRADE. Shipper’s Export Declaration Commercial invoice Certificate of Origin Bill of Lading Temporary Import Certificate / ATA CARNET Insurance certificate Export Packing List Import License Consular Invoice Inspection Certification Dock Receipt and Warehouse Receipt Destination Control Statement Shipper’s Export Declaration The SED is the most common of all export documents. It can be electronically filed using the AESDirect online system. Commercial invoice A bill for the goods from the seller to the buyer. These invoices are often used by governments to determine the true value of goods when assessing customs duties. Governments that use the commercial invoice to control imports will often specify its form, content, number of copies, language to be used, and other characteristics (see Sample). Certificate of Origin The Certificate of Origin is only required by some countries. In many cases, a statement of origin printed on company letterhead will suffice (download generic certificate or see Sample with explanation). Special certificates are needed for countries with which the United States has special trade agreements, such as Mexico, Canada and Israel (see more information on Free Trade Agreements). Bill of Lading A contract between the owner of the goods and the carrier (as with domestic shipments). For vessels, there are two types: a straight bill of lading which is non-negotiable and a negotiable or shipper's order bill of lading. The latter can be bought, sold, or traded while the goods are in transit. The customer usually needs an original as proof of ownership to take possession of the goods (see Sample Short Form Bill of Lading and Sample Liner Bill of Lading). Temporary Import Certificate / ATA CARNET
  • 2. An ATA Carnet (a. k. a. "Merchandise Passport") is a document that facilitates the temporary importation of products into foreign countries by eliminating tariffs and value-added taxes (VAT) or the posting of a security deposit normally required at the time of importation. Insurance certificate Used to assure the consignee that insurance will cover the loss of or damage to the cargo during transit (see Sample). These can be obtained from your freight forwarder. Export Packing List Considerably more detailed and informative than a standard domestic packing list, it itemizes the material in each individual package and indicates the type of package, such as a box, crate, drum, or carton. Both commercial stationers and freight forwarders carry packing list forms. Import License Import licenses are the responsibility of the importer. Including a copy with the rest of your documentation, however, can sometimes help avoid problems with customs in the destination country. Consular Invoice Required in some countries, it describes the shipment of goods and shows information such as the consignor, consignee, and value of the shipment. If required, copies are available from the destination country's Embassy or Consulate in the U.S. Air Way Bills Air freight shipments are handled by air waybills, which can never be made in negotiable form (see Sample). Inspection Certification Required by some purchasers and countries in order to attest to the specifications of the goods shipped. This is usually performed by a third party and often obtained from independent testing organizations. Dock Receipt and Warehouse Receipt Used to transfer accountability when the export item is moved by the domestic carrier to the port of embarkation and left with the ship line for export. ^Top of Page Destination Control Statement Appears on the commercial invoice, and ocean or air waybill of lading to notify the carrier and all foreign parties that the item can be exported only to certain destinations. Introduction An exporter without any commercial contract is completely exposed of foreign exchange risks
  • 3. that arises due to the probability of an adverse change in exchange rates. Therefore, it becomes important for the exporter to gain some knowledge about the foreign exchange rates, quoting of exchange rates and various factors determining the exchange rates. In this section, we have discussed various topics related to foreign exchange rates in detail. Export from India required special document depending upon the type of product and destination to be exported. Export Documents not only gives detail about the product and its destination port but are also used for the purpose of taxation and quality control inspection certification. Shipping Bill / Bill of Export Shipping Bill/ Bill of Export is the main document required by the Customs Authority for allowing shipment. A shipping bill is issued by the shipping agent and represents some kind of certificate for all parties, included ship's owner, seller, buyer and some other parties. For each one represents a kind of certificate document. Documents Required for Post Parcel Customs Clearance In case of Post Parcel, no Shipping Bill is required. The relevant documents are mentioned below: • Customs Declaration Form - It is prescribed by the Universal Postal Union (UPU) and international apex body coordinating activities of national postal administration. It is known by the code number CP2/ CP3 and to be prepared in quadruplicate, signed by the sender. • Despatch Note- It is filled by the exporter to specify the action to be taken by the postal department at the destination in case the address is non-traceable or the parcel is refused to be accepted. • Commercial Invoice - Issued by the exporter for the full realisable amount of goods as per trade term. • Consular Invoice - Mainly needed for the countries like Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Mauritius, New Zealand, Burma, Iraq, Ausatralia, Fiji, Cyprus, Nigeria, Ghana, Zanzibar etc. It is prepared in the prescribed format and is signed/ certified by the counsel of the importing country located in the country of export. • Customs Invoice - Mainly needed for the countries like USA, Canada, etc. It is prepared on a special form being presented by the Customs authorities of the importing country. It facilitates entry of goods in the importing country at preferential tariff rate. • Legalised / Visaed Invoice - This shows the seller's genuineness before the appropriate consulate or chamber or commerce/ embassy. • Certified Invoice - It is required when the exporter needs to certify on the invoice that the goods are of a particular origin or manufactured/ packed at a particular place and in accordance with specific contract. Sight Draft and Usance Draft are available for this. Sight Draft is required when the exporter expects immediate payment and Usance Draft is required for credit delivery. • Packing List - It shows the details of goods contained in each parcel / shipment. • Certificate of Inspection – It is a type of document describing the condition of goods and confirming that they have been inspected.
  • 4. • Black List Certificate - It is required for countries which have strained political relation. It certifies that the ship or the aircraft carrying the goods has not touched those country(s). • Manufacturer's Certificate - It is required in addition to the Certificate of Origin for few countries to show that the goods shipped have actually been manufactured and is available. • Certificate of Chemical Analysis - It is required to ensure the quality and grade of certain items such as metallic ores, pigments, etc. • Certificate of Shipment - It signifies that a certain lot of goods have been shipped. • Health/ Veterinary/ Sanitary Certification - Required for export of foodstuffs, marine products, hides, livestock etc. • Certificate of Conditioning - It is issued by the competent office to certify compliance of humidity factor, dry weight, etc. • Antiquity Measurement – It is issued by Archaeological Survey of India in case of antiques. • Shipping Order - Issued by the Shipping (Conference) Line which intimates the exporter about the reservation of space of shipment of cargo through the specific vessel from a specified port and on a specified date. • Cart/ Lorry Ticket - It is prepared for admittance of the cargo through the port gate and includes the shipper's name, cart/ lorry No., marks on packages, quantity, etc. • Shut Out Advice - It is a statement of packages which are shut out by a ship and is prepared by the concerned shed and is sent to the exporter. • Short Shipment Form - It is an application to the customs authorities at port which advises short shipment of goods and required for claiming the return.