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Interpersonal Relationships within a  Teamwork Setting University of Phoenix  Patrick Phillips Angela Lyons Marianna Kiva ...
Understanding Group Dynamics <ul><li>“ The motto should not be: “Forgive one another; rather understand one another.” </li...
10 guidelines for understanding group  dynamics “ When  we can communicate realness, caring, and non -judgmental understan...
Interpersonal Relationships Begin with Listening <ul><li>Hearing vs. Listening and Understanding </li></ul><ul><li>The ave...
10 Guidelines for Improving Listening Skills <ul><li>The goal is to understand and avoid misinterpretation </li></ul><ul><...
Responding <ul><li>Responding to an individual is how you communicate your thoughts and feelings. People communicate or re...
10 things to keep in mind when RESPONDING. <ul><li>Have a purpose. Ask yourself,  “What message do I want to convey” </li>...
Where is RESPECT in teamwork? <ul><li>Teamwork represents a set of values that encourage behaviors such as listening and c...
10 guidelines for building respect in teams <ul><li>Take all teammates’ opinions into consideration </li></ul><ul><li>Be o...
10 things to keep in mind when RESPONDING. <ul><li>Have a purpose. Ask yourself,  “What message do I want to convey” </li>...
TEAMWORK and ACCEPTANCE <ul><li>“ But even this wailing recrimination,” said Omar, / “is just another shape for enclosure,...
10 Ways to Practice Acceptance in Teams <ul><li>Accept responsibility for actions and words – careless deeds can adversely...
Conclusion <ul><li>Successful  interpersonal relationships within a teamwork setting, base their interactions on listening...
References <ul><li>Corey, G. (2001).  Theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy . Stamford, CT:Thomas Learning. ...
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Popwer Point Presentation Team B ( 15)

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Interpersonal Relationships within a Teamwork Setting
University of Phoenix

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Transcript of "Popwer Point Presentation Team B ( 15)"

  1. 1. Interpersonal Relationships within a Teamwork Setting University of Phoenix Patrick Phillips Angela Lyons Marianna Kiva Gail Kahler Tammi Ledbetter Marianna Kiva
  2. 2. Understanding Group Dynamics <ul><li>“ The motto should not be: “Forgive one another; rather understand one another.” </li></ul><ul><li>(Goldman, E. 1917.p7) </li></ul><ul><li>If anyone is able to get to the core of another individual, they will find that individual to be trustworthy and a positive person. </li></ul><ul><li>Given a chance, people move towards a pro-social and constructive behaviors. </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding alone is not sufficient to achieve changes within a group’s culture. </li></ul><ul><li>It must be a special kind of understanding: </li></ul><ul><li>ACCURATE ,EMPHATIC UNDERSTANDING </li></ul><ul><li>It leads to : re-think a situation, have a change of heart as we come to understand what formerly seemed odd, strange, unknown, and different. </li></ul><ul><li>Marianna Kiva </li></ul>
  3. 3. 10 guidelines for understanding group dynamics “ When we can communicate realness, caring, and non -judgmental understanding, significant changes are most likely to occur.” ( Corey, G. 2001, p. 173) <ul><li>Unconditional positive regard </li></ul><ul><li>Believe that not everything is intentional </li></ul><ul><li>Trust that everybody will move forward </li></ul><ul><li>Groups must function “in the here and now” to attend to all issues </li></ul><ul><li>Each member of the group must understand the subjective world of another person </li></ul><ul><li>Marianna Kiva </li></ul><ul><li>Engage in meaningful self-explorations </li></ul><ul><li>“… Individual has the inherent capacity to move away from maladjustment …” Gerald, Corey, (2001) </li></ul><ul><li>Move into constructive directions as part of the group </li></ul><ul><li>Not everything is about one person </li></ul><ul><li>Find something to connect with ,to all members of the group </li></ul>
