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Power point 2003 design principles v2009
 

Power point 2003 design principles v2009

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  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide This PowerPoint presentation introduced the principles students must learn to complete the assigned PowerPoint 2003 project. The presentation includes some ideas and examples from a presentation by Professor Paul Argenti, The Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth college. Used by permission of Professor Argenti.
  • Briefly review the three DVL competencies related to Office 2003 applications, and the three DVL modules created to give students DVL knowledge and practice using Office 2003 applications. PowerPoint 2007 Design Principles Study Guide
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide This slide outlines the entire presentation. Point out to students that Early in the presentation (here it’s this third slide) the presenter should tell the audience what to expect in the presentation. Sub-bullets give details about a bullet. In a long presentation, it’s a good idea to use this same slide each time you switch to a new topic on the outline.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide When repeating the slide which outlines the presentation, highlight the topic currently under discussion. Point out to students that animation of the arrow is used to draw attention to this point while the presenter talks about it.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide The first topic of discussion is “Structuring Your Message” and this process is broken down into steps. As each step appears, discuss it briefly: Grabber – (optional). Like telling a joke to begin a speech, the grabber should be something that gets the attention of the audience and engages their sympathy toward the message. A grabber should always be relevant to the presentation (not a random joke). Preview – Tell your audience what you plan to present (if the conclusions includes surprises, it’s OK to not include these on the preview slide) Main Points – every slide should be carefully outlined and organized. Review and Closing – Tell you audience what you just told them. Try to engage them in the conclusions.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Just as a joke may be used at the beginning of a speech to make the audience relax and become engaged with the topic, amusing images may be used as “grabbers” at the beginning of a presentation. Be aware of copyright issues. Fair Use allows sharing a comic or other copyrighted image with a small audience, or for review or criticism, but it is not permissible to publish a presentation including copyrighted materials except after getting permission from the author or publisher.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Emphasize to students that writing a clear outline is the first step in creating a strong presentation. Discuss each of the four bullets on this slide as they appear.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide After speaking to the slide, ask students if they find the information easier to understand in this format.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Point out to students that this is NOT a good slide. Tell them that this slide presents the same information outlined on the previous slide, but in a format that’s harder for viewers to understand and remember.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide After you have worked hard to structure your message carefully (by writing an outline that explains your topic), the second step in preparing a presentation is to create an effective visual design. PowerPoint is a visual method of communication. The better the visual design, the better it will convey the message you have carefully written. There are generally-agreed on design principles that we should apply to any visual presentation, including PowerPoint. In the following slides, we will discuss some important design principles.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Among the commonly applied principles of design are the four listed on this slide. If students wish to take additional courses in designing documents (desktop publishing, presentations), these principles will be supplemented by discussions of balance, consistency, unity, use of white (blank) space. For this beginning course in designing PowerPoint presentations, understanding these four principle will provide a good foundation for creating good design. The first design principle we will discuss is contrast.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Ask students to point out examples of each type of contrast (color, scale, value, etc). In the art example shown on the slide. Source: http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/hockney/hockney.nick-wilder.jpg Portrait of Nick Wilder 1966 (100 Kb); Acrylic on canvas, 183 x 183 cm (72 x 72 in); Private collection This image is copyrighted under Creative Commons license and may be reused under share-and-share-alike 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide The ad on the right shows several changes made to the ad on the left. Created contrast by making the “The Show Emporium” and the hours of operation larger than any of the other text. Used only one image, makes it a stronger contrast to the text Non-symmetrical alignment creates contrast between left and right, between text and white space
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide The second design principle we will discuss Repetition. Ask student to recall the name of the second design principle before clicking the mouse to make it appear.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide When the photo of the Chrysler building in New York appears, asks students if they find this to be an attractive building. How does repetition contribute to the beauty of the design? Image: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Chrysler_Building-HP.jpg Source: Flickr by Hey Paul at http://www.flickr.com/photos/heypaul/1758231/ . Permission is granted to use this image under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Generic License at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en .
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide When the “scale” example appears, ask students if they have experimented with the Draw tools in PowerPoint, (or other Office 2003 applications) which were used to make one triangle, which was then duplicated and scaled.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide A third design principle important in PowerPoint is Alignment. Ask student to recall the name of the third design principle before clicking the mouse to make it appear.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Using the same example we talked about earlier, discuss with students what kinds of alignment are used in the examples on the left and the right, and how alignment affects the viewer’s reaction and understanding of a document.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Ask students if they have discovered and experimented with these tools in PowerPoint which can help us achieve careful alignment.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide A fourth design principle we should apply in PowerPoint is Proximity, or grouping. Ask student to recall the name of the fourth design principle before clicking the mouse to make it appear.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Before the final bullet appears, ask students why we would want to be concerned about grouping. What is the purpose of grouping?
