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H114 Meeting 19: How Did Soldiers Experience WWI and Its Aftermath?
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H114 Meeting 19: How Did Soldiers Experience WWI and Its Aftermath?

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H114 Meeting 19: How Did Soldiers Experience WWI and Its Aftermath? H114 Meeting 19: How Did Soldiers Experience WWI and Its Aftermath? Presentation Transcript

  • HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION: 1648 TO PRESENT LECTURE 18: HOW DID SOLDIERS EXPERIENCE WWI?
  • I. Causes of WWI A. Long-term causes 1. Bismark and the System of Alliances
  • Europe, 1914 Triple Entente Triple Alliance
  • I. Causes of WWI A. Long-term causes 1. Bismark and the System of Alliances 2. Balkan Wars
  • I. Causes of WWI A. Long-term causes B. Short-term causes 1. On June 28, 1914, a Serbian nationalist, Gavrilo Princip, assassinates the heir to the Habsburg monarchy, Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his wife Sofie during a visit to Sarajevo
  • Sophia and Francis Ferdinand, Archduke and Archduchess of Hungary
  • Capture of Princip
  • I. Causes of WWI A. Long-term causes B. Short-term causes 1. On June 28, 1914, a Serbian nationalist, Gavrilo Princip, assassinates the heir to the Habsburg monarchy, Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his wife Sofie during a visit to Sarajevo 2. Austria-Hungary reacted strongly  gave ultimatum to Serbia on July 23, 1914  obviously stated to provoke a war 3. July 28, 1914 Austria declares war on Serbia
  • I. Causes of WWI II. Course of WWI A. Schlieffen Plan B. New Technologies
  • I. Causes of WWI II. Course of WWI A. Schlieffen Plan B. New Technologies
  • French Soldiers at Verdun Frontline
  • French Soldiers at Verdun
  • German Troops go “Over the Top”
  • I. Causes of WWI II. Course of WWI III. The Culture of WWI A. The Home Front Rationing Bread and Wine in Vienna during WWI
  • I. Causes of WWI II. Course of WWI III. The Culture of WWI A. The Home Front B. Gender To the Young Women of London, Is your “Best Boy” wearing Khaki? If not don’t YOU THINK he should be? If he does not think that you and your country are worth fighting for – do you think that he is WORTHY of you?
  • Go, O soldier, and fulfill thy duty. Christ, The Good Shepherd, watches his flocks. Lord, Thy Kingdom Come, And As Thy Will is in Heaven May it also be on earth.
  • I. Causes of WWI II. Course of WWI III. The Culture of WWI A. The Home Front B. Gender C. Class D. Lost Generation
  • THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION
  • I. Russia to 1905 A. The Great Reforms 1. Russia to 1850 2. Crimean War 3. Alexander II (r. 1855-1881), the “Tsar Liberator” a. Village Commune (mir) b. Commercial Farmers (kulaks) Alexander II
  • I. Russia to 1905 A. The Great Reforms 1. Russia to 1850 2. Crimean War 3. Alexander II (r. 1855-1881), the “Tsar Liberator” 4. Modernization of the State a. Railroads b. Industrialization Trans-Siberian Railroad (built 1891-1916)
  • I. Russia to 1905 A. The Great Reforms 1. Russia to 1850 2. Crimean War 3. Alexander II (r. 1855-1881), the “Tsar Liberator” 4. Modernization of the State
  • I. Russia to 1905 A. The Great Reforms B. Significance of Russian Reforms
  • I. Russia to 1905 II. 1905 to 1917 A. Industry and Society B. Russo-Japanese War (1904-5) Admiral Togo's defeat of the Russian fleet on May 27-28, 1905 in the battle of Tsushima in the Straights of Korea
  • I. Russia to 1905 II. 1905 to 1917 A. Industry and Society B. Russo-Japanese War (1904-5) 1. Bloody Sunday (January 9, 1905) 2. Soviets 3. Reforms and the Duma Demonstrators Being Shot at Narew Gate, St. Petersburg (January 9, 1905)
  • I. Russia to 1905 II. 1905 to 1917 III. The Two Revolutions A. Consequences of WWI 1. The Eastern Front Russian Dead in WWI
  • I. Russia to 1905 II. 1905 to 1917 III. The Two Revolutions A. Consequences of WWI 1. The Eastern Front 2. Imperial Intrigue 3. The Home Front Rasputin
  • I. Russia to 1905 II. 1905 to 1917 III. The Two Revolutions A. Consequences of WWI 1. The February Revolution a. Provisional Government and Kerenski b. Petrograd Soviet c. Marxists: Mensheviks and Bolsheviks d. Lenin’s “April Theses”: “peace, land, and bread”
  • I. Russia to 1905 II. 1905 to 1917 III. The Two Revolutions A. Consequences of WWI 1. The February Revolution 2. The October Revolution A. Treaty of Brest-Litovsk
  • Lenin Speaking on May Day 1918
  • I. Russia to 1905 II. 1905 to 1917 III. The Two Revolutions IV. Civil War (1918-22) A. Whites and the Reds L. M. Lissitzsky, Beat the Whites with the Red Wedge (1919)
  • I. Russia to 1905 II. 1905 to 1917 III. The Two Revolutions IV. Civil War (1918-22) A. Whites and the Reds B. Execution of the Royal Family Nicholas II and Family
  • Execution Room of Romanov Family
  • I. Russia to 1905 II. 1905 to 1917 III. The Two Revolutions IV. Civil War (1918-22) A. Whites and the Reds B. Execution of the Royal Family C. Consequences 1. Economy 2. Politburo led by Lenin