The Ongoing Platform Wars of Today's Classrooms
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

The Ongoing Platform Wars of Today's Classrooms

on

  • 800 views

“Teaching without digital technology

“Teaching without digital technology
is an irresponsible pedagogy.
Why? The future is digital.”

Statistics

Views

Total Views
800
Views on SlideShare
770
Embed Views
30

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
11
Comments
1

1 Embed 30

http://film315s.com 30

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Interesting stats and message! Discusses the evolution of educational technology from the invention of the magic lantern in the 1800s to current technologies. They are all tools that 'should' enhance communication between the student and the teacher. Yet, in many cases, the teachers are missing the opportunity to connect and engage the student. It's not about making teaching easier. Using technology from any era is more about making learning easier for the student! Encourage appropriate, ethical usage of devices, and the students will respond in a mature, trustworthy manner.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    The Ongoing Platform Wars of Today's Classrooms The Ongoing Platform Wars of Today's Classrooms Presentation Transcript

    • The ongoing platform wars
      of today’s classrooms…
      The ongoing platform wars
      of today’s classrooms…
      “Teaching without digital technology
      is an irresponsible pedagogy.
      Why? The future is digital.”
      “Teaching without digital technology
      is an irresponsible pedagogy.
      Why? The future is digital.”
      image: tartanpodcast
    • image: Claremont Colleges Digital Library
      This is not merely a “mac vspc” scenario…
      but rather a “technological vstraditional” scenario.
    • “Traditional” styles of teaching are often considered to be
      “without technology”.
      However, anyinventions ever used in the classroom,
      even “traditional styles”, are forms of technology.
      “Traditional” styles of teaching are often considered to be “without technology”.
      However, anyinventions ever used in the classroom,
      even “traditional styles”, are forms of technology.
      image: aaronharmon
    • …They may not be what we consider to be “technology”,
      because not all are digital inventions or even pieces of machinery.
      But there have still been constant advances in the world of teaching.
      …They may not be what we consider to be “technology”,
      because not all are digital inventions or even pieces of machinery.
      But there have still been constant advances in the world of teaching.
      Books, paper, pen, desks, chalkboards, whiteboards, all of these are technologies.
      Books, paper, pen, desks, chalkboards, whiteboards, all of these are technologies.
      image: morch
    • Evolution of learning tools… aka “technology”:
      Magic lantern - 1870
      Chalkboard - 1890
      Pencil - 1900
      Stereoscope - 1905
      Radio - 1925
      Overhead Projector - 1930
      Language Lab Headset - 1950
      Educational Television - 1958
      Scantron - 1972
      Plato Computer - 1980
      Graphing Calculator - 1985
      Interactive Whiteboard (Smartboard) - 1999
      iPhone - 2007
      iPad - 2010
      Evolution of learning tools… aka “technology”:
      Magic lantern - 1870
      Chalkboard - 1890
      Pencil - 1900
      Stereoscope - 1905
      Radio - 1925
      Overhead Projector - 1930
      Language Lab Headset - 1950
      Educational Television - 1958
      Scantron - 1972
      Plato Computer - 1980
      Graphing Calculator - 1985
      Interactive Whiteboard (Smartboard) - 1999
      iPhone - 2007
      iPad - 2010
      image: tango.mceffrie
    • Interactive Whiteboard (Smartboard) - 1999
      iPhone - 2007
      iPad - 2010
      As you can see, we are moving into an age of interactive technology use within schools.
      As you can see, we are moving into an age of interactive technology use within schools.
      image: smemon
    • Right now, students don’t feel like they are learning in environments that are tech-savvy…
      Only 32% of students said that they believed their college was adequately preparing them to use technology in their careers.
      image: thorinside
    • Even though the students scored their teachers low
      on a “tech-savvy” scale, the teachers thought that
      they themselves were actually quite digitally literate.
      Even though the students scored their teachers low
      on a “tech-savvy” scale, the teachers thought that
      they themselves were actually quite digitally literate.
      Gaps between the faculty and student grades on technology may relate in part to different use patterns of students and faculty members when it comes to technology.