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Before clicking the mouse to see the “improved” version of the masthead, ask students if they can suggest which blocks of text should be grouped together.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Ask students to name each of the four design principles before clicking the mouse to reveal them. Summarize: the purpose of these design principles is to achieve balance and unity in the visual field.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Point out that we are now moving on to the next sub-bullet in our outline of the presentation. Remind students that a design theme is typically applied to a presentation. Students have already had experience applying the themes provided by Microsoft, but probably haven’t given much thought to why one choice is better than another for a given presentation, or how they might modify an existing theme to make it more effective for their presentation. Mention that choice of theme is very important. In selecting a theme, keep design principles in mind.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Some themes convey a distinctive mood or impression. The designer should consider carefully if that mood or impression is compatible with the topic of the presentation.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Here is another example of a theme with a strong mood. It’s very topical.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide This theme (template) is from an earlier version of PowerPoint. The bright pink and orange make this inappropriate for any long presentation. Microsoft has wisely made themes in PowerPoint 2003 much more subtle. Don’t use a theme if the images on the background have nothing to do with text content (this would violate text/image synergy usage guideline which we discuss later in this presentation).
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Problems with this slide: Theme chosen is irrelevant to text Using so many different colors for text violates the repetition principle. Using one bullet different than the others violates the repetition principle. Color choices are poor (saturated colors on saturated backgrounds hard to read – inadequate contrast) Script/italic text hard to read on a screen (violates typographic guidelines)
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Sometimes using no theme is the best solution. If a blank white background is used, the viewer can concentrate on the data presented on the slide.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Point out to students the use of sub-bullets. In outlines, it’s preferable to have 2 or more sub-bullets (not just 1) to further explain a bullet point.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Here is an example of a custom theme, which includes a company logo but keeps it small
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Tell students that color selection is an important part of designing (or choosing) a theme.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Emphasize to students the need to test a presentation in advance.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide This slide doesn’t have enough contrast.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide If you don’t want viewers to view any part of the graph as more important than another part, using all these vivid colors may be OK. The purple doesn’t contrast sufficiently with the background.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide If you want to discuss only one section of the chart, it’s better to highlight that section with a spot color which stands out from the other sections.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Since all three bars in the chart are equally colorful, the viewer doesn’t immediately see which bar is the important one (unless it’s the larger one).
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Spot color helps identify what is important.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Next we will discuss selection of fonts, an important part of designing (or selecting) a theme.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide The “repetition” design guideline dictates that we should use the same fonts throughout the presentation. This will emphasize the unity of the message. A different font might be used for emphasis or to point out something that’s different. “ Fancy” fonts, like fancy themes… Can distract from the message Create a mood
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Make sure students understand the difference between serif and sans-serif fonts. Discuss why serif fonts might be easier to read on printed documents, sans-serif easier on electronic formats.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Speak to the slide
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Speak to the slide
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Once we have created the written outline for the presentation and designed or selected a theme (including colors and fonts), we should select images and other visuals with as much care as we applied to the previous structuring the message and designing the presentation.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide PowerPoint allows us to import many kinds of images, audio, and movies. The combination of PowerPoint’s draw tools and animation features give PowerPoint additional visual power that isn’t available on printed documents.
  • This slide and the next slide give students important information about restrictions to using images they find on the Internet and elsewhere. PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide
  • Fair use allows limited use of copyrighted images. PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Crop images so that only the meaningful part of the images is shown. Explain the cropping tool in PowerPoint 2003. Photos by Kay Gaisford, PD
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide It’s easy to find images that will add color and visual interest to a slide, but it’s more difficult to find images that add information. All images used in the presentation should add evidence for the message. Clip art created by Kay Gaisford, PD.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide A chart you create (which provides specific information) should be used in place of a generic clip art chart.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Charts don’t provide good information if they aren’t well-labeled.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Urge students to resist the temptation to use all the texture, gradient, and shadow tools available in PowerPoint 2003.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Often simple is better, less is more.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Tables can convey detailed information that graphs cannot.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide This slide illustrates two ways to use words visually: How they are arranged (Bullets, spacing, color) Use Draw shapes and animation to give words visual power.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide In this example, words have visual meaning Bullets (but no sub-bullets) indicate that each phrase has individual meaning, each line is of equal importance Spacing separates each bullet (add more or less space to indicate grouping or separateness) Adding bright color to some words in a bullet indicates those words have significance.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Animation is a powerful tool in PowerPoint, but avoid the temptation to use it too much, or to use the “exciting” features of animation. Keep animation restrained.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide The points on this slide describe ways that animation is useful in a presentation
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Ask students to react. Do they agree or disagree that “exciting/moving” animations may be annoying?