  4. 4. Interpersonal Relationships Begin with Listening <ul><li>Hearing vs. Listening and Understanding </li></ul><ul><li>The average Listening efficiency is 25% </li></ul><ul><li>Make the most of every opportunity to gain information </li></ul><ul><li>Use Conscious and Empathetic Listening </li></ul><ul><li>Gail Kahler </li></ul><ul><li>Focus. Listen. Connect. </li></ul><ul><li>Durkin, D. (Apr 2006). </li></ul>
  5. 5. 10 Guidelines for Improving Listening Skills <ul><li>The goal is to understand and avoid misinterpretation </li></ul><ul><li>Minimize interruptions and distractions (cell phones) </li></ul><ul><li>Be an active listener: reciprocate with verbal and non-verbal responses </li></ul><ul><li>Listen for the speaker’s motives, needs and wants </li></ul><ul><li>Listen for the speaker’s verbal and non-verbal messages </li></ul><ul><li>Be aware of “paralanguage”: volume, tone, pace, use of pauses and silence </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain a relaxed and interested posture and make eye contact </li></ul><ul><li>Reflect on content by asking questions and paraphrasing to check understanding, especially with someone from another culture </li></ul><ul><li>Interrupt as little as possible </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid finishing the speaker’s sentences </li></ul><ul><li>(Lam, 2000) </li></ul><ul><li>Gail Kahler </li></ul>
  6. 6. Responding <ul><li>Responding to an individual is how you communicate your thoughts and feelings. People communicate or respond in many different ways. When responding or communicating it is necessary to be aware of your body language, tone of voice, verbal language, and the purpose. In order to respond effectively; listening, respecting, accepting, and understanding should be in place. </li></ul>Be aware of these qualities when responding Tammi Ledbetter Tone of Voice Language / Vocabulary Body Language The Purpose
  7. 7. 10 things to keep in mind when RESPONDING. <ul><li>Have a purpose. Ask yourself, “What message do I want to convey” </li></ul><ul><li>Know who you are responding to. Who is your audience? </li></ul><ul><li>If time permits prepare your response. Think before you speak. </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate attentive listening (Gibbs, 2001, p.74), do not do all of the talking </li></ul><ul><li>The vocabulary you use should be friendly for the audience. </li></ul><ul><li>Your body language should be appropriate. </li></ul><ul><li>Your tone of voice should help deliver your message. </li></ul><ul><li>Show mutual respect (Gibbs, 2001, p.74)to your audience. </li></ul><ul><li>Have an understanding of where your audience is coming from. </li></ul><ul><li>Take a risk, but accept that everyone is different and might interpret your response different. </li></ul>Tammi Ledbetter
  8. 8. Where is RESPECT in teamwork? <ul><li>Teamwork represents a set of values that encourage behaviors such as listening and constructively responding to points of view expressed by others, giving others the benefit of the doubt, providing support to those who need it, and recognizing the interests and achievements of others. -Katzenbach & Smith </li></ul><ul><li>Angela Lyons </li></ul>
  9. 9. 10 guidelines for building respect in teams <ul><li>Take all teammates’ opinions into consideration </li></ul><ul><li>Be open to various points of view; and try to understand them </li></ul><ul><li>Keep lines of communication open </li></ul><ul><li>Build teammates up instead of tearing them down </li></ul><ul><li>Do not pressure other teammates </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid last minute changes and surprises </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t worry over minor infractions </li></ul><ul><li>Do your best to understand as much as to be understood </li></ul><ul><li>Show consideration for people speaking (writing) </li></ul><ul><li>Give credit towards individuality and diversity of contributions </li></ul><ul><li>Angela Lyons </li></ul>
  10. 10. 10 things to keep in mind when RESPONDING. <ul><li>Have a purpose. Ask yourself, “What message do I want to convey” </li></ul><ul><li>Know who you are responding to. Who is your audience? </li></ul><ul><li>If time permits prepare your response. Think before you speak. </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate attentive listening (Gibbs, 2001, p.74), do not do all of the talking </li></ul><ul><li>The vocabulary you use should be friendly for the audience. </li></ul><ul><li>Your body language should be appropriate. </li></ul><ul><li>Your tone of voice should help deliver your message. </li></ul><ul><li>Show mutual respect (Gibbs, 2001, p.74)to your audience. </li></ul><ul><li>Have an understanding of where your audience is coming from. </li></ul><ul><li>Take a risk, but accept that everyone is different and might interpret your response different. </li></ul>Tammi Ledbetter