      On every category in the survey, including some that are not particularly cutting edge, student use outpaced faculty use.
      Gaps between the faculty and student grades on technology may relate in part to different use patterns of students and faculty members when it comes to technology.
      On every category in the survey, including some that are not particularly cutting edge, student use outpaced faculty use.
      http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/11/05/survey
      image: chewbacka
    • Therefore, students are
      generally more digitally
      literate because they use
      technology constantly.
      So shouldn’t school systems be looking to move forward and engage with digital natives in ways that interest them?
      image: thorinside
    • Using technology encourages
      Tangential learning:
      students begin to self-educate themselves when they are exposed to content in contexts they already enjoy.
      Digital natives have been immersed in the use of technology since birth; technology use has become a part of their daily lives.
      image: cproppe
    • image: sevenbirches
      Some teachers say that technology distracts students; however, they generally use technology to fill moments of boredom due to poor teaching.
      Some teachers say that technology distracts students; however, they generally use technology to fill moments of boredom due to poor teaching.
       “Class time should be reserved for discussion, especially now that students can download lectures online and find libraries of information on the Web.
      - José A. Bowen, Dean of Southern Methodist University (Dallas, Texas)
       “Class time should be reserved for discussion, especially now that students can download lectures online and find libraries of information on the Web.”
      - José A. Bowen, Dean of Southern Methodist University (Dallas, Texas)
    • image: lisahumes
      Many teachers believe they are using technology to enhance learning; BUT they are actually hiding behind lecture slides,
      notusing technology to engage with the students.
    • “It is clear that the issue is not one related to machines. Instead, it is the lack of skill employed by the professor and the inability to use technology wisely.”
      http://www.openeducation.net/2009/07/31/dean-encourages-professors-to-teach-naked/
      image: patriziasoliani
    • So if some teachers are blaming technology
      for distracting students from their studies…
      Are we to imagine banning books in class?
      “No books, they get in the way of discussion.”
      So if some teachers are blaming technology
      for distracting students from their studies…
      Are we to imagine banning books in class?
      “No books, they get in the way of discussion.”
      Technology has the power to enhance learning in the same way that books, pencils, chalkboards, and calculators have enhanced schooling systems… but even more so.
      image: US Army Africa
    • Students don’t only use their media devices to “distract” themselves.
      Studies show that they are actually using their devices for practical means.
      They are not “just toys”.
      http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Quarterly/EDUCAUSEQuarterlyMagazineVolum/Infographic/225872
    • WHAT KIND OF TECHNOLOGY IS “DYING” IN THE CLASSROOM?
      (and making students feel like they are?)
      POWERPOINT!
      Bad powerpoint interferes with the students’ ability to focus, retain, and learn.
      image: IOE London
    • A study published in the April 2009 issue of British Educational Research Journal found……
      59% of students reported that at least ½ of their lectures were boring
      ….and that PowerPoint was one of the dullest methods they saw.
      These professors are
      “using the program as a crutch rather than as a creative tool”.
      The survey consisted of 211 students at a university in England and was conducted by researchers at the University of Central Lancashire
      image: blogefl
    • This “BOREDOM” is affecting the students’ marks:
      Students who say they are frequently bored are more likely to do poorly on tests, according to studies.
      image: emokr
    • SO WHAT IS WORKING?
      Learning on demand!
      image: bionicteaching
    • image: PVCG
      SO WHAT IS WORKING?
      Learning on demand: “The Power of Podcasts”
      It has been proven that podcasts
      lead to increased student involvement;
      they don’t keep kids from going to class.
      Students do a combination of going to lectures, watching them on tv, and watching them on their iPods.
    • In one review of technology uses in the classroom,
      students accessed the podcasts of one class over 2,200 times:
      Why?
      - some students want to hear particular segments over
      - some didn't take adequate notes at the time
      - some are auditory learners who learn more by listening than reading
      - podcasts can help those with writing disabilities
      - they also help those who speak English is a second language
      image: iMorpheus
    • image: jennaddenda
      "Before, I was always complaining that I never had time to go in-depth and talk with my students. Now they come in actually much more informed about a subject than they would have if they had been assigned a reading.”
      - Maria A. Dixon, assistant professor of applied communication
      at Southern Methodist University (Dallas, Texas)
    • image: English106
      WHAT ELSE IS WORKING?
      Learning on demand.
      The “backchannel” :
      ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA
      “Social media, once kept outside the school door, can entice students who rarely raise a hand to express themselves via a medium they find as natural as breathing.” - Erin Olsen, high school English Teacher (Sioux Rapids, Iowa)
    • If they are texting on-task,
      they are less likely to be texting about something else.
      image: pjguyton2002
    • image: bionicteaching
      Google Moderatorlets a class type questions for the instructor and vote for the ones they would most like answered.
      “You’d think there’s a lot of distraction (by having the class connected online), but it’s actually the opposite. Kids are much quicker at stuff than we are. They can really multitask. They have hypertext minds.”
      - Kate Weber, 4th Grade Teacher (Exira, Iowa)
    • “Everybody is heard in our class.”
      - Leah Postman, 17
      “It’s made me see my peers as more intelligent, see their thought process, and begin to understand them on a deeper level.”
      - Janae Smith, 17
      image: bionicteaching
    • Most students are already active on social media accounts; they have
      pre-existing skills that can be harnessed into the learning world.
      Since courses are available in the same places as their friends, students will be more likely to access these course mediums.
      image: Brandon Christopher Warren
    • “Integrating social media based
      assignments into coursework pushes
      the digital literacy envelope.”
      - Sidney Eve Matrix, Professor at Queen’s University (Kington, ON)
      This is beneficial because of the increase of
      social media’s relevance in the job market.
      image: I Don't Know, Maybe
    • user-generated content = engaging = easier for students to remember = success
      “This creates an overflow effect: encouraging students to spend more time with the course than they would without social media plugins.”
      – Sidney Eve Matrix, Professor at Queen’s University (Kingston, ON)
      image: thorinside
    • Image: faiper
      Benefits of Twitter:
      • has been proven to grow a stronger academic community
      • tweeted events on campus
      • tweeted ideas between students/instructors
      • tweeted tutoring opportunities between students/instructors
      • tweeted schedules
      Benefits of Skype:
      • language classes can use Skype to have face-to-face dialogue with native speakers in their native countries
      • can allow students to have live study sessions online with their peers
      • can allow students to have live chats with instructors
    • image: utnapistim
      But there are fears about
      using social media
      in the classroom.
      “The line between private life and professional life is blurred now because of social media.”
    • In the ongoing "Teachers and Facebook" controversy there have been many cases where teachers' careers have taken hits:
      • 15% experienced cyberbullying in 2009
      • 17% experienced cyberbullying in 2010
      • 28% received unwelcome text messages
      • Teacher Ashley Payne lost her job after posing for pictures with alcohol
      • 3 US teachers were fired in the past 6 months for having inappropriate conversations on facebook
      image: FindYourSearch
    • What can we conclude about these cases?
      These individuals clearly weren’t careful
      with how they conducted themselves online.
      Ashley Payne’s pictures shouldn’t have been
      viewable by people who were not her friends.
      The US teachers who were fired for
      having inappropriate conversations on
      facebookwouldn’t have been fired if
      they weren’t posting inappropriate
      content to begin with.
      If teachers were receiving unwelcome text
      messages, this means that their phone numbers
      were either given out to their students or they
      were listed online… again, this emphasizes