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Having animation that reacts with the mouse click allows a presenter to spend as much time as desired on a particular topic. This helps to pace the presentation.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide After this slide appears (in which some of the bubbles are reduced in brightness), ask students to look at the finished chart and tell you what the chart is showing: Which bubbled topics seem to have the greatest “impact on adoption”? At what point in the cycleof product launch will these impacts be felt?
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide This slide presents the design principles in visual form. Ask students to name the design principles before you click to make them appear.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Ask students to name some benefits of practicing a presentation.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Go over the points of the slide as they appear.
  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Principles Study Guide Summarize the presentation. Each of these steps is important to success.

Power point 2003 design principles v2009 Power point 2003 design principles v2009 Presentation Transcript

  • PowerPoint 2003 Design Your Assignment is to…
    • Create a Visual Communication
      • Design a specific message directed to a specific audience
      • Structure your message to persuade the listeners to your viewpoint
    • Follow rules of graphic design
    DVL = Digital Visual Literacy Note : This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Grant No. 0501965. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF).
  • DVL is the ability to
    • Critically evaluate digital visual materials (2D and 3D, static and moving)
    • Make decisions using digital-visual representations of data and ideas
      • Excel – Making Decisions with Charts
    • Use computers to create effective visual communications
      • Word – Applying Design Principles to Word documents
      • PowerPoint – Effective Visual Display of Information using PowerPoint.
  • Designing and Presenting PowerPoint
    • Structure your message
    • Design your presentation
      • Follow design principles
      • Select or design a Theme
      • Choose your colors
      • Choose your fonts
    • Select images/visuals
    • Use animation sparingly
    • Practice your presentation
    Example of a “Preview” slide showing main ideas of the presentation
  • Designing and Presenting PowerPoint
    • Structure your message
    • Design your presentation
      • Follow design principles
      • Select or design a Theme
      • Choose your colors
      • Choose your fonts
    • Select images/visuals
    • Use animation sparingly
    • Practice your presentation
    Current topic is highlighted in contrasting color
  • Structuring Your Message Optional Slide Preview Main points Closing Grabber Main “take-aways” (identical or similar to closing slide) One or more slides for each main point Connections (repeated agenda or trackers) Main “take-aways”
      • Only use a Grabber slide if it adds value to the presentation
      • Examples
        • Something humorous
          • A joke
          • A comic or cartoon
        • Intriguing or surprising fact(s) about the topic
      • Be Aware of Copyright Rules
        • Fair Use allows sharing a comic or other copyrighted image with a small audience, or for review or criticism
        • To publish, permission from the author or creator is necessary
    “ Grabber” Slide to Capture the Audience
  • Structure Your Message
    • Outline your presentation, point-by-point
    • Careful choice of words, key ideas only
      • Complete sentences not necessary
      • Bullets need not end with a period
    • 7-7 rule (described on next slide)
    • Sub-bullets give details about bullet points
  • Remember the 7 x 7 Rule
    • Maximum of seven lines, seven words per line
    • If you have more than two lines of text per bullet…
      • simplify the wording
      • or create a main heading plus sub-points
    • Don’t break this guideline very often
  • Example of What Not to Do
    • As a general rule of thumb, keep in mind the rule proposed by presentation experts—a maximum of seven lines per word chart and an average of seven words per line. If you have more than two lines of text in a bullet, either simplify the wording or break it into a main heading plus sub-points. Obviously, it may be necessary to break this guideline sometimes, but don’t do it so often you turn your presentation into a group reading session!
