• Save
H114 Meeting 10: What is Nationalism?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

H114 Meeting 10: What is Nationalism?

on

  • 362 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
362
Views on SlideShare
264
Embed Views
98

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 98

http://h114.wordpress.com 98

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

H114 Meeting 10: What is Nationalism? H114 Meeting 10: What is Nationalism? Presentation Transcript

  • HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION: 1648 TO PRESENT LECTURE 12: WHAT IS NATIONALISM?
  • What does it mean to be an American?
  • Movement in which the nation-state is regarded as paramount for the realization of social, cultural, and economic aspirations of a group of people.
  • Development 1. Short-term causes a. Foreign domination b. Intellectual idealism
  • Johann Gottlieb Fichte: Address To The German Nation, 1807 In this belief in our earliest common forefathers, the original stock of the new culture, the Germans, as the Romans called them, bravely resisted the oncoming world dominion of the Romans. Did they not have before their eyes the greater brilliance of the Roman provinces next to them and the more refined enjoyments in those provinces, to say nothing of laws and judges . . . in superfluity? Were not the Romans willing enough to let them share in all these blessings? I. . . To those who submitted the Romans gave marks of distinction in the form of kingly titles, high commands in their armies, and Roman fillets; and if they were driven out by their countrymen, did not the Romans provide for them a place of refuge and a means of subsistence in their colonies? Had they no appreciation of the advantages of Roman civilization, of the superior organization of their armies, in which even Arminius did not disdain to learn the trade of war? Their descendants, as soon as they could do so without losing their freedom, even assimilated Roman culture, so far as this was possible without losing their individuality. Freedom to them meant just this: remaining Germans and continuing to settle their own affairs, independently and in accordance with the original spirit of their race, going on with their development in accordance with the same spirit, and propagating this independence in their posterity. All those blessings which the Romans offered them meant slavery to them because then they would have to become something that was not German, they would have to become half-Roman. They assumed as a matter of course that every man would rather die than become half a Roman, and that a true German could only want to live in order to be, and to remain, just a German and to bring up his children as Germans.
  • Development 1. Short-term causes 2. Long-term causes a. Process of state centralization b. Vernacular and Print Culture
  • Forms and Functions in the early nineteenth century 1. Identity 2. Liberalism/Conservatism 3. Romantic, Militant, Political • Zeitgeist, folk legends and epics, language 4. Racism
  • Imagined communities 1. The development of nations and nationalism are historical phenomena. 2. Religion, race, ethnicity, language, etc. are symbolic categories to which humans give cultural meaning. 3. These categories are artificial, but potent, symbols that humans have created to help organize their societies. In the nineteenth century, these categories helped them express the idea of nationality.