      the need for proper social network privacy settings.
      If teachers are being cyberbullied,
      their students clearly haven’t been taught
      the consequences of it; it is a relatively
      new form of harassment
      image: Nima Badiey
    •  
      The York Region District School Board is embracing the Literacy@School initiative to integrate technology use in the classroom.
      Schools part of this initiative are aware of online codes of conduct that are appropriate for children and adults alike. All schools should adopt similar teachings to ensure that students and teachers are safe online.
      Signs are posted in classrooms urging users to “think before you post”.
      image: nooccar
    • “Sometimes educators are blinded by the fact that these are toys, but for these kids, the novelty is over.”
      “In a traditional classroom, you get the same kids all the time waiting to answer questions. This way I hear from everyone.”
      “It doesn’t replace good teaching. It’s a way to improve it. Students can pursue their interests. It’s passion-based learning.”
      – Royan Lee, 7th Grade teacher at Beverly Acres Public School (Richmond Hill, ON)
      “Sometimes educators are blinded by the fact that these are toys, but for these kids, the novelty is over.”
      “In a traditional classroom, you get the same kids all the time waiting to answer questions. This way I hear from everyone.”
      “It doesn’t replace good teaching. It’s a way to improve it. Students can pursue their interests. It’s passion-based learning.”
      – Royan Lee, 7th Grade teacher at Beverly Acres Public School (Richmond Hill, ON)
      image: familymwr
    • “paperless classroom” =
      potentially bettergrades
      One history department has been “paperless” for 3 years.
      They do essays, tests, and even exams on computers.
      “It’s hyper-efficient…
      and their marks are better
      than when they were tested on paper.”
      – Mark Melnyk, Head of History at Markville Secondary school (Markham, ON)
      This shows how the thinking of this generation of learners differs from those of past years.
      image: David Masters
    • image: alancleaver_2000
      “The old approach to history is well – history. If they ever need to know details such as when Sir John A MacDonald was born, they can grab the answer in seconds. What’s more important to know is why he made the decisions he did.”
      – Mark Melnyk, Head of History at Markville Secondary school (Markham, ON)
    • “The elementary classroom of the 21st century seems to be all about contrast: a blend of old and new, work and play, innocence and sophistication.”
      “When we hand them this piece of technology, there’s immediate engagement.”
      “IPods and iPads are great for this (kindergarten) age because children’s fine motor skills aren’t developed yet. They can focus on writing a letter, not struggling to hold a pencil.”
      – Heather Jelley, Kindergarten Teacher (Keswick, ON)
      image: tartanpodcast
    • Apps help students learn in class and on-the-go:
      Dictionary.com-dictionary and thesaurus
      World Wiki - detailed facts on 200+ countries
      Evernote-notes and web media organizer
      Google Earth - mapping and geography tool
      Units -excellent unit conversion tool
      Voxy-language learning on the go
      Stanza - notes and web media organizer
      iFlashcards - digital flashcards
      Miss Spell’s Class - host own spelling bee
      TED - presentations from award winning speakers
      Math Drills Lite - master basic math skills
      image: TocaBoca
    • While advancements in computer technology are welcome by many students, they can be lifesavers for those with special education needs.
      “If what’s happening in the mainstream classroom can be called a digital deluge, then what’s happening in special education is a tsunami.”
      “If what’s happening in the mainstream classroom can be called a digital deluge, then what’s happening in special education is a tsunami.”
      image: StephEvaPhoto
    • “There is less stigma now that all Grade 9 students are required to use laptops – those who use it for special needs no longer stand out.”
      - Joseph Ravesi, Principal at Sir William Mulock Secondary School (Newmarket, ON)
      image: Bitpicture
    • To educate studentswithout developing their digital literacy is to leave them ill prepared for their futures. You wouldn’t think of educating a student and not teaching them how to read, digital literacy is crucial…
      image: gilest
    • In the future, if you don’t know how to use technology, you will be ‘illiterate’.
      image: gilest
    • References:
      All images were found on Flickr Creative Commons database: http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/
       