  11. 11. TEAMWORK and ACCEPTANCE <ul><li>“ But even this wailing recrimination,” said Omar, / “is just another shape for enclosure, another joint / on the reed. Pierce the segments and be hollow, / with perforated walls, so flute music can happen.” (Rumi, trans. 1995, p. 120) </li></ul><ul><li>The Sufi poet, Rumi, used a flute as a metaphor for acceptance. A blocked reed cannot produce music. With its inner walls intact, a reed does not let air flow through it to be shaped and molded into sound – it produces nothing. In team discussions, quibbling over trivialities or resistance to new ideas stifle the voice of the team. Members of a team should break down the walls of resistance within themselves in order to let the ideas and general will of the team flow through them. Only then will each member be able to able to shape the discussion and contribute their own unique sound to the concert. </li></ul><ul><li>Patrick Phillips </li></ul>
  12. 12. 10 Ways to Practice Acceptance in Teams <ul><li>Accept responsibility for actions and words – careless deeds can adversely impact the unity of a team. </li></ul><ul><li>Accept the different roles within the team – everyone has strengths; good teams assign tasks accordingly </li></ul><ul><li>Accept the suggestions of others – constructive opinions help both teams and individuals grow </li></ul><ul><li>Accept the leadership of others </li></ul><ul><li>Accept that all team members will sometimes have to assume leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Accept the team’s goals – they are necessary in order to clear up confusion about a team’s purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Accept the team’s strategy/plan – goals cannot be reached by wishing alone; a good team works together to achieve results </li></ul><ul><li>Accept the team’s rules – necessary for teams to overcome obstacles and follow the plans they set </li></ul><ul><li>Accept one’s limitations </li></ul><ul><li>Accept help from others </li></ul><ul><li>Accept differences of opinions </li></ul><ul><li>Patrick Phillips </li></ul>
  13. 13. Conclusion <ul><li>Successful interpersonal relationships within a teamwork setting, base their interactions on listening, accepting, respecting, understanding, and responding to every member of the team. </li></ul><ul><li>Ongoing positive learning experiences will result from maintaining interest and enthusiasm for all members on the team. </li></ul><ul><li>Marianna Kiva </li></ul>Patrick Phillips Marianna Kiva Gail Kahler Tammi Ledbetter Angela Lyons
  14. 14. References <ul><li>Corey, G. (2001). Theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy . Stamford, CT:Thomas Learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Durkin, D. (Apr 2006). Build customer loyalty. Sales & Service Excellence , 6 (4), 9-9. Retrieved June 11,2006, from the EBSCO database.  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Gibbs, J. (2001). Tribes a new way of learning and being together. California: CenterSource Systems, LLC. </li></ul><ul><li>Goldman, E. ( 1917) Anarchism and other essays . New York: Mother Earth Publishing Association. </li></ul><ul><li>HeartMath LLC 2006, Quotes of the Heart. (n. d.). Teamwork quotes and proverbs . Retrieved June 12, 2006 from http://www.heartquotes.net/teamwork-quotes.html </li></ul><ul><li>Lam, M. (2000). The Gentle art of listening: skills for developing family-administrator  relationships in early childhood. Early Childhood Education Journal, 27 (4), 267-273. Retrieved June 12,2006 from EBSCO database. </li></ul><ul><li>Rumi, J. (1995). The Essential Rumi (C. Barks & J. Moyne, Trans.). New York: HarperCollins. (Original work published n.d.). </li></ul><ul><li>Rogers, C. (2001). Freedom to learn . Brooks/Cole Thompson Learning. </li></ul>
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