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AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming
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AVB 1: Revision Aircraft Design By CCPL G. Fleming

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  • 1. AVB: 1 INSTRUCTOR: CCPL G. Fleming
  • 2. Objectives
    • Revise AVI 4
    • Identify the basic parts of, and the terminology used with, an aircraft's airframe .
  • 3. Fuselage
    • The main body of the aircraft that holds crew, passengers or freight.
    • It is a semi-monocoque structure, which means that the skin, made of stamped and framed sheets of aluminium alloy, carries the most stress.
    • The fuselage also carries the radio aerial, which is generally mounted behind the cockpit,
    • T he static vents are located on either side just forward of the entry doors or canopy.
  • 4.  
  • 5. Wings or Mainplane
    • Wings provide the lift for the aircraft.
    • Front edge of wing is called leading edge and the rear edge is called the trailing edge
    • On trailing edge near wing tips are the ailerons. Which are used to control the roll of the aircraft.
    • Near the fuselage on the trailing edge are the flaps. they are used to increase lift and drag.
    • Where the wing joins the fuselage is called the wing root.
  • 6.
    • The outer end of the wing is called the wing tip.
    • In some aircraft the mainplane is supported from the fuselage by a strut.
  • 7.  
  • 8.  
  • 9.
    • Landing lights are located in the leading edge and navigation lights on the wing tips.
    • A stall warning indicator is found on the leading edge of the wing. It is a small metal tab, which moves freely in a slot and activates either a buzzer and red light in the cockpit when the aircraft is approaching “stall speed”.
    • Aileron trim tabs are usually on more sophisticated aircraft. They assist the pilot to fly without having to place constant pressure on the controls during flight.
  • 10.
    • The fuel tanks are located in the wings. They often contain baffles to reduce the fuel surging around during flight. The filler caps are on the upper surface.
    • Each tank has a vent to allow the air pressure to remain the same above the fuel as is outside as altitude changes.
  • 11. Empennage – The Tailplane
    • The Tail Section consists of:
      • the TAILPLANE, also called the horizontal stabiliser;
      • the FIN, also called the vertical stabiliser;
      • the ELEVATOR is attached to the TAILPLANE and controls theaircraft's pitch. The elevator will have trim tabs to assist ease in flight.
      • the RUDDER is hinged to the fin and controls the aircraft yaw. Some aircraft also have rudder trim tab .
  • 12. Undercarriage
    • Almost all of the modern training aircraft have a tricycle undercarriage meaning that it has two main landing wheels plus a nose wheel.
    • These can be FIXED or RETRACTABLE.
  • 13.
    • Retractable gear can be raised or lowered electrically or hydraulically.
  • 14.
    • The nose wheel is connected to the rudder pedals to provide steering and is fitted with an oleo strut. It is a pneumatic unit that absorbs the loads and shocks when the aircraft is running along the ground.
    • Most aircraft are fitted with disc brakes on the main wheels. They are operated by toe brakes situated on top of the rudder pedals and either provide straight line braking or directional control on the ground.
  • 15.
    • Another type is the "Tail Dragger" - this type has two main landing wheels and one tail wheel.
  • 16. Engine
    • The engine is usually mounted in the fuselage at the front of the aircraft and separated from the cockpit with a firewall.
  • 17. Propeller
    • The engine in training aircraft is driven by a fixed- pitch propeller, while more advanced aircraft have a constant-speed propeller. The pitch on these propellers can be varied in flight.
  • 18. Spinner
    • Some aircraft have spinner that is used as an airflow director for cooling air that is needed for engine cooling.
  • 19. Air Intakes
    • In order to reduce high engine temperatures most modern light aircraft are air cooled by exposing their cylinders to air flow via air intakes.
    • Jet engines also have air intakes, but these are designed to produce the amount of air needed by the jet engine to operate through a range of speeds.
  • 20. Cowlings
    • To stop uneven cooling, cowling ducts at the front of the engine collect air from the pressure area behind the propeller and distributes it as even as possible around the engine and cylinders.
    • Having cooled the engine the air flow then escapes through holes at the rear section of the engine.
    • It is also designed to streamline the aircraft and reduce drag.
  • 21.  
  • 22. Exhausts
    • During engine operation, the burned gasses leave the engine cylinders and are passed out to atmosphere via the exhaust system.
  • 23. Cockpit
    • The cockpit is where the pilot and Co-pilot or passengers are seated. The pilot in command of the aircraft is seated on the left hand side.
    • The main controls and instruments are located in front of the pilot.
    • The main (or primary) controls are the flight controls and throttle.
  • 24.
    • Along side of the throttle are the mixture and carburettor heat controls.
    • Wing flaps are operated either by manual lever between the seats or electrical switch on the instrument panel.
    • A wheel between the seats usually operates the elevator trim tab.
  • 25.  
  • 26.
    • The main flight instruments are directly in front of the pilot.
    • They consist of the airspeed indicator, attitude indicator, altimeter, vertical speed indicator, a heading indicator and a turn indicator.
    • The main switches on the panel are the ignition/magneto switch, VHF- Com radio switch and the fuel selector switch located on a consol between the seats.
  • 27.  
  • 28. QUESTIONS???
  • 29. QUIZ
    • Where on the mainplane is the ailerons located?
    • Where can I find the fin?
    • What does the cowling do?
    • What is the role of the flaps?

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