      Bowness, Suzanne. "How Technology Is Transforming the Lecture." University Affairs. N.p., 3 Nov. 2008. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://www.universityaffairs.ca/how-technology-is-transforming-the-lecture.aspx>.
       
      Briggs, Linda L. "Students Take to Podcasts." Campus Technology. N.p., 12 June 2005. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://campustechnology.com/articles/2005/12/students-take-to-podcasts.aspx?sc_lang=en>.
       
      "Children's Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998." Children's Online Privacy Protection Act Of 1998. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://www.ftc.gov/ogc/coppa1.htm>.
       
      Coyle, Jim. "McGuinty Tries to Contain a Tempest with a Tweet." TheStar.com. N.p., 17 Sept. 2010. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/862293--coyle-mcguinty-tries-to-contain-a-tempest-with-a-tweet>.
       
      Dskmag. "Infographic: the Tangential Learning Principle." Wordpress. N.p., 23 Mar. 2010. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://deangroom.wordpress.com/2010/03/23/infographic-the-tangential-learning-principle/>.
       
      Gabriel, Trip. "Speaking up in Class, Silently, Using Social Media." The New York Times. N.p., 12 May 2011. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/13/education/13social.html?_r=4&smid=tw-nytimes&seid=auto>.
       
      Guidry, Kevin R. "The Digital Divide and the Participation Gap: Challenges to Innovation." Student Affairs Online. N.p., Summer 2009. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://www.studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Summer_2009/DigitalDivide.html>.
       
      "How Technology Is Transforming the Lecture." Open Education. N.p., 14 May 2011. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://www.openeducation.net/2009/07/31/dean-encourages-professors-to-teach-naked/>.
       
      "Infographic." Educause Quarterly. N.p., 2011. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Quarterly/EDUCAUSEQuarterlyMagazineVolum/Infographic/225872>.
       
      Lavrusik, Vadim. "The Children of Cyberspace: Old Fogies by Their 20s." Mashable. N.p., 19 June 2009. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://mashable.com/2009/06/19/teaching-social-media/>.
       
      Matrix, Sidney Eve. "Do We Have to Teach Naked?" SidneyEveMatrix.com. N.p., 7 Feb. 2010. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://sidneyevematrix.com/do-we-have-to-teach-naked.html/>.
       
      "On What It Would Mean to Really Teach 'Naked'." AcademHack. N.p., 24 July 2009. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://academhack.outsidethetext.com/home/2009/on-what-it-would-mean-to-really-teach-naked/>.
       
      Stone, Brad. "The Children of Cyberspace: Old Fogies by Their 20s." The New York Times. N.p., 9 Jan. 2010. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/10/weekinreview/10stone.html?ref=todayspaper&pagewanted=all>.
       
      "Teachers Warned: Do Not Become Facebook Friends with Your Pupils." Associated Newspapers Ltd. N.p., 25 Apr. 2011. Web. 14 May 2011. <Teachers warned: Do not become Facebook friends with your pupils Read more: http:// www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1380294/Facebook-teachers-warned-Do-friends-pupils.html#ixzz1MlJicd9I>.
       
      "Technology Gap." Inside Higher Ed. N.p., 5 Nov. 2009. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/11/05/survey>.
       
      Tsang, Jeannie. "Canadian School One of Twelve Worldwide to Participate in Microsoft Innovation Schools Program." Microsoft Canada. N.p., 1 Feb. 2007. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://www.microsoft.com/canada/media/releases/ 2007_02_01a.mspx>.
       
      Voxy. "Are We Wired for Mobile Learning?" Voxy Blog. N.p., 22 Feb. 2011. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://voxy.com/blog/2011/02/are-we-wired-for-mobile-learning/?view=infographic>.
       
      Young, Jeffrey R. "When Computers Leave Classrooms, So Does Boredom." The Chronicle Of Higher Education. N.p., 20 July 2009. Web. 14 May 2011. <http://chronicle.com/article/Teach-Naked-Effort-Strips/47398/>.
       
      Zarzour, Kim. "Modern Classroom Study of Contrasts." Markham Economist & Sun [Markham] 27 Jan. 2011: 3. Print.
       
      Zarzour, Kim. "No More Paper, No More Books." Markham Economist & Sun [Markham] 3 Feb. 2011: 3. Print.
       
      Zarzour, Kim. "Special Ed: There's an App for That." Markham Economist & Sun [Markham] 10 Feb. 2011: 3. Print.
       
      Zarzour, Kim. "‘It's Passion-Based Learning’." Markham Economist & Sun [Markham] 20 Jan. 2011: 3. Print.