    Too many words on this slide! Not a good visual presentation
  • Designing and Presenting PowerPoint
    • Structure your message
    • Design your presentation
      • Follow design principles
      • Select or design a Theme
      • Choose your colors
      • Choose your fonts
    • Select images/visuals
    • Use animation sparingly
    • Practice your presentation
    Current topic is highlighted in contrasting color
  • Design Principles
    • Use:
    • C ontrast
    • R epetition
    • A lignment
    • P roximity 
  • Contrast
    • Elements to contrast
      • Colors
      • Scale (large/small)
      • Value (light/dark)
      • Line thickness
      • Shapes
      • Spaces
      • Type (size, ornate vs. simple)
    • For a good example of the use of contrast, see:
    • http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/hockney/hockney.nick-wilder.jpg
    Contrast is the use of differences to create interest, excitement.
  • Contrast What CONTRASTS are strong in the second version of the ad?
    • Generates more visual excitement
    • Cues the eye: look at first larger items first, perhaps remember them better.
    What are some benefits of greater CONTRAST?
  • Design Principles
    • C ontrast
    • R epetition
    • A lignment
    • P roximity 
  • Repetition
    • Repetition creates consistency
    • Elements to repeat
      • Shapes
      • Patterns
      • Textures
      • Colors
      • Fonts
    Use the same or similar design elements If you don’t repeat font and colors…. It May look like a ransom note .
  • Repetition
    • The computer makes it easy to repeat elements
    • Use Cut & Paste
    • Transformations such as scaling, rotating, flipping, etc.
    These transformations were done in PowerPoint scale rotation color gradient
  • Design Principles
    • C ontrast
    • R epetition
    • A lignment
    • P roximity 
  • Alignment
    • How does alignment differ in these ads?
    • Assymetrical alignment may generate more visual excitement
    • Creates more white space in one area, a more modern look (traditional design is more balanced)
    Positioning design elements (right, left, center, random)
  • Alignment
    • Tools for alignment exist in all software that handles graphics or text
    • Use Alignment and Distribute tools to arrange objects within groups and to arrange groups on the slide
    Options in PowerPoint 3 objects carelessly placed 3 objects carefully aligned using tools shown above
  • Design Principles
    • C ontrast
    • R epetition
    • A lignment
    • P roximity  
    • What goes with what?
    • Goal is to group visual items that have related functions or meanings
    Proximity A container (box) creates a group Proximity creates groups Space separates groups Grouping, what elements are placed together
    • Identify grouping problems in this masthead:
    Proximity Grouping, what elements are placed together
    • Things that below together should be next to each other – otherwise, they are difficult to understand.
    Tips from….the kitchen (needs to be grouped together)
  • Summary of Design Principles
    • C ontrast
    • R epetition
    • A lignment
    • P roximity 
    Results: B alance U nity Use the four design principles:
  • Designing and Presenting PowerPoint
    • Structure your message
    • Design your presentation
      • Follow design principles
      • Select or design a theme
      • Choose your colors
      • Choose your fonts
    • Select images/visuals
    • Use animation sparingly
    • Practice your presentation
    Current topic is highlighted in contrasting color
  • Fiesta Theme
    • Would you take this presentation seriously?
    • Do you want your audience to take you seriously?
  • This is a Tropical Theme. Does this remind you of Jimmy Buffett or what?
  • This Theme is Very Busy!
    • It might be OK for a presentation on time management
    • For most topics, it would distract from the message.
    • The graphics take up a lot of space
  • Theme with User Modifications
    • The user hasn’t “improved” the theme by changing font colors and font styles.
    • This Font is interesting, but very difficult to read, especially on a slide.
    • A theme should complement the topic of the presentation
      • This theme would be good for hiking or mountain sports
      • Bad for most other topics.
  • Busy theme (left) may not leave room for the information Plain themes (right) don’t distract from the information
  • Design Your Own Theme
    • Some of PowerPoint’s built-in themes are frequently used, frequently seen—do they become boring?
    • Graphics on built-in theme may distract from message
      • Modify a built-in theme to remove distractions
      • Can modify colors and fonts too
  • Design Your Own Theme Acme Financial Corporate identity (small) built into design theme
    • Designing your own theme is quite easy
    • You can select the colors that best represent your topic (or company)
    • You can add a small graphic to the theme.
        • Examples:
            • Company logo in corner or on bottom edge
            • A small graphic representing theme of the presentation
        • Keep it small
  • Designing and Presenting PowerPoint
    • Structure your message
    • Design your presentation
      • Follow design principles
      • Select or design a Theme
      • Choose your colors
      • Choose your fonts
    • Select images/visuals
    • Use animation sparingly
    • Practice your presentation
    Current topic is highlighted in contrasting color
  • Design Your Own Theme
    • Use a cool color, like bright or dark blue, for the background.
    • Use light colors, like pale blue, white or yellow , for the foreground (fonts, graphics).
    • Test your design theme in the setting in which your presentation will be given
      • A light background may work better in a room with a lot of ambient light.
      • Some colors may tire the eyes in different light conditions.
  • Poor Color Choices Slides
    • • Light colored text on a light background is difficult to read.
    • • Make sure the two colors contrast sharply on the large screen, not just on your computer screen.
  • Avoid the “Fruit Salad Effect” North East South Central West Which color should we look at????
  • Use “Spot Color” Instead North East South Central West Spot color emphasizes what you want emphasized.
  • Model 5689 Model 5690 Model 5691 Model 5690 Was Introduced Last Year Which bar do you want the audience to notice?
  • Model 5689 Model 5690 Model 5691 Model 5690 Was Introduced Last Year Spot color directs audience eyes where you desire.
  • Designing and Presenting PowerPoint
    • Structure your message
    • Design your presentation
      • Follow design principles
      • Select or design a Theme
      • Choose your colors
      • Choose your fonts
    • Select images/visuals
    • Use animation sparingly
    • Practice your presentation
    Current topic is highlighted in contrasting color
  • Limit Number of Fonts
    • Usually limit to 2 fonts in a presentation
    • Fonts convey a message or mood
    Font Varieties Examples of Moods
    • Serif vs. Sans Serif (little feet)
      • Serif – has little feet to stand on
      • Sans-Serif – has no feet to stand on
    • Font choices – with or without serifs
      • Serif font is easier to read for printed documents. (Times New Roman)
      • Sans serif font is easier to read on electronic documents and slides (Arial, Verdana)
    • Size
      • Use 18-24 point for text.
      • Use 32  for titles.
    Font Selection H h H h
  • Fonts Styles for Emphasis and Contrast
    • Use bold, underline , and italic sparingly (for emphasis)
    • Avoid Letter junk
      • AVOID BOLD PLUS UNDERLINING PLUS ALL CAPITALS!
      • This looks like a ransom note.
  • THIS IS ALL PRINTED IN UPPER CASE. THE LACK OF SIZE VARIATION WITH ALL CAPITAL LETTERS MAKES IT HARD TO READ FOR EXTENDED TEXT. This Is Title Case. Use Title Case For Your Presentation Title And Perhaps Slide Titles. This is sentence case. Only the first word is capitalized. Use sentence case for bullet points. Font Styles: Case (Capitalization)
  • Designing and Presenting PowerPoint
    • Structure your message
    • Design your presentation
      • Follow design principles
      • Select or design a Theme
      • Choose your colors
      • Choose your fonts
    • Select images/visuals
    • Use animation sparingly
    • Practice your presentation
    Current topic is highlighted in contrasting color
  • We Remember Images Better Than We Remember Text
    • Images of many kinds can be effective
      • Photographs
      • Charts and Graphs
      • Tables, diagrams
      • Movies
    • Words can be turned into images
      • Insert “shapes” that represent words
      • Animate the shapes to show relationships or sequence between words
  • Avoid Using Copyrighted Images
    • Images found on the Internet are usually copyrighted.
      • Unless marked “Public Domain”
    • © Symbol isn’t required
      • Any image or photo is copyrighted by default
    • How to find images not copyright protected?
      • Create your own images or charts
      • Look for images in the public domain
  • “ Fair Use” of Copyrighted Images Fair Use of copyrighted creations usually includes:
    • Quotation of excerpts
      • Film clips, show art, website art
      • In a review or criticism
    • Use in a parody
    • Educational Use
      • A teacher or student used a small part of a work
      • To Illustrate a lesson
  • Graphics Should Be Visual Evidence For Your Message
    • Delete meaningless graphics
      • Why remember something meaningless?
    • Crop photos and images
      • Focus on what’s important
      • Remove the rest
    Original photo Rotated and Cropped photo
  • Graphics Should Be Visual Evidence For Your Message
    • Read your text – what will add evidence?
      • Graphic should contain information (do most clip art images do this?)
    This clip art communicates that there is an upward trend, but a chart created by the user could convey detailed information.
  • Graphics Should Be Visual Evidence For Your Message
    • Read your text – what will add evidence?
      • Graphic should contain information (do most clip art images do this?)
      • Replace a meaningless clip art image with a graph you create
  • When Using Charts, Label Carefully You can paste charts made in Excel. Add titles, labels What are these charts telling us????? Labels are needed!
  • Model C Model K Model Y Avoid “Chart-junk” Like This
    • Use solid colors, not patterns
    • Use fewer (or no) gridlines
    • Use labels instead of legend
    Too many visual effects may distract from the information you want to convey.
  • Model C Model K Model Y Model C is Our Best Seller
    • Uses solid colors, not patterns
    • Use fewer (or no) gridlines
    • Uses labels instead of legend
    This Chart is a Better Design Viewers can concentrate on the information you want to convey, not distracted by “fancy” visual effect.
  • Insert a Table to Make Charts with detailed information. Sample Benefits – Premiums and Benefit Payable at Age 85 This chart is a table, easy to read Age of Applicants Initial Benefit Account Benefit Payable at Age 85 Annual Premium 50/50 $ 374,400 $ 3,364,205 $ 2,730 55/55 $ 374,400 $ 2,635,942 $ 2,886 60/60 $ 374,400 $ 2,065,330 $ 3,588 65/65 $ 374,400 $ 1,618,240 $ 4,836
  • Words Can be Graphic Images
    • Words can be visually displayed
      • Bullets show words in graphic way
      • Colors give words added importance
      • Use draw tools to make graphics from words
    Login Generate Quote(s) Complete all or part of app Print & Sign Forms Submit application 1 2 3 4 5 Processing: How Does it Work? Use shapes containing text to turn words into graphics
  • Who Is Acme Financial?
    • A Leading Insurance Company In The U.S., With An Expanding International Presence
    • Serving More Than 15 Million Customers
    • More Than $100 Billion In Assets
    • Global Operations In 20 Countries
    • More Than 5,000 Employees
    • Extensive And Diversified Distribution Network
    Acme Financial Corporate identity (small) built into design theme Bullets are graphically meaningful – points are separate but equal. Sub-bullets show that some points are subordinate. Text in bullets uses color to emphasize important facts
  • Designing and Presenting PowerPoint
    • Structure your message
    • Design your presentation
      • Follow design principles
      • Select or design a Theme
      • Choose your colors
      • Choose your fonts
    • Select images/visuals
    • Use animation sparingly
    • Practice your presentation
    Current topic is highlighted in contrasting color
  • Animation
    • Can emphasize your points
    • Can also be distracting and annoying, so keep it simple
    • Animate paragraphs (bullet points)
      • Helps pace the presentation (usually slows it down)
      • Forces a step-by-step explanation.
      • Shows audience which point is currently being discussing
  • Animation From Least Annoying to Most Annoying
    • Appearing in place with no effect.
    • Appearing in place with some effect (e.g. dissolve, expand).
    • Initially moving (e.g. flying).
    • Moving for a few seconds, then stopping (e.g. swivel, etc.)
    • Slow entrance, keeps you waiting
    • Continuously moving (for example, this animated “warning” gif)
  • Key metrics drive issue prioritization Impact on adoption Issue Prioritization Strain office resources Reimbursement uncertainty Practice logistics Staff education prevalence - Bubble size Profitability impact Elderly Patients Priority #1 Priority #2 Priority #3 - At launch - 12-24 months - 24+ months Animation Can Demonstrate a Process Being Described By the Presenter Impact on practice performance
  • Impact on adoption Impact on practice performance Issue Prioritization Strain office resources Reimbursement uncertainty Practice logistics Staff education prevalence - Bubble size Profitability impact Elderly Patients Priority #1 Priority #2 Priority #3 - At launch - 12-24 months - 24+ months Key metrics drive issue prioritization Animation Can Demonstrate a Process Being Described By the Presenter
  • Design Principles Contrast Repetition Alignment Proximity Balance Unity Review of Design Principles
  • Designing and Presenting PowerPoint
    • Structure your message
    • Design your presentation
      • Follow design principles
      • Select or design a Theme
      • Choose your colors
      • Choose your fonts
    • Select images/visuals
    • Use animation sparingly
    • Practice your presentation
    Current topic is highlighted in contrasting color
  • Practice for a Successful Delivery Body Voice 1. Posture confident 2. Gestures conversational 3. Facial expressions natural 4. Eye contact throughout 1. Inflection conversational 2. Fillers avoid (um… a…) 3. Enunciation clear
  • Successful PowerPoint Presentations Depends on All of These!
    • Structure your message
    • Design your presentation
      • Follow design principles
      • Select or design a Theme
      • Choose your colors
      • Choose your fonts
    • Select images/visuals
    • Use animation sparingly
    • Practice your